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Acknowledgements

The world we live in differs quite a lot from the place we lived in even a couple of decades ago. The ethnic and religious backgrounds of the people populating the European countries are drastically more diverse compared to any period in the history of the continent. So, we have to learn how to live together and how to benefit from one another. Schools can play a vital role in making students more open to otherness. The mission of education is to counteract prejudices and discrimination, and to boost mutual respect and tolerance among groups of people with different lifestyles. To support teachers in in their task, we created a Teacher’s Manual and a Digital Tools pack comprising ready-to-use resources for extracurricular trainings in schools.
The project was inspired by the idea of Ms. Yovka Tomova, head of the management board of “Prosveta – Sofia” Publishing House, who encouraged the Bulgarian team to design a project aimed at bringing up young people who will make the world a better place to live in, a world of mutual understanding and respect.
The project design was shaped with the active encouragement and methodological and contents support of Nataliya Nikolova, experienced SALTO trainer and researcher in human rights and discrimination related thematic areas.
The present output is the outcome of the collective efforts the partner organizations: AENAO - Greece, Instituto Politecnico de Santarem - Portugal, University of Social Sciences – Poland, Altius Foundation – Spain,  Inspectoratul Scolar Jud. Dolj – Romania and the lead partner “Prosveta - Sofia” Foundation, Bulgaria. Special thanks to Natassa Timologou from AENAO - Greece, for her professional management of the creation of the Teacher’s Manual and her methodology support, and to our Portuguese colleagues Ana Torres and Mauricio Dias for their invaluable support regarding the Digital Tool resource pack and the design of the project website.
The final versions of the outputs have also been the outcome of the contributions of the participating teachers who piloted the created products with their students during school years 2016/ 2017and 2017/ 2018 (the first edition of the Manual) and the ones who participated in the implementation during school years 2019/2020 and 2020/2021. The volunteer teacher we worked with became co-authors of the Manual. They provided tips and suggested changes to the training materials based on the face-to-face training sessions they held with their students.


       Elena Lazarova
       Researcher and project manager
       My Europe – Your Europe – Your Say  project
       Prosveta – Sofia Foundation
       Bulgaria

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Preface

How do we transform from ordinary inhabitants to citizens of our state and society? How can we protect our human rights? What does it mean to accept and respect differences? These are only few of the questions we face in the process of becoming adults and complete personalities. Developing sensitivity and tolerance towards diversity in the contemporary world is a lengthy and difficult process influenced by all aspects of our lives – at home, at school while we study and interact with our classmates and teachers, while we do projects, solve problems and fulfil our dreams, in our free time activities. As students spend most of their time at school with their classmates and teachers, this manual is also geared toward all teachers who believe they can contribute to making students active citizens. It is geared toward all teachers who don’t simply teach their subject but also use informal education to help young people develop social and civic competences. Students are encouraged to express themselves and build skills that enable them to be tolerant through practical situations and sharing experiences. Besides, students discover ways to adjust to the world around them and to change it at the same time. The most important message conveyed in the resource pack is that young people can make our world more colourful and a better place to live in - as long as we give them the chance to try and achieve it while they are at school and we teach them to take responsibility for their actions. Active citizens fight for their rights without breaching the rights of other people. Active citizens are sensitive to the diversity of the world and don’t deny other people’s right to be different. In this book, partners from six educational institutions not only support teachers in teaching civic education but also provide tools relevant for the digital students we have in modern schools, tools that match their learning styles. Students are given the opportunity to learn about relationship rules and discover the world around them in a dynamic and interactive learning environment and through making use of information and communications technologies. 

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Introduction

Every individual is unique, equally worthy and has the right to live according to their beliefs, customs, practices and established behavior rules.
Globalization and migration have brought together people from different ethnic origins, religious backgrounds, beliefs, traditions and languages. However, sharing a common space does not automatically result in overcoming the boundaries of historically constituted communities; it does not necessarily involve opening yourself to Otherness, trying to understand differences, valuing diversity and building common grounds for dialogue. But we live together and we should not only tolerate this diversity, we should value it as an opportunity through which we can learn from one another in order to build stronger, more dynamic societies. Human rights, diversity, tolerance and non-violence related issues have become even more important during the past few years considering recent events of wars, world attacks and refugee crisis.
The impact of the existing beliefs, customs, practices and behavior within a society naturally come first and they play the most influential role in shaping students’ attitude to otherness. However, schooling could play a key role in overcoming the historically developed negative attitudes to human differences. It could support students in being open-minded, understanding the others. The realization of this role suggests that teachers, on the one hand, with all their actions and interactions emit respect to students’ individuality; on the other hand, have the knowledge, skills and tools which will enable them to discuss with their students any emerging questions on existing notions of human differences in society and the expectations about the behavior towards their bearers rather than avoiding such questions or reaffirming as true the public valid impressions and expectations.
My Europe – Your Europe – Your Say project comprises of three major topics; Human Rights, Diversity and Social Inclusion and Identity and Active Citizenship 

But what is the meaning of all these?


1. Human Rights - Through this section, students will learn what Human Rights are as being set down in international law and respect them.
According to United Nations (United Nations Human Rights), Human Rights are rights inherent to all human beings, whatever our nationality, place of residence, sex, national or ethnic origin, colour, religion, language, or any other status. We are all equally entitled to our human rights without discrimination. These rights are all interrelated, interdependent and indivisible.
On the 10th of December 1948 the United Nations General Assembly which was held in Paris, proclaimed the Universal Declaration of Human Rights (UDHR); a document that is considered a milestone in the history of human rights. Now, United Nations’ Declaration of Human Rights consists of 30 articles (United Nations, 2016) according to which all humans are born as members of a society, they are equal, free and have the right to justice, privacy, property, work, health, leisure, education, freedom of movement, and take part in the government of his/her country.
             “To deny people their human rights is to challenge their very humanity”,

                                                                                                    Nelson Mandela.


2. Diversity and Social Inclusion This topic will encourage students to value better every member of society as a human being and feel valued themselves as human beings.
The concept of diversity encompasses acceptance and respect. It means understanding that each individual is unique, and recognizing our individual differences. These can be along the dimensions of race, ethnicity, gender, sexual orientation, socio-economic status, age, physical abilities, religious beliefs, political beliefs, or other ideologies (Oregon University). Diversity aims to recognize, respect and value people’s differences to contribute and realize their full potential by promoting an inclusive culture for all.
Diversity is around us; at school, at the workplace, within families, everywhere. Particularly in schools where more and more students from diverse backgrounds populate the classrooms, it is essential to provide methods and approaches adjustable to the “different”. Numerous studies show that diversity in schools needs to be addressed in a manner of “Culturally Responsive Pedagogy” (Heraldo V. Richards; Ayanna F. Brown; Timothy B.Forde, 2007), since teachers educate students varying in culture, language, abilities and many other characteristics. Therefore, this manual will provide activities in order to empower and enrich students with knowledge and skills towards diverse groups of people.
      “It is time for parents to teach young people early on that in diversity there is beauty and there is strength.”
                                                                                  Maya Angelou

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3. Identity and Active Citizenship  – This section will enable students to contribute more to life of the community they live in and become involved, participate and actively contribute.
The origin of citizenship can be traced back to Ancient Greece, when "citizens" were those who had a legal right to participate in the affairs of the state. However, by no means was everyone a citizen: slaves, peasants, women or resident foreigners were mere subjects. For those who did have the privileged status of being citizens, the idea of "civic virtue" or being a "good" citizen was an important part of the concept, since participation was not considered only a right but also, and first of all, a duty. A citizen who did not meet his responsibilities was considered socially disruptive (Council of Europe, 2012).
Nowadays, terms such as “Active Citizens” and “European Citizenship” are rather popular, particularly to young people who will become tomorrow’s citizens. These terms have multiple dimensions; political, social, economical and cultural and are directly related to the ability of an entity to influence and shape a community. According to the Model Citizen project (Social Education Victoria) “Citizens are members of a group or community who share the same rights and responsibilities. As a citizen you can expect to be treated in the same way as everybody else in your community. Active citizens take action in order to improve their community, to make a difference!”


    “It is not always the same thing to be a good man and a good citizen.”
                                                                                    Aristotle

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Instruction to teachers


Dear Coordinators and Educators,

The project “My Europe – Your Europe – Your Say”  was developed as an effort to support values and attitudes to students so that they could respect the different, the diverse and the unique. It is addressed to students aged from 12 to 16 years old, since this is considered as an appropriate age range where interventions such as this one can have an actual impact.
Being the coordinators/educators you are given the opportunity to be flexible, deliver the knowledge and play a decisive role in the development, progress and successful completion of the program. The key elements that can guarantee the successful implementation of the project are guidance of the team, your projecting personality, the knowledge acquired and the specialized training you received, as well as taking full advantage of the potential of the team you are coordinating. At the same time you must make sure to provide a positive emotional atmosphere, supporting thusly mutual respect of all team members, encouraging their equal participation and involvement and ensuring the effectiveness of the project.

Closing, your main objective must be to enhance the development of the teenagers’ skills and self-esteem, which originates from their own personal skills. In this way you shall help students to develop a positive attitude and behavior towards Otherness.

Introducing new teaching methods may become stressful at the beginning. The following advice could significantly help you in order to properly implement the project.

  • Do not use any teaching methods, which you, yourselves, are not willing to implement.
  • Provide a well-prepared exercise. Give clear instructions and consider the dimensions and probable turn the exercise may take, although it is not possible to predict all possibilities.
  • Each innovation encompasses a possible rate of failure. Though a well-prepared method could limit such probability, you have to keep in mind that the more methods you use, the easier will be for you to implement non-formal education.
  • Every time you introduce a new method, you can ensure bigger success if:
    • what you have planned is introduced in a specific manner.
    • you accept the way students think and function even if this way is not the one you aim at. The solution is to intervene in the improper behavior of a student without rejecting him at the same time. 
  • Consider the concurrent objectives that can be achieved when using a specific method. For example, an energiser can be used to stimulate the students but at the same time it could also generate the following positive effects:
    • it can improve the children’s communication
    • it can provide the ability to students to undertake their own responsibilities
    • it can help creating a nice atmosphere in the classroom.
  • If you apply a new teaching method for the first time unsuccessfully, this does not mean that this method cannot be effective in the future. On the contrary, try to learn as much as possible from this experience in order to be better prepared next time.
  • You may be puzzled by the fact that the use of active learning methods causes a mess and you feel you are losing control of the class. You must bear in mind that applying new teaching methods presupposes a different kind of control. When students work with a variety of methods it is natural not to be continuously in direct contact with them. The general intervention strategy must be clear and you should be able to intervene when necessary.
  • Consider the sufficiency of time made available for each resource as well as the appropriateness of the teaching classroom for applying the specific method (size, furniture arrangement, proximity to other classrooms).
  • Last but not least: Relax and have fun! After all, this is what Non Formal Education is about!

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Class preparation


Students may come to class either with great or less interest. Sometimes the coordinator may face notable resistance if he/she begins directly with the planned theme. The students in the class may at first need to calm down or to be stimulated. There is a series of methods that can be used to start a resource:

  • Begin with an energiser to evoke the students’ interest.
  • Use a relaxation exercise or appropriate music when children are very unquiet.
  • If students are facing a problem, then perhaps it would be better to deal with it at first. In practice you may discover that this particular issue can cover the entire activity although it was not planned.


Closing the resource
At the end of each resource there must be time left to connect and close the issues raised, and students must have time to prepare the topic for the next meeting. It is important that nothing is left hanging in the air. All issues should be properly resolved. The activity should also be closed by making positive comments on:

  • what is achieved
  • the dynamic of the team
  • the progress made
  • the significant facts established by the team
  • any unusual incident that may have occurred
  • the work to be prepared for the next meeting (depending on the resource that follows).

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Hopes & fears / Group Contract

Topic / Activity Name

Duration

60 min

Aim / Objectives

  • To clarify objectives and expectations of students
  • To clarify what are the “rules” and what are the “values” of the group
  • To create a safe learning environment
  • To facilitate participants' communication on different levels.

Preparation

  • Suggested Reading, Tips, etc.
  • Materials
  • Materials:
  • For Hopes & Fears

Post-it notes in two different colours, i.e. yellow and blue (one for hopes, one for fears)

2 Big Carton papers in two different colours (one for hopes, one for fears)

Markers

Tape to stick at wall

Relaxing Music (optional)

  • For Group Contract

Big Carton or flipchart paper

Markers

Tape to stick at wall

  • Tips

The teacher can ask (prior to this introductory exercise) the students to draw the 2 carton papers with something that symbolizes HOPES (i.e. an island with calm sea surrounding it, a tree etc) and FEARS (i.e. a scarecrow, a thunderstorm etc).

Introduction

This exercise should be done as an introductory exercise, so that students would begin to have an “idea” of what is going to happen in the next following weeks.

Methodology

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Hopes & Fears

Teachers sticks on the wall the two drawings and he/she explains that the one drawing represents the hopes that the students have on this project and the other one represents their fears.

Teacher gives students two post-it notes; one yellow, one blue. Students write their expectations/hopes on the project at the yellow paper and their fears on the blue paper. Once they all finish writing, they go altogether at the drawings and they stick their post-it notes on them. Once all posts it are stuck, students sit down. The teacher reads first the hopes (he/she can even categorise them if there are similarities). Then the teacher reads the fears (he/she can also categorise them).

The teacher finally explains to the students that their hopes/fears will be stuck on the wall until the project is over.                                       (25’)

At the end of the project, teacher asks the students to have a look again at their hopes/fears and reflect on them. Are there things that have been overcome? Has the project fulfilled their expectations?       

Students can have a small conversation on the plenary and discuss their hopes/fears and what might was different at the end.                (15’)

Group contract

Teacher discuss with students that this project will teach them aspects about Human Rights, Diversity and Active Citizenship in a different way that they have been used to. It is more like a game. Since this group will be together in this project for several weeks, it would be good to establish some rules – which everyone has to respect.

Teacher guides the conversation and students brainstorm about the rules they want to establish, for eg they will respect everyone’s opinion, there will not be any judgment, respecting silence when is required, the importance of participation, etc etc. The teacher or a student writes all the “rules” on a carton paper or a flipchart. Once they finish, everyone signs the Group contract and they stick it on the wall until the project is over.                   (20’)

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NON FORMAL EDUCATION

Teaching methods
In European projects – particularly within the frame of Erasmus - it is preferable to apply non-traditional teaching methods, which create a pleasant atmosphere in the class and turn the “learning” into an interesting experience. In order to choose a method we have taken into consideration the aims of the resource. An appropriate method encourages students to identify situations in the reality of daily life and it gives them the opportunity to discuss issues as seen from their own point of view. To ensure success of the method it is necessary to prepare it in the right manner.
This manual consists of 66 resources regarding three major topics: Human Rights, Diversity and Social Inclusion and Identity & Active Citizenship. Each resource consists of two tools: (a) Non Formal Education (NFE) Tool and (b) Digital Tool (DT). The NFE tool describes the “exercise” (activity) which should be utilized within the group. The DT is an extra tool which is used to enrich the NFE tool. Depending on the tool used, the DT could be used either prior, during or after the implementation of the activity. The NFE tools used are somehow “repeatable”; the same tool (method) can be used in a variety of resources. The same principle accounts for the DT’s.
Some of these methods (NFE tools) which are applied on the specific project are described below:

1. Team work
It has been established that team work in small groups of 4-6 students is a very effective working method. In small groups students have the opportunity to acquire knowledge, to comprehend and apply such knowledge while shaping attitudes and making choices. By discussing, participating and communicating in the group, students can develop and exercise appropriate skills.
Organizing the class into small groups can be achieved in different ways:
- The educator explicates an activity and students shape small groups of 4-6 persons in which they practice such activity.
* The activity could involve discussion, artistic creation, presentation, video making, role playing, brainstorming, simulation etc. All these activities could be utilized through team work, where the key element is the same; working in small groups.
- The educator introduces the topic, students discuss it in groups and present their conclusions to all members of the class.
- Students work individually and afterwards they discuss their conclusions in their group.
- By discussing in the class, an issue is raised and students are divided into small groups in order to discuss and propose solutions.


2. Brainstorming
Brainstorming is a creative method aiming at expressing a variety of ideas. It can be applied for several reasons; most commonly is used in order to cover as many aspects of the topic under discussion as possible.
Brainstorming does not mean simply asking for ideas from others. For an effective brainstorming there are a few rules to be followed:
- the question or topic must be well defined
- team members must express any idea crossing their mind as an answer to the question.
- No one should comment on the others’ ideas. We insist on it.
Brainstorming is quite simple to utilize. The educator writes the topic or question on the blackboard, then explains the rules to the class setting a time limit, e.g. 5 minutes. Students are asked to begin. The educator writes the ideas on the blackboard quickly. If there is a gap established, the educator can fill in his/her ideas. Depending on the ideas written, they could be categorized, i.e. a few ideas could fall under the same “major” category.
The next step is to process the ideas and move on to action. In some cases it may be necessary to ask students to specify some ideas. In this stage some ideas can be clarified, evaluated, chosen and ranked. This procedure is necessary in order to differentiate the ideas, i.e. if there is no differentiation during acceptance of ideas, there will probably be the impression that all ideas are equal and acceptable.


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3. Role-playing games
In role-playing games a certain situation is carried over from the real world into the frame of the role-playing game. Role-playing games are useful when we wish to analyze certain behaviors or to test new or alternative behaviors within a controlled and safe framework. In order to use the role-playing games it is necessary to have a warm and open-minded atmosphere in the class.
It is important that all participants are aware of the meaning of the role-playing games and that they agree on certain basic rules in order to work together in a structured manner. Therefore, the educator has to explain in brief the methodology of the role-playing games and further on, the class has to set some rules for the students, playing the roles, and for the students, watching the game, before the game starts. Then, the topic is defined as a certain situation and is described with every detail in order to help all participants to understand it. Every scene chosen should not last longer than a few minutes.
Students, not participating actively in the role-playing game, function as the observers and they are the audience. The educator acts as the coordinator or “director” and is responsible for planning, carrying out and evaluating the activity.


4. Simulation
A simulation game (Patricia K. Tompkins, 1998) is a recreation of a real-world situation, designed to explore key elements of that situation. Similarly to role playing, simulations always include an element of role. During a simulation game the students need to perform a certain situation based on real life situations, while in role playing the participants are representing and experiencing some character type known in everyday life.


5. Artistic creation (drawing, painting, collage)
Certain forms of art are a useful non formal teaching approach within a group. In this case students do not just discuss or write about the different social situations, but they also capture and express these situations in paintings and drawings. The can also make collages to express themselves and their skills without requiring a certain talent or specialized skills. It is important that students overcome their fears in artistic creation. Therefore extra care must be given in order to make them understand that the aim of such an exercise is not to create a work of art but to express themselves in a free manner.


6. Case study
A case study (UNSW Australia) is an account of an activity, event or problem that contains a real or hypothetical situation. Case studies can be used in order to help the students understand how the complexities of real life influence decisions. A common case usually:
- is taken from real life or is hypothetical
- consists of many parts and each part usually ends with problems and points for discussion. There may not be a clear cut off point to the situation.
- includes sufficient information for the reader to treat problems and issues.
- is believable for the reader (the case contains the setting, personalities, sequence of events, problems and conflicts).
A case study is given to students as an example in order for them to implement an exercise, while at the same time trying to focus on the issue described.
*All material used for the purposes of this project is located on the project’s website. Educators, and in some cases students, will be instructed to use the material given in the description of each resource.


7. Guided Drama
This is an activity in which students are presented a case as far as general settings and characters are concerned. They are guided through the framework of the plot by receiving descriptions of planned events (meetings) and of their tasks in the respected meetings (messages). They are to step in the shoes of the characters and, keeping to the provided information, are free to decide on the story, i.e. details of the plot, characters’ speech, etc. The printed information is distributed to the students immediately before the events; students read it and plan their actions and speech right away, similarly to ‘speed dating’ techniques.


8. Mind Map

A mind map (Wikipedia) is a diagram used to visually organize information. A mind map is often created around a single concept, drawn as an image in the center of a blank page, to which associated representations of ideas such as images, words and parts of words are added. Major ideas are connected directly to the central concept, and other ideas branch out from those. Mind maps can be drawn by hand, either as "rough notes" during a lecture, meeting or planning session, for example, or as higher quality pictures when more time is available.

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9. Reciprocal Maieutic Approach
The Reciprocal Maieutic Approach (RMA) (Dolci Amico; Amico Fausto) is a dialectic method of inquiry and "popular self-analysis" for empowerment of communities and individuals and it can be defined as a “process ofcollective exploration that takes, as a departure point, the experienceand the intuition of individuals” (Dolci, 1996). The RMA was developed by Danilo Dolci from the Socratic concept of Maieutic. Socrates’ Maieutics was unidirectional, while for Danilo Dolci the concept of knowledge comes from experience and a reciprocal relationship is necessary. As the name says, RMA is a “reciprocal” process between at least two persons and it is normally done inside a group, with one person that asking questions and others giving answers. It is the reciprocal maieutic communication that brings out people’s knowledge, with all participants learning from each other.


10. Oxford- Style Debate
Students will be engaged in a mock decision-making process that allows them to explore a topic related to democracy and the law in their country or in their school, apply critical thinking skills in a real-life-case scenario, share their opinions with others while respecting others’ views.
Derived from the Oxford Union debating society of Oxford University (The Oxford Union), "Oxford-style" debating is a competitive debate format featuring a sharply framed motion that is proposed by one side and opposed by another.

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11. Blue skies thinking
Blue skies thinking is a well-known and widely used interactive method for generating ideas. It encourages participants to use their imaginations and be creative. It helps elicit numerous solutions to any given problem; for example, ‘what should I do in this situation?’ or ‘how can we overcome this obstacle?’. No evaluation of any kind is allowed in a ‘thinking-up’ session. If you judge and evaluate ideas as they are expressed, people will focus more on defending their ideas than on thinking up new and better ones. Everyone is encouraged to ‘think-up’ as many ideas as possible. ‘Wild’ or different
ideas should be encouraged even though they might sound foolish.
Participants should build upon or modify the idea of others.
How to do blue skies thinking? Seat the participants informally; Provide a flipchart pad or blackboard for recording ideas; State the problem or issue to be addressed; State the ground rules: for example, no evaluation of ideas is allowed, and no judgment as to worth; The more ideas, the better; strive for
quantity and build upon the ideas of others (combine, modify, etc.); Ask for ideas and record them as fast as they come – do not edit them; Encourage new ideas by adding your own; Discourage derisive laughter, comments or ridicule of any ideas; Discuss and evaluate the ideas generated.

12. Snowballing

Snowballing enables participants to think about their own responses and gradually reach out to those around them to consider the thoughts of others on an issue.
How to do snowballing? The teacher asks a question and/or poses a scenario and gives the participants a few moments to reflect. The teacher asks the participants to turn to the person next to them and discuss their thoughts (in pairs). Depending on the activity, the teacher may ask participants to prioritize their ideas, come to consensus on their top priorities, etc. (allow several minutes). Then the teacher   asks each pair to turn to another pair and discuss their thoughts (allow several minutes).

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USE OF DIGITAL TOOLS

The digital tools that are shown in this manual are specifically designed for the purposes of this project. Each resource – apart from the NFE tool – is enriched with a DT, which helps the students learn about a thematic area in a more fun way. Depending on the resource, the DT tool can be used prior, during or after the implementation of the activity (instructions are given in each resource).

The digital tools are uploaded on the project’s website (http://me-you-us.eu/en/activities-en/), where students can watch, play, learn, investigate through the use of films, online quizzes/questionnaires, interactive games, animation cartoon videos, prezi/ppt presentations etc.

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EVALUATION


Evaluation is the process of estimating the effectiveness of a program and it should be an integral part of the entire training and learning procedure. The evaluation deals with the extent on (a) whether the project as a whole meets its objectives, (b) to which specific methods are considered effective for the fulfillment of certain goals and (c) tips for upgrading the evaluated items so as to meet the users’ needs.
An evaluation is carried out in order to examine the following:

  • Appropriateness: Does the project cover the students’ needs, interests and anxieties?
  • Effectiveness: Does it fulfill the aim and objectives that it was designed for?
  •  Methodology: Are the methods applied on the specific team, the appropriate ones?
  •  Coordination: Does the team coordinator have the ability to communicate and work together with the team members in order to facilitate the learning process? Does he/she posses the right skills?

What is to be evaluated?

  • Content: Content is structured to meet students’ needs, interests and anxieties and ensure the aim and objectives are achieved.
  •  Organization and presentation: Information is organized logically and presented clearly using multiple methods and modes that motivate and increase openness to otherness as students engage in high interest, authentic activities.
  • Instructional design and support: Instructional design uses research-based instructional strategies, provides opportunities to engage in high interest, age-appropriate activities that mirror real-life situations, and make cross-curricular, global connections.

  • Equity and accessibility: Materials are free from bias in describing ethnic groups, gender, age, disabilities, cultures, religion, etc. They consider multiple learning styles and trainees’ cultural differences.

Within the "My Europe - Your Europe - Your Say" project evaluation will be carried out to examine the Teacher’s Manual (TM) and the Digital Tools Resource Pack (DT).

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Evaluation methods and strategies


Both students and teachers will contribute to the evaluation of this project by:

  • Self-observation, self-assessment and critical reflection: The project encourages critically reflective practice in all areas, including students and teachers as partners in the teaching and learning process. Teachers, having a reflective and critical approach to their own teaching practice, will evaluate both their teaching and the Teacher’s Manual and Digital tools. Methods of obtaining teacher feedback will be structured, semi-structured and unstructured. They will comprise surveys.
  •  Student evaluation and feedback: Student feedback is a rich and valuable source of information for both formative and summative purposes. For this reason, student feedback and evaluation are key components of the evaluation process. Methods of obtaining student feedback will be structured, semi-structured and unstructured. They will comprise surveys and student consultations.
  • Student assessment tasks and attainment of learning outcomes: The assessment tasks and other work that students produce in the course of their training is a valuable source of information about the teaching and curriculum design. They will be used for purposes such as refining the curriculum and teaching NFE tools, diagnosing problem areas and providing evidence of effective teaching.

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Teachers' feedback 

Analyzing the feedback it turned out that a diversity of answers apply to the activities, and their evaluation appears to be very positive. Role playing (stepping in someone’s shoes), discussions of everyday issues like grownups and the energizers and relaxation activities are definitely what teachers report to be the most liked activities in all trainings. Another trend is that both teachers and students rate very high the videos and presentations.

The teachers found the resources very challenging and their comments are encouraging, such as:

  • Students really enjoyed doing the activities!
  • The video ιn D17 is very interesting and raises the students’ awareness on diversity;
  • The videos in HR20 are very interesting; if only all lessons in class could be accompanied by such visual materials!
  • The implementation of the project resulted to better contribution to school activities;
  • The students were motivated and translated some of the resources from English to Greek;
  • The resources do not need modifications; guidance and explanation are clear;

The directions are clear and understandable. There is enough guidance and explanation of procedures for the teacher. The instructions couldn’t have been better!

  •  HR22, D4, D5, D8 and IC15  apply to real life situation;
  • Students presented the activity of D6 to the whole school for the world day of disabled
  •  Students created their own video related to the activity D17;
  • D15 is very useful for intercultural dialogue;
  • Apart from developing students’ social and civic responsibility and cultural awareness, which are the main objectives of the project, the training also contributed to improving students’ digital skills, e.g. in HR11 “all students were enthusiastic with the task of creating a video and processing it with Magisto; they suggested using the application for creating and editing video content in other subjects in their regular lessons.”

Quite naturally, not all teachers (and students) liked all the activities due to individual/ local community/ country specifics, e.g. Sexual orientation is reported not to be acceptable for Greek schools; discussing homosexuality with 11-year olds in a relatively closed community in a small town in Bulgaria proved to be a bit embarrassing for everybody, etc.

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The teachers suggested numerous modifications of the training resources related to distance

learning.

The authors of the resources and the partners’ teams discussed the suggested changes and issues and made the changes they consider relevant based on the teachers’ feedback. All technical issues have been resolved.

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Energizers



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Energizers otherness 1 - Break the Circle

The teacher assigns randomly a number to each student, depending on the group size, i.e. for 20 students, numbers 1-4 are ok, so each group has 5 people (groups could be synthesized by the students with the same number, i.e. all having been assigned number ‘1’ or by students where each one has his/her own unique number 1-4; similarly and more fun is grouping by ingredient for a Greek salad, where every student is i.e. ‘tomato’, ‘cucumber’, ‘onion’, ‘oregano’, etc.) Once the groups have been formed, they make  circles and the teacher randomly picks a number (or an ingredient) to step out of the circle and try to break in, while the others remaining are instructed to not let go of their hands no matter what. This can be repeated once more with another number stepping out.

Energizers otherness 2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Energizers otherness 3 - Amoeba

An evolution game! Everyone starts off as an amoeba, with the purpose of evolving to a human. All students walk around acting like an amoeba and when they meet with another amoeba, they play one round of rock/paper/scissors. Whoever wins evolves into a worm. When two worms meet they play again rock/paper/scissors and whoever wins turns into a wasp, but whoever loses goes back to becoming an amoeba. This continues until one becomes human. The evolution stages are: amoeba à worm à wasp à chicken à monkey à human.

Energizers otherness 4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Energizers otherness 5 - Good morning or evening

Everybody walks around the room greeting each other (as if everybody was their close friends) using words and gestures (shake hand, kiss, hug). Then they repeat the greeting in silence using only their eyes. When the exercise is over, the teacher asks students how did they feel with the two different ways of greeting (eg was it difficult, how did they manage to communicate, etc).

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Energizers otherness 6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Energizers otherness 7 - Connecting eyes

Participants stand in a circle. Each person makes eye contact with another person across the circle. The two walk across the circle and exchange positions, while maintaining eye contact. Many pairs can exchange at the same time, and the group should try to make sure that everyone in the circle is included in the exchange. Tip: Begin by trying this in silence and then exchange greetings in the middle of the circle.

Variations: If the teacher considers, knowing the class atmosphere, that some students might be left not participating, i.e. they try to make eye contact but nobody responds to them and they have no chance to move from their initial position, the moderator could divide the class in 2 groups and introduce a competitive element – after the activity each group will be marked on the ‘team spirit thermometer’ (which could be printed on a A4 paper and the teacher marks the degrees with a marker). The more people you have left not participating in the ‘eye contact’ activity – the lower the degrees to be marked on the thermometer.

Energizers otherness 8 - Find another seat:

Have the students sit on chairs in a circle, with the number of chairs being one less than the number of students. The student without a chair stands in the middle and tells their name. Then the student calls out a characteristic or a colour, or type of clothing, e.g. “Everyone wearing orange!”. All participants who are wearing orange must get up and find another seat, but not the one immediately to their right or left. The student in the middle races to find a seat and the person left standing becomes the next caller in the middle.

Energizers otherness 9 - Balloon pop

Have everyone form a circle. Instruct the participants to put one piece of information about themselves, e.g. I have 2 sisters, or my mother is called Samy,  on a small slip of paper, fold it, and put it in a blown up balloon. Throw the balloons in the middle of the circle and then have people take turns popping a balloon, reading the piece of paper, and guessing to whom the information applies. Participants could wander round the room asking ‘yes/ no’ questions to the other participants but not exactly the statement from the paper slip, e.g. they cannot ask “Have you got 2 sisters? But could ask “Have you got sisters?” and then “Have you got more than 1 sister?’, “Have got less than 3 sisters?”, etc. Game finishes when all participants have identified the author of the paper slip they have.

*Note: this exercise should be used if there is enough time.

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Energizers otherness 10 - Rope game

Have the participants stand on the middle of a space cleared of desks, chairs, etc. Divide the room in a way that allows them easily to move from one half of the room to the other, e.g. by placing a long piece of rope on the floor. The teacher stands at one of the ends of the rope and calls out a characteristic, or a colour or a letter, e.g.  “Everyone having blue eyes!”; “Everyone having 3 brothers”, “Everyone whose name begins with B”, etc. and points to the part of the room where the participants wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names have to move to. All participants who are wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names move to the respective part of the room; the ones who are not , have to go to the other part. Questions have to be constructed so that the class does not divide in groups having comparatively equal number of students, i.e. one of the groups should consist (in most cases) of one, two or few students. Debriefing: Participants are asked to share how they felt when they were part of a big group; and when they were standing alone (or were part of a very small group); what did they feel of themselves (as part of a small/ big group), and what their feelings were towards the group they were not part of.

Energizers otherness 11 - Alphabetical order

Students make a circle with the chairs, take off their shoes and get on the chairs (one per person - the circle needs to be as close as possible). Standing on the chairs and just moving from one to another one without getting off, students have to arrange themselves in alphabetical order according to their name. As soon as they are ready, teacher will check if they are right; if not they continue until they are right. 

Energizers otherness 12 - Body spelling

Teacher asks students to write their name in the air using different parts of their body, for example with the hand/leg/elbow/nose.

Optional: If time allows teacher asks to the class to spell out some words reproducing the letters with their bodies. Students can collaborate all together or can create different groups.

Energizers otherness 13 - Simon says

Teacher tells the group that they should follow instructions when he/she starts the instruction by saying “Simon says...”. If the teacher does not begin the instructions with the words “Simon says”, then the group should not follow the instructions! The teacher begins by saying something like “Simon says clap your hands” while clapping their hands. The participants follow. The teacher speeds up the actions, always saying “Simon says” first. After a short while, the “Simon says” is omitted. Those participants who do follow the instructions anyway are ‘out’ of the game. The game can be continued for as long as it remains fun.

Energizers otherness 14 - I am going on a trip

Everyone sits in a circle. Start by saying “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug”, and hug the person to your right. That person then has to say “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug and a pat on the back”, and then give the person on their right a hug and a pat on the back. Each person repeats what has been said and adds a new action to the list. Go round the circle until everyone has had a turn.

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Energizers otherness 15 - Animal roundup

The teacher tells to the class to silently think of an animal. Then he/she tells to the group that without talking, they need to arrange themselves on a line from largest to smallest animals. Group members can only make gestures and the noise of their animal. After they have finished, teacher ask to the students to say the animal they were supposed to be to see if the order is correct.

Energizers otherness 16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Energizers otherness 17 - Toaster or Rock Star

The group starts in a circle with one person in the center. The person in the center points at someone in the circle and says “Toaster” or “Rock star”.

  • If the person in the center says “toaster”, the person being pointed at needs to crouch down and jump up and say “butter me I’m done.” The people on either side should arms up and out strait creating a “toaster” around the person being pointed at.
  • If the person in the center says “Rock star”, the person being pointed at needs to hold his/her hands in front of their mouth as if he/she were singing into a microphone. The people on each side turn away from the person who’s been pointed at and pretend to play the guitar.

Energizers otherness 18 - Mosquito game

The group stands in a circle and the facilitator tells a story about a plague of mosquitoes and that everybody has to kill the mosquitoes so as they don’t get malaria. The facilitator puts up a mosquito on the head of a person who must lower in order to avoid the mosquito. The two persons next to that person must clap their hands above his/her head to kill the mosquito, but the mosquito escapes and it goes on. When the group is already doing the game well and quickly, the facilitator will add more mosquitoes until it is almost impossible for the group to catch as many mosquitoes.

Energizers otherness 19 - Grab the finger

In a circle, place right finger on next person s left palm.  Try to grab a finger before yours gets grabbed. After doing several times switch; place left finger on next person s right palm and repeat the process for a few times.

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Energizers otherness 20 - Chief of clan

Everyone stands in a circle. One participant closes his/her eyes or steps out of the room. He/She will have to guess who is the chief of the clan. One participant volunteers to be the secret Chief (quietly, so the "guesser" can't hear anything). The chief begins an action such as snapping fingers, patting the tummy, or slapping knees, and everyone in the circle imitates him/her.  The guesser returns to the room and tries to figure out who the chief is. As the guesser looks around, the chief changes the action avoiding being detected.

Energizers otherness 21 - Name game with balls

Students stand in a circle. The teacher gives a ball to one of the students. He/she holds the ball, then says the name of another participant and passes them the ball. After a few passes, the teacher adds one more ball in the game, and then – another one. This way there will be 2/3/4 balls in the air at a time and all participants will be calling each other’s names

Energizers otherness 22 - Names and adjectives

Participants stand in a circle; they think of an adjective to describe character or how they are feeling. The adjective must start with the same letter as their name, for instance, “I’m Maria and I’m merry”. Or, “I’m Alexander and I’m amazing.” As they say this, they can also mime an action that presents the adjective in a meaningful way. (N.B. In the national language versions of the TM there should be used popular names for the country and relevant adjectives in the respective language).

Variation (use if time allows): The game could also be used a memory game (concentration game) to check if the rest of the group has remembered the ‘name-adjective’ pairs. After several rounds (each participant repeating his name and adjective, the teacher/ a game master, checks if the group remembers the ‘names-adjectives’ fixed pairs by saying the name of one of the students, e.g. ‘Maria’; Maria steps forward to the middle of the circle and the rest of the group are expected to come up with the adjective previously linked to the name by saying “Maria is merry”. If they cannot guess, the participant in the circle (Maria) might mime again the adjective as a tip.

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Relaxing Exercises



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Relaxing Exercises otherness 1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Relaxing Exercises otherness 2 - Progressive muscle relaxation

To release tension from head to toe, students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each. The teacher guides the students; he/she asks them to start with the feet and toes, then move up to the knees, thighs, rumps, chest, arms, hands, neck, jaw, and eyes—all while maintaining deep, slow breaths.

Kelly Roper

Relaxing Exercises otherness 3 - Guided breathing

Teacher asks the students to close their eyes (if comfortable), inhale for a count of four, then exhale for a count of four (all through the nose, which adds a natural resistance to the breath). Then, with one hand on the chest and the other on the belly, the students can take a deep breath in through the nose and exhale through the mouth, ensuring this way that the diaphragm (not the chest) inflates with enough air to create a stretch in the lungs

Jordan Shakeshaft

Relaxing Exercises otherness 4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Relaxing Exercises otherness 5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

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Relaxing Exercises otherness 6 - Bee breathing

The teacher instructs the students to get in a comfortable position to practice bee breathing. They have to imagine that they are sitting on a leaf or a flower petal, to sit straight and allow the leaf or petal to gently support them.

The teacher gives students the following instructions:

Breathe in, allowing the air to just gently come in through your nose, filling up your lungs.

As you breathe out, buzz like a bee. See how long your buzz can last. See how far your bee is going to fly before sitting down and resting again. Buzz. Buzz. Buzz.

On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a loud, strong buzz.

On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a soft buzz.

When the exercise is finished, the teacher gives time for a short discussion:

Does it feel different with a strong or a soft buzz?

How does your body feel?

Optional (use if time allows): After breathing practice, draw a picture of a bumblebee and the leaf or flower that you were “sitting on” in your imagination. This picture can be used as a relaxation practice reminder. When you see the picture, practice being like a Bee on a leaf and practice a Bee breath.

Relaxing Exercises otherness 7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Relaxing Exercises otherness 8 - Seasons of the year

All players sit in a circle, but not too close to one another. The teacher moves like a plant during the seasons of the year.

Winter: the plants are small, weak and are crunched together on the ground.

Spring: through the stronger sunshine, the plants grow slowly and slowly rise.

Summer: through the warm sun, the plants slowly open their arms, the flowers open their blooms are stand up straight.

Autumn: the sun rays become weaker. The plants begin to slowly shrivel, the blooms and leaves begin to fall away.

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Relaxing Exercises otherness 9 - Lion's breath

Lion’s breath is a playful way to release and relax into more peaceful feelings. The trainer tells students that they are going to do a breath called the lion’s breath in order to let go of feelings or thoughts we no longer want. This breath is very helpful in getting those ideas out of us and pushing them far away.

Instructions

  • Imagine that you are a mighty lion. You have a giant roar!
  • Sit on your heels and sit up tall like a mighty, proud, lion. Get ready to let your roar go!
  • Think of a feeling or a thought that you would like to let go. Squeeze your hands into fists, holding tight and thinking of that feeling or thought.
  • Take a deep breath in and let your roar out, stick out your tongue at the same, stretch your arms out wide in front of you and open your hands wide, roaring out the feeling or thought and letting it go.
    • Repeat.

Relaxing Exercises otherness 10 - Mountain range

Stand side by side in a line, in mountain pose, your feet hip-width apart.  Each foot must touch the foot of the person on each side. Walk (as a group) across the room without separating their feet from your partner’s.
If the group comes apart, you must begin again.

Variation: Ask the students to walk on their toes.

Relaxing Exercises otherness 11 - Breathing exercise

Teacher asks students to make a circle and do the following exercises, repeating each one few times and alternate them. Teacher can also add new ones.

Breathing in raise your arms above your head and say “Elevator Up!”  Breathing out, float your arms back down to your sides, saying “Elevator Down.”  Repeat.

Take three quick breaths in while wiggling your nose.  Wiggle your nose on each breath in.  Then wiggle your nose on each breath out.

Hold your hand in front of your nose and hiss hiss hiss while breathing out.

Relaxing Exercises otherness 12 - Warm back

A piece of paper is stuck to each student’s back and they are given a pen. The paper is already prepared. Each piece of paper says: “I like………..”. Slow music is played and the students walk around and write characteristics about the person whom they like on the paper. Each child is allowed to look at the paper at the end and take it home.

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Relaxing Exercises otherness 13 - Body massage

The students stand in a circle: they need to follow all the movement the teacher does and massage themselves. The teacher starts to massage different parts of his/her body, starting from the head till the feet (it’s better if they take off their shoes). The teacher explains how the massage needs to be done, if delicate or more energetic.

Optional: The teacher can also ask to the students to massage another classmate.

Relaxing Exercises otherness 14 - Give me your energy

The students stand in a circle. The teacher starts, pretending he/she is holding a ball on the hands and passing it to the student on his/her right; this one do the same, until the ball comes back to the teacher. The ball needs to be passed in a gentle way, as it is very precious. At the second round, the teacher passes the ball to students in another side of the circle, making a gesture and a noise. The students will do the same until everyone will have touched the ball at least once.  The ball can be passed in any way (in form of kick, kiss…), pretending it becomes bigger or smaller depending on the will of the students. 

Relaxing Exercises otherness 15 - Moving like a toy

The teacher uses a magic word to change the students into many string-loaded (wind-up) toys. At the teacher’s signal, the toys start to move across the class, as many robots, to get their sits. They have to move more quickly at the beginning and then gradually more and more slowly, because their charge is finishing. Some of them will be frozen in the middle of the room, and the teacher has to give their cranks one more turn to help them reach their seats

Relaxing Exercises otherness 16 - Press the face

It is like the game "telephone" but instead of passing a word or sentence around the group, participants pass a facial expression.
The group forms a circle with everyone having their eyes closed, except the person who is passing the "face" in the first place. The passer will tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him, that person will open her/his eyes to receive the face. She/He will then tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him and pass the face along. Once participants have passed the face they may keep their eyes open to watch it move around the group. At the end, the original passer receives the face from the last person in the group and then shows what the original face was.
 

Relaxing Exercises otherness 17 - Circle massage

The group forms a circle and faces one direction. Each participant places his/her hands on the shoulders of the person in front of her/him. Each person then gives the person who is in front a shoulder massage. The person being massaged can give a feedback. After a few minutes, the group turns the other way so that the person who has been making the massage is then receiving it in return.

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Relaxing Exercises otherness 18 - Making room

Participants are asked to raise their arms with palms facing up, imagining that they are pushing up the ceiling and are asked do a lot of strength in that direction to increase the space of the room where they are. Then they are asked to turn the arms down with palms facing down thinking that they are pushing down the floor. They are asked to push away the walls turning their left arm and palm to the wall on their left and their right arm and palm to the wall that’s on their right.

Relaxing Exercises otherness 19 - Massage ball

One ball is given to each participant and, following the rhythm of a soft music, they place the ball between their back and a wall. They bend their knees slightly to relax the legs and better place their back. Then they move their body from top to bottom and from right to left and vice versa, moving the ball around their back. When making movements of their body, they will notice some more tense (and sometimes painful) spots. When they notice this they should stop and stay quiet keeping their back against the wall, making the desired pressure and holding for a while.

Variation: Do not use the wall. Participants work in pairs and one holds 1 or 2 balls in their hands and makes the massage to the other and then they switch.

Relaxing Exercises otherness 20 - Holding legs

Participants work in pairs. And you can put a quiet and relaxing music (or sounds like water falling down, sea waves, etc.). 

Half of the participants are asked to lie down face up, eyes closed, with their left leg extended on the floor and their right leg elevated. Another participant stands up and loops a towel around the heel of the other’s right foot and holds the ends of the towel in his/her hands, and makes soft and gentle movements (upwards and downwards, and sidewards) while the other totally relaxes his/her leg. Then they repeat the same process with the left leg. Then the participants switch roles.

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Activities



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Human Rights

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1 othernessHuman rights / My human rights are 30!
Developed by AENAO
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives
  • Introduction to human rights - 30 human rights according to UN (United Nations, 2016) http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Documents/UDHR_Translations/eng.pdf
  • Raise awareness on human rights
  • Realize that if one human right is missing, the person is incomplete (it is like a jigsaw; if one piece is missing, the jigsaw is incomplete).
Preparation

Suggested reading (United Nations, 2016) 

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/UDHR/Documents/UDHR_Translations/eng.pdf

Materials

  • Large Cardboard
  • Markers in different colors
  • Scissors
  • List with human rights
Introduction

"Human rights are like a jigsaw; if one piece is missing, the jigsaw is incomplete. This is the same for people living in poverty; take one of our rights away and you threaten them all. You can not give people their rights bit by bit and expect them to improve things for themselves bit by bit too."

- Young member of ATD Fourth World 

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Methodology

NFE Tool Jigsaw of Human Rights

  1. Students make a drawing on one side of the cardboard which represents: (a) one (or more) human right, or (b) a state of human right. (30’)
  2. They draw 30 jigsaw pieces on the other side of the cardboard and cut with scissors. (15’)
  3. Students write on each piece (in the blank side) one human right (simplified if necessary). If students are less than 30, then some of them write on 2 pieces. (10’)
  4. Each student reads loudly the human right that he/she has written and trying to explain what the meaning of the right is. (15’)
  5. Then they make the jigsaw using the drawn pieces. (10’)
  6. Teacher explains the importance of having all pieces in order to make a jigsaw. Similarly, the teacher explains the importance of all human rights to make a person complete. (5’) 

DT Video

Reflection

Reflection (from the teacher to students) in the plenary using the questions below:

  • did you understand the ‘human right’ on your piece?
  • what do you think it means to you in practice?
  • do you think human rights are important? Why (not)?
  • have you ever had the feeling your rights were being violated?
  • if one right is violated or is inaccessible for an individual what would be the effect on the individuals other rights?
Notes
Digital Resource

https://vimeo.com/166006062


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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2 othernessHuman rights / My right to anti-discrimination
Developed by AENAO
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     5 - Good morning or evening

Everybody walks around the room greeting each other (as if everybody was their close friends) using words and gestures (shake hand, kiss, hug). Then they repeat the greeting in silence using only their eyes. When the exercise is over, the teacher asks students how did they feel with the two different ways of greeting (eg was it difficult, how did they manage to communicate, etc).

Relaxing Exercises otherness     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • To become familiar with different groups of people
  • To raise awareness on anti-discrimination
  • To realize that diversity exists
Preparation
  • Suggested reading: Images HR2 Description.pdf
  • Materials: printed photos of different people Description (pdf) of images Download here
  • Tip: The file HR2 Description.pdf contains information on certain people in the photos. Their names are shown above the photos given.
Introduction

“No one is born hating another person because of the color of his skin, or his background or his religion. People learn to hate, and if they can learn to hate, they can be taught to love, for love comes more naturally to the human heart than its opposite.”

Nelson Mandela

Methodology

NFE Tool Team Work

  1. Students are divided into 3 groups of 6-8 students. Each group is given a set of photos and asked to put them on the floor in order (starting from the strongest person in hierarchy towards the weakest). Students must put photos in complete silence. Whoever disagrees with the hierarchy can change the order of the photo.            (15’)
  2. Then students visit each group. The group that “hosts” the rest of the class (who are in silence), explains the reason of their hierarchy. When explanation finishes, the rest of the class comments on the hierarchy/asks questions. The facilitator asks students (in all groups) how they feel about the hierarchy.

This procedure is repeated until all groups have presented their hierarchy to the class. (10’ for each group)

DT Video (Nansy Spetsioti)

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Reflection

When all groups are finished, facilitator presents to students some of the photos (eg Mother Teresa, John Young etc) whose descriptions are given in the Images HR2 Description.pdf file and ask the students:

  • How do you feel now that you know a little bit more about these persons?
  • Would you change the hierarchy now that you know more about them?
  • If you would change the hierarchy, what would you do different?                           (20’)
Notes
Digital Resource

YouTube Video

https://amara.org/el/videos/EYiqXhx2J640/info/anti-racist-short-film-jafar/ 


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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3 othernessHuman rights / My right to privacy
Developed by AENAO
Duration 80
Energizers otherness     1 - Break the Circle

The teacher assigns randomly a number to each student, depending on the group size, i.e. for 20 students, numbers 1-4 are ok, so each group has 5 people (groups could be synthesized by the students with the same number, i.e. all having been assigned number ‘1’ or by students where each one has his/her own unique number 1-4; similarly and more fun is grouping by ingredient for a Greek salad, where every student is i.e. ‘tomato’, ‘cucumber’, ‘onion’, ‘oregano’, etc.) Once the groups have been formed, they make  circles and the teacher randomly picks a number (or an ingredient) to step out of the circle and try to break in, while the others remaining are instructed to not let go of their hands no matter what. This can be repeated once more with another number stepping out.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives
  • To raise awareness on privacy issues as a human right
  • To realize why privacy is important
  • To consider ways to protect own privacy
Preparation
  • Suggested Reading:

Watch TED video (subtitles can be uploaded) about privacy:

https://www.ted.com/talks/glenn_greenwald_why_privacy_matters

  • Materials:

Teacher assigns the groups (without telling what each group is) a few days before the utilization of the exercise (this could be done when the previous section is over – if there is one). He/she asks the students to bring personal belongings when they implement the exercise:

Group 1. Photos, phones/tablets, keys, wallets.

Group 2. Favorite items kept in their bedrooms (eg a gift from someone, a piece of clothing that they really like, a photo).

Group 3. Favorite items brought in school (eg school bag, stationary, even a piece of clothing that they prefer to wear when they are at school).

Group 4. Each student brings one item to one of the members of the group (teacher assigns who brings an item to whom) as a gift. Each student that brings something must think what the other person would like (eg Mary gives John a hat, because John really likes hats).

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Introduction

Are we living in a world where privacy doesn't matter? One where our right to do what we want within legal boundaries is stymied by the incorrigible desire to spy on us and know exactly what we are doing at all times? 

Privacy matters and it is Valuable! Do not give away your life!

Methodology

NFE Tool Team Work

Students are divided into 4 groups of 5-6. Each group is assigned with a name related to personal daily issues/habits/errands. The groups are named according to what the students have brought:

Group 1. Facebook/Internet

Group 2. House

Group 3. School

Group 4. Friends

  1. When groups are fixed, students find a space in the room and form it as if it was their personal space. They create their boundaries, they can decorate it and they put in the middle the belongings that they brought.                                      (15’)
  2. When all groups are ready, teacher advices students to “build strategies” on (a) how to take things from other groups (maybe they need to decide what is worth taking and what is not) and (b) how to protect their own belongings.                        (15’)          
  3. Now the teacher allows students to try to take things from other groups; while at the same time they need to protect their own belongings.                                                 (15’)
  4. When the 15’ have passed, the teacher immediately stops the procedure and asks for the students to return to their groups with whatever they have rescued and/or taken. He asks the groups to present what they have accomplished.                 (15’)

DT  Animated Video

Reflection

Questions asked from the teacher to students in the plenary:

How did you feel

(a) when trying to take things,

(b) when trying to protect things,

(c) when accomplished to take things,

(d) when lost things?                             (20’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Animated video

https://vimeo.com/170397733 


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4 othernessHuman rights / Take a step! (My right to equity)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 80 min
Energizers otherness     10 - Rope game

Have the participants stand on the middle of a space cleared of desks, chairs, etc. Divide the room in a way that allows them easily to move from one half of the room to the other, e.g. by placing a long piece of rope on the floor. The teacher stands at one of the ends of the rope and calls out a characteristic, or a colour or a letter, e.g.  “Everyone having blue eyes!”; “Everyone having 3 brothers”, “Everyone whose name begins with B”, etc. and points to the part of the room where the participants wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names have to move to. All participants who are wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names move to the respective part of the room; the ones who are not , have to go to the other part. Questions have to be constructed so that the class does not divide in groups having comparatively equal number of students, i.e. one of the groups should consist (in most cases) of one, two or few students. Debriefing: Participants are asked to share how they felt when they were part of a big group; and when they were standing alone (or were part of a very small group); what did they feel of themselves (as part of a small/ big group), and what their feelings were towards the group they were not part of.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     14 - Give me your energy

The students stand in a circle. The teacher starts, pretending he/she is holding a ball on the hands and passing it to the student on his/her right; this one do the same, until the ball comes back to the teacher. The ball needs to be passed in a gentle way, as it is very precious. At the second round, the teacher passes the ball to students in another side of the circle, making a gesture and a noise. The students will do the same until everyone will have touched the ball at least once.  The ball can be passed in any way (in form of kick, kiss…), pretending it becomes bigger or smaller depending on the will of the students. 

Objectives
  • Raise awareness on inequality in word
  • Foster students empathy and solidarity for people with fewer opportunities
  • Develop in students the will to commit in fight against inequality in their context of life

Preparation

Materials

  • Role cards
  • List of situations
  • Optional: blindfolds and relaxing music

Tips

  • Make your own role cards, adapting the ones proposed as examples to make them closer to the world in which your students live.  
  • Make sure that the space in which you are running the activity is big enough: otherwise, move outside in a silent place.
Introduction

Article 1 (United Nations, 2016)

All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.

Despite what stated on the first article of the UN Human Rights Declaration, in reality the different situations in which everyone is born or live affect the opportunities we have access to, creating inequalities.

This activity is based on “Take a step forward” – COMPASS, Manual for human rights education with young people

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Methodology

NFE Tool Role Playing game. The activity is based on “Take a step forward” from “COMPASS” (Patricia Brander; Laure De Witte; Nazila Ghanea; Rui Gomes; Ellie Keen; Anastasia Nikitina; Justina Pinkeviciute, 2012)

  1. Create a relaxing atmosphere putting some music and asking students for silence.
  2. Start asking students if they have ever imagined being someone else. Ask for examples and introduce the activity explaining that they will be asked to put themselves in another person’s shoes. (5’)
  3. Give each student a role card and ask them to sit alone and reflect about the situation described in the card, without talking and keeping the secret about their identity, trying to enter in the character. Explain that even if they don’t know much about a person like this, they should just use their imagination. To help this process, students will put a blindfold or just close their eyes while the teacher will ask some questions to enhance imagination: they don’t need to answer, just think and imagine their own story. (15’)
  4. Students will be asked to stand in a line remaining absolutely silent. Teacher will explain that he/she will start to read some sentences and If the statement would be true for the person they are imagining themselves to be, then they should take a step forward. Otherwise they should not move. The teacher will read out the situations one at a time, pausing between each statement to allow the students time to step forward. Invite them to look around to see where others are. (10’)
  5. At the end of the activity, the students will have a visual representation of the inequality in the world. They will be invited to sit in the position they are: each one will describe its own role. After that, the teacher will count until 3 and the students will come out to the role.  (10’)
  6. Teacher will show a video http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/4/video1.html to further stimulate the final reflection. (5’)

Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary using the questions below (15’):

  • What happened in this activity?
  • How easy or difficult was it to play your role?
  • What did you imagine the person you were playing was like? Do you know anyone like that?
  • How did you feel, imagining yourself as that person? Was it a person like you at all? Do you know anyone like that person?
  • Relate the activity to issues of discrimination and social and economic inequality asking questions like these:
  • How did people feel stepping forward – or not?
  • If you stepped forward often, when did you begin to notice that others were not moving as fast as you were?
  • Did the person you were imagining move ahead or not? Why?
  • Did you feel that something was unfair?
  • Is what happened in this the activity anything like the real world? How?
  • What gives some people in our community more opportunities than others? Fewer opportunities?

Teacher will make students reflect about situation of inequality they live or they observe in their context and about possibilities to help people with fewer opportunities to make a step forward! What we can do to overcome situation of inequality in our everyday life? (15’)

Notes

DT – video "If the world were 100 people"   Produced and Written by Gabriel Reilich ; Animation by Jake Infusino http://jakemotion.com for GOOD Magazine

Digital Resource

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/4/video1.html


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5 othernessHuman rights / My right to gender equity
Developed by AENAO
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     20 - Holding legs

Participants work in pairs. And you can put a quiet and relaxing music (or sounds like water falling down, sea waves, etc.). 

Half of the participants are asked to lie down face up, eyes closed, with their left leg extended on the floor and their right leg elevated. Another participant stands up and loops a towel around the heel of the other’s right foot and holds the ends of the towel in his/her hands, and makes soft and gentle movements (upwards and downwards, and sidewards) while the other totally relaxes his/her leg. Then they repeat the same process with the left leg. Then the participants switch roles.

Objectives
  • To become familiar with the term “stereotypes”.
  • To raise awareness on male and female stereotypes.
  • To realize that there are stereotypes that could “exist” both in male and in female.
Preparation
  • Suggested reading

http://www.ohchr.org/EN/Issues/Women/WRGS/Pages/GenderStereotypes.aspx

http://www.healthguidance.org/entry/15910/1/List-of-Gender-Stereotypes.html

  • Materials: board or flipchart, markers, camera
Introduction

According to United Nations’ Sustainable Development Goals (SDG’s) http://www.un.org/sustainabledevelopment/gender-equality/, there are 17 SDG’s that can change our world during the following 15 years. Goal No 5 aims to Achieve gender equality and empower all women and girls. Even though European and developed countries are trying hard to apply gender equality, however there are many countries in the world where women are nowhere like men.

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Methodology

NFE tool Brainstorming, team work

  1. Teacher first asks students if they know what a stereotype is. Then he/she talks to them about stereotypes (what are stereotypes, gender stereotypes)                (5’)
  2. Teacher makes two columns on the board with the two genders and asks students to brainstorm about each gender stereotype: Male (Boy/man) and Female (Girl/woman).              (20’)
  3. Then children are divided into 4 groups. Two groups are dealing with the male gender and two groups with the female gender. They are trying to decide which gender stereotype they find stronger and they create a group pose with this stereotype. Someone is taking picture of these poses (could be either the teacher of any of the students).                                                        (20’)

*Optional: Students’ poses could be uploaded in the website

 DT Questionnaire

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

  1. if they have found any similarities between male and female stereotypes. Does it mean that the two genders are equal?
  2. what do they think they should change in the stereotypes so that two genders could become more equal.

(20’)

    

Notes
Digital Resource

https://goo.gl/forms/hTlGaqX3Yx0EgKeE3 


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6 othernessHuman rights / My right to equity and nationality
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • Introducing the human right to a nationality, officially recognized name, identity and citizenship.
  • Understanding that no one can deprive a person of his/her identity.
  •  Becoming aware that everyone who is illegally deprived of his/her nationality and identity has the right to protection.
Preparation
  • Suggested reading
  • Materials
    • Thick drawing paper or Cardboard
    • Colored markers
    • Handout
Introduction

The right to a nationality is one of the fundamental human rights. It ensures the equal opportunity for everyone to realize who he/she is, what his/her identity and citizenship is regardless of where he/she lives or his/her whereabouts at a particular moment of his/her life. Under no circumstances a person shall be deprived of his/her identity and nationality. Everyone’s nationality (citizenship) is very important for his/her identity. That is why it is recorded in the documents which prove he/she is a separate and unique personality (passport, ID card, etc.)

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Methodology

 NFE Tool Case study, Team work,  Discussion

  • Warming up discussion with students – basic questions:

Do you know anyone who doesn’t have a name? Why is a name important? Why, when meeting someone for the first time and after learning his/her name, do we usually ask where he/she comes from and what his/her nationality is?

 On what other occasions is nationality very important? (For example, when travelling abroad, when documents are issued, acquisition of property, working abroad, etc.) (10’)

The facilitator shows students the video and explains the essence of human right to a nationality, identity and citizenship. (10’)

On a thick drawing paper, the students write down key words or draw symbols which reflect the essence of human right to nationality and identity.(10’)

Individual work on case studies – each student is given the table containing case studies (situations) (10’)

Discussion in 2 small groups - students based on the individual work – the facilitator directs the students to elicit the reasons for their choice – why they agree or disagree with the described situations; what exactly they agree with; what they would do if they witnessed a situation in which someone doesn’t recognize another person’s right to a name and citizenship. (25’)

DT: video

Reflection

Reflection (from the facilitator to students) in the plenary using the questions below:

  • Why do all people have names?
  • What would happen if a person didn’t have nationality and citizenship?
  •  What does the expression “he is a citizen of the world” mean? If we describe someone as “a citizen of the world”, will it mean that this person lacks nationality and citizenship?                                   (5’)
Notes
Digital Resource

Handout: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/6_HR6 Handout.pdf

Video: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/6/HR6-Nationality_video.wmv


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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7 othernessHuman rights / I think, I believe (My right to conscience and religion)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 60
Energizers otherness     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     16 - Press the face

It is like the game "telephone" but instead of passing a word or sentence around the group, participants pass a facial expression.
The group forms a circle with everyone having their eyes closed, except the person who is passing the "face" in the first place. The passer will tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him, that person will open her/his eyes to receive the face. She/He will then tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him and pass the face along. Once participants have passed the face they may keep their eyes open to watch it move around the group. At the end, the original passer receives the face from the last person in the group and then shows what the original face was.
 

Objectives
  • to make students discover and reflect about different religions;
  • to develop understanding and deconstruct stereotypes about religions.
Preparation

Materials

  • Computer
  • Optional: Projector
  • Printed images and quotes
  • Flipcharts with names of religions Christianity, Islam, Judaism , Hinduism, Buddhism, others
  • Glue
  • Pens
Introduction

This activity aims to raise students’ awareness on the existence of different religions, make them reflect about similarities and differences between them and to deconstruct stereotypes, discovering the message of peace religion originally want to send.

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Methodology

NFE Tool – Association Game

  1. Students will be asked to connect different elements (images, symbols, artistic expressions, persons, places, quotes) with different religions. The teacher can decide to divide the students in two teams, distributing half of the images an quote to each group, or to leave them work all together, depending on their numbers.

The teacher will show the images and quotes which will be previously printed: the students will attach them on the flipchart in the column correspondent to the correct religion: Christianity, Islam, Judaism , Hinduism, Buddhism, others. 30’

  1. The teacher will show the video 10’

DT – The five major world religions - John Bellaimey – TED-ED – available at: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=m6dCxo7t_aE

  • Images and quotes to be printed
Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary using the questions below (15’):

  • Are you aware about the existence of different religions in the world?
  • Did you knew all of the ones we talked about during the activities?
  • Are you religious?
  • Do you know people from different religions?
  • What is your opinion on them?
  • Are you interested in the topic?
  • Do you think is important to talk about different religions? Why?
  • Would you like to talk more about it at school?
  • Do you think you know enough about it?
  • Do you think people from different religion can live peacefully together? Why?
Notes
Digital Resource

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/7/act7.html


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8 othernessHuman rights / Plus or Minus (My right to opinion and expression)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 80
Energizers otherness     5 - Good morning or evening

Everybody walks around the room greeting each other (as if everybody was their close friends) using words and gestures (shake hand, kiss, hug). Then they repeat the greeting in silence using only their eyes. When the exercise is over, the teacher asks students how did they feel with the two different ways of greeting (eg was it difficult, how did they manage to communicate, etc).

Relaxing Exercises otherness     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives
  • Reflect about the value of the right to opinion and expression;
  • Reflect about the existence of different perspective on a same topic;
  • Develop critical thinking;
  • Learn to respect the opinions of the others
  • Raise awareness on the limits to the right to opinion and expression.
Preparation

Materials

  • Adhesive tape;
  • Laptop
  • Papers or flipcharts
  • Optional: projector

Tips

The teacher can chose to change the statements proposed, focusing on a specific topic addressed by the class in that moment or more interesting for the class.

Introduction

This activity aims to make students reflect on the existence of different perspective and pros and cons on the same topic, developing their critical thinking, considering different opinions and learning to respect them. Students will understand the value of expressing their own opinion, experiment the feeling of being denied of such right.

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Methodology

NFE Tool : Plus or Minus Game

  1. With an adhesive tape, a long line will be marked on the floor, with a “plus” at one end and a “minus” at the other end.
  2. The teacher will start to read some statements and students will position themselves on the line, more or less close to the signs at the ends, depending if they agree or not on the statements and at which level.
  3. After each statement, teacher will ask to explain their position to some students, focusing on the ones with a more extreme position, trying to create a debate between different positions.
  4. The teacher will write down in different "pros and cons papers" the main results that emerged from the debate and will put them on the wall at the end of the activity.
  5. The teacher will choose always the same students to ask them to explain their point of views, ignoring the request of some others to express their opinion. (30’)

DT - Prezi with statements http://goo.gl/XhRgRu (or PDF) and video “Freedom of Expression” – Amnesty International - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/8/hrr8.html

Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary, showing the video and using the questions below (20’):

  • What happened in this activity?
  • How easy or difficult was to decide your position?
  • Do you ever consider it could exist are such different positions and opinions related to the same topic?
  • How easy or difficult was to explain and defend your positions?
  • Does it happen that you changed your mind about some issue, listening the opinion of the others?
  • How did you feel, having the possibility to express your opinion?
  • Is it important to you could do it?
  • In your daily life (at home, at school, with your friends), the other people normally ask your opinion?
  • Is there someone who felt bad during the activity? Why?
  • Did you feel that ignoring the opinion of someone was unfair? Why?

Possible follow-up:

If the students are particularly interested by the topic and into the debate, the teacher can introduce other stimulus to the discussion, focusing on the reasons why limiting freedom of expression may be needed to protect human rights. Suggested questions:

What if our freedom interferes or limits the freedom of the others? Is it right? Which is the limit to our freedom in relation with others? Is it right to limit the freedom of expression? In which cases?

Notes
Digital Resource

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/8/hrr8.html


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9 othernessHuman rights / My deepest dream (My right to freedom)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 80
Energizers otherness     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives
  • to reflect on the value of the freedom and its limits in relation with others
Preparation

Materials

  • Computer
  • Projector (optional)
  • Papers and pens

Suggested Reading

Reciprocal Maieutic Approach, pp. 19-28  (Dolci Amico; Amico Fausto)

Introduction

This activity is based in part on the methodology of Danilo Dolci’s Reciprocal Maieutic Approach. The Reciprocal Maieutic Approach (RMA) is a dialectic method of inquiry and "popular self-analysis" for empowerment of communities and individuals and it can be defined as a “process of collective exploration that takes, as a departure point, the experience and the intuition of individuals”. The RMA was developed by Danilo Dolci from the Socratic concept of Maieutic. Socrates’ Maieutics was unidirectional, while for Danilo Dolci the concept of knowledge comes from experience and a reciprocal relationship is necessary. As the name says, RMA is a “reciprocal” process between at least two persons and it is normally done inside a group, with one person that asking questions and others giving answers. It is the reciprocal maieutic communication that brings out people’s knowledge, with all participants learning from each other.

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Methodology

NFE Tool  Reciprocal Maieutic Approach

  1. Students will sit in a circle;
  2. Each one will say in turn his name and a characteristic which describe his character; (5)
  3. The teacher will ask to each students to think and talk about his deepest dream; (15)
  4. After that students will be asked to reflect on 3 obstacles which can impede them to reach their dreams and 3 things which can help them to do this. Each one will write everything on a paper and explain to the others; (15)
  5. The teacher will do the following questions, one by one and giving to all the possibility to talk:
  • What is “freedom” according to your personal experience? What does “freedom” means to you?
  • Describe a situation in which their freedom can interfere or limit the freedom of the others;
  • Is it right?
  • In which situation the freedom can/should be limited? (20)
  1. The teacher will show the video: Dreams of Freedom: in children's words (5) – Amnesty International UK

Reflection

1.  Strips of paper are distributed to students, who are asked to write on separate pieces of paper their views on the topics below with regard to the activities they completed as part of the project. It is not necessary for them to write down their names. The topics for evaluation can be the following:

• How I felt about our activities

• What I found to be interesting about our activities

• My positive views about our activities

• My negative views about our activities

• My recommendations

2. Students are asked to put their papers into a Box according to subject. (For example, starting with “I felt”…). The teacher can prepare previously different little boxes using packaging or colors boxes or similar or he/she can ask students to put the papers creating different little piles.

3. Students are asked to take turns picking a strip of paper from the box and reading out loud the statement written on it. If necessary, the viewpoint presented is discussed. The teacher can encourage discussion by asking questions.  It is necessary to ensure that everyone’s opinions are read out.  (15)

Notes

If you find the video a bit ambitious for the student's age, we sugest you to find alternative videos that can suit better.

Digital Resource

Dreams of Freedom: in children's words (5) http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/9/DreamsFreedom.mp4


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10 othernessHuman rights / My right to justice and law
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 55
Energizers otherness     12 - Body spelling

Teacher asks students to write their name in the air using different parts of their body, for example with the hand/leg/elbow/nose.

Optional: If time allows teacher asks to the class to spell out some words reproducing the letters with their bodies. Students can collaborate all together or can create different groups.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives
  • Reflect on the concepts of justice and law;
  • Develop argument skills;
  • Learn some important human rights related to justice and law according to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and European Convention on Human Rights.
Preparation

Suggested reading:

  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations, 2016)

http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/

  • European Convention on Human Rights (Europe, 2016)

http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf

  • Legal Dictionary (Farlex, 2016)

http://legal-dictionary.thefreedictionary.com

Tips:

  • For legal terminology, the teacher can use the legal free dictionary (Farlex, 2016), minding that some terms have some specific different meanings according to national systems laws.
  • In step 3, it’s good if the students come out with their own examples of situations they think are unfair.

Materials:

  • paper cards with the definitions of justice, law, judgement, penalty, tribunal, offence, crime, innocent, guilty. (Farlex, 2016)

Digital tool:

  • Justice and law human rights digital QUIZ

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Introduction

The law states the principles and regulations established by national or international authority and applicable to the peoples who live under the system which functions by the observance of these principles and regulations in the form of legislation, of custom and policies recognized and enforced by judicial decision. A tribunal is also called a court of justice because it is a place where justice is (supposed to be) administered.

Methodology

NFE tool: team work, word game and quiz

  1. The teacher introduces the activity briefly (by using some of the ideas above), divides the students in 2 teams and gives them paper cards with a short definition of: justice, law, judgment, penalty, tribunal, innocent, guilty. 5’
  2. The students have to guess the word corresponding to each definition.  10’
  3. Each team is asked to discuss 2 or 3 examples of an unjust situation that members of the team have experienced or witnessed. They choose one of the examples and present it to the members of the other team who have to say if they agree or not, justifying their answer by identifying the rules, principles or values according to which they consider (or not) the situation unjust. Then the teams switch roles.  20’
  4. In pairs, they are invited to play the digital quiz on the human rights related to justice and law and some differences between the Universal Declaration of Human Rights and the European Convention on human Rights. 10’
Reflection

10’                                                                

  • Do people always agree on what is just or unjust? Why?
  • Why do you think societies need laws and tribunals?
  • Do you remember one of the rights mentioned in the quiz? Which one(s)?
Notes
Digital Resource

Quiz - https://wordwall.net/resource/11388064

European Convention on Human Rights (Europe, 2016) - 

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/10_HR10_Convention_ENG.pdf

Paper Cards

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/10/CARDSHR10.pdf


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11 othernessHuman rights / My right to family
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     20 - Holding legs

Participants work in pairs. And you can put a quiet and relaxing music (or sounds like water falling down, sea waves, etc.). 

Half of the participants are asked to lie down face up, eyes closed, with their left leg extended on the floor and their right leg elevated. Another participant stands up and loops a towel around the heel of the other’s right foot and holds the ends of the towel in his/her hands, and makes soft and gentle movements (upwards and downwards, and sidewards) while the other totally relaxes his/her leg. Then they repeat the same process with the left leg. Then the participants switch roles.

Objectives
  • Discover and reflect upon different types of families, especially same sex families;
  • Get a deeper understanding of discrimination processes involving homosexual and bisexual families and the importance of developing recognition and respect for diversity;
  • Learn the laws of same sex marriage and adoption of children by same sex couples;
  • Identify social services and organisations that support families in local community.
Preparation

Suggested reading:

Tips:

  • Teachers can previously look for scientific articles on what are the new family types national laws on family (very different from country to country).
  • If students get excited with the activity, they can be invited to do a better edition of the film or do more takes to improve the argument or/and the performance of actors, scenario, etc.
  • To simplify, students can use their own phones to do this activity (especially if cameras are not available or not enough).

Materials:

  • Computers and internet for information research;
  • Cameras (or simple phones with cameras), tripods (if available but not essential);
  • Video projector.  

Digital tool:

  • Free simple software /application for quickly editing a movie like Magisto

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Introduction

Families are usually a source of care and emotional support for all members of the family, although this is unfortunately not the case in situations of all kinds of abuse like domestic violence and sexual abuse, that should be reported to specific social and protection services, since the “family is entitled to protection by society and the State” according to the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. Children of same sex families may not have the same opportunities of enjoying education in formal and non formal education contexts because of the unsafe climate created by peers and teachers related to discrimination based on sexual orientation and different moral standards.

Methodology

NFE Tool: Brainstorming, case analysis, role acting, artistic video production and presentation

  1. Brainstorming and discussion on what is a family for the students. 10’
  2. Students are divided in “research families” (groups of 3 or 5 elements) to look for sources of information and register information to deepen their knowledge about the topic. Each group is given one of the particular topics below. 20’
  • Characteristics of same sex families;
  • Human rights related to family;
  • State laws related to same sex families (marriage, adoption, social protection, etc.);
  • Organisations/services protecting families in local community.

Research families are then invited to put themselves in the shoes of a teenager who is a friend of a same sex family colleague who has just been mocked at school by a peer because he belongs to this type of non traditional family. Then they make a small and simple movie (maximum 2 minutes) representing the situation and the reaction of the same sex teenager’s friend. 20’

  1. Groups make a simple edition of their own movie, with the Digital tool mentioned above 20’
  2. Groups get together and show all their movies to everyone and after that reflect about the activity on the basis of the questions listed below. 20’
Reflection
  • Does the situation represented in your movie has any relation to situations we have witnessed in the school?
  • What can we do to respect article 1 of the Universal Declaration of Human Rights that states that “All human beings are born free and equal in dignity and rights. They are endowed with reason and conscience and should act towards one another in a spirit of brotherhood.”?
  • How do you or did you feel about this activity?
Notes
Digital Resource

Glossary of Terms Related to Sexuality and Gender (UCLA, 2016) - 

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/11_HR11.pdf

Free simple software for quickly editing a movie:

Magisto https://www.magisto.com


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12 othernessHuman rights / My right to social care and health
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     18 - Mosquito game

The group stands in a circle and the facilitator tells a story about a plague of mosquitoes and that everybody has to kill the mosquitoes so as they don’t get malaria. The facilitator puts up a mosquito on the head of a person who must lower in order to avoid the mosquito. The two persons next to that person must clap their hands above his/her head to kill the mosquito, but the mosquito escapes and it goes on. When the group is already doing the game well and quickly, the facilitator will add more mosquitoes until it is almost impossible for the group to catch as many mosquitoes.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     19 - Massage ball

One ball is given to each participant and, following the rhythm of a soft music, they place the ball between their back and a wall. They bend their knees slightly to relax the legs and better place their back. Then they move their body from top to bottom and from right to left and vice versa, moving the ball around their back. When making movements of their body, they will notice some more tense (and sometimes painful) spots. When they notice this they should stop and stay quiet keeping their back against the wall, making the desired pressure and holding for a while.

Variation: Do not use the wall. Participants work in pairs and one holds 1 or 2 balls in their hands and makes the massage to the other and then they switch.

Objectives
  • Analyse national and European Union statistical data of teenage pregnancy and birth rate among young women;
  • Reflect on the consequences of unwanted pregnancies;
  • Identify reasons that young pregnant teenagers and their partners might need and seek social and health care;
  • Know national and local institutions which provide social and health care for pregnant teenagers, that offer support and different aspirations

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Preparation

Suggested pedagogical resources and tips:

  • Universal Declaration of Human Rights (United Nations, 2016)

http://www.un.org/en/universal-declaration-human-rights/

  • European Convention on Human Rights (Europe, 2016)

http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf

Tips:

It’s important that the teacher does the research of the European statistical data (EuroStat, 2016) before the activity, because if the students do not find data, he/she can help them finding it or handles the data for them to analyse. See “Live births by mother's age” (EuroStat, 2016)

In schools, maths teachers can work with other subject teachers, using this activity to train the students competences to search and analyse statistical data.

The role of teachers in this activity is to encourage the discussion and guides the reflexion of the students avoiding to defend a particular solution for an unwanted pregnancy.

In step 5, if students don’t know any institution that provides social and health care, the teacher should provide it. These kind of institutions are different from country to country.

Materials:

  • Computers and internet for statistical data search.

Digital tool:

Introduction

The word protection and derived words occurs 10 times in the Universal Declaration of Human Rights. This is one of the most basic needs of humankind, especially children, old persons who have not the means of supporting their existence, and also more vulnerable persons who are disabled or have no food, no clothing, no house, nor money for paying for education or for health assistance and medicine when they are sick. Social and health care services are very important for protecting persons in unemployment situations and other difficult situations like teenager pregnancy. Good physical and mental health is one of the most important factors of our well-being, like love. According to this human right, medicines, hospitals, and other health services must be available, accessible (in time and cost), equitable and of good quality for all persons who need them.

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Methodology

NFE Tools: Data analysis and case discussion.

  1. The teacher introduces the topic referring to the concept of protection (based in the introduction suggested above).  5’
  2. The teacher gives the students the number of national annual teenage pregnancies and encourages them to look for data on the birth rate among women aged 15-19 in the 28 countries of European Union (EuroStat, 2016) and compare the data. Students can work in pairs. 20’
  3. Teacher starts a class debate by asking the following question: Do you think that a 15 years old teenager is prepared to have a child? Do you think she has the right to seek social and health care? Why? 10’
  4. The teacher asks students to consider a situation of a 15 years old teenager who discovers she is pregnant, has just talked to her boyfriend and he does not assume paternity. She doesn’t know what to do. Then students debate on what she could do in that situation, what they think would be the best solution and what consequences could each solution have. If students mention that the teenager could seek social and health care, the teacher asks why she would do it? If they don’t mention it, the teacher can ask if they think she could seek for it and why would she do it. 20’
  5. The teacher asks if the students know any national and local institutions which provide social and health care for pregnant young teenagers, that offer support in this kind of situation. If the students don’t know them, the teacher handles them information (name, address and brief description of main institutions). 5’
Reflection

Question to ask students at the end of the activity: 10’

Do you think it is important to talk about this subject at school? Why?

Notes
Digital Resource

European Convention on Human Rights (Europe, 2016) - 

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/12_EU_Convention_ENG.pdf

Outreach Program:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/12/Healthy_Babies.mp4


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otherness
13 othernessHuman rights / My right to education
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • Discover and reflect upon the differences and similitudes of formal education (FE), non formal education (NFE) and informal education (IF);
  • Identify and share personal real situations of learning experiences related to these different educative contexts and forms (FE, NFE, IE);
  • Discuss what are the qualities of a good educator and how difficult the educative process can be.
Preparation

Suggested pedagogical resources and tips:

  1. Informal education:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/video.html?lang=en&nid=24

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/video.html?lang=en&nid=29

  1. Non formal education:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/video.html?lang=en&nid=32

  1. Formal education:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/video.html?lang=en&nid=48

Materials

White Wall paper or board, post-it, computer, video projector.

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Introduction

In the Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the word “education” and derived words occur 7 times. The word “teaching” occurs only twice. It is important to distinguish teaching and education because human beings can learn without being taught. In some articles of this Universal declaration, the term “education” means formal education like in the first statement of article 26: “Education shall be free, at least in the elementary and fundamental stages. Elementary education shall be compulsory. Technical and professional education shall be made generally available and higher education shall be equally accessible to all on the basis of merit”. In some articles, the same term refers both to formal and non formal education. The educative process is very complex and does not only depend on the teaching at school. There are powerful educative situations and experiences that don’t happen in school.

Methodology

NFE tool: sharing life story/experience, team work game

  1. The teacher introduces the topic of the 3 different types of education, based on the information above, focusing on the idea that human beings can learn without being taught.   5’
  2. Watch the 3 movies about Informal Education (IE), Non Formal Edu cation (NFE), Formal Education (FE) and above mentioned and ask the question: What are these movies about? For starting a conversation on the differences of IE/NFE/FE. What are the differences and similitudes of the educative processes/situations between each movie? 10’
  3. Participants are invited to share 1 personal real situation of learning experience related to these different educative contexts and forms (FE, NFE, IE) or 1 situation they witnessed showing the difficulties to educate and teach, or 1 situation they know of lack of education opportunities. 15’
  4. Groups gather in 2 teams for playing the “best educator guessing game”. Each team writes down in a paper 10 words for 10 qualities of what is a good educator and sticks it in a large board or wall, and both teams read the qualities pointed by both teams. 15’
  5. Team 1 chooses one member of its team to begin representing by gestures one of the qualities of the good educator, according to the team (one of the words that the team has stick on the board/wall). The student has to represent the quality without talking, but has the possibility to ask the team mates to play a particular character. The students of the team rotate with each quality. Team 2 has to guess the quality that is being represented by team 1. Then, it’s team 2 that represents one of the qualities of a good educator according to the team’s perspective. And then it’s again team 1 that represents another quality and so on. The team that guesses more qualities of a good educator wins the game. (it works like the Pictionary technique, instead of drawing, students make gestures/drama representation). 30’
  6. Debriefing: use some of the questions mentioned below. 15’
Reflection

What do you think has the most powerful impact on you in this stage of your life: learning with friends, learning with family members, learning with teachers? Why?

What can we do so as educators are a bit more like we would like them to be?

What kind of qualities do you think you have similar to those of a good educator referred in the game you played?

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Notes
Digital Resource
  1. Informal education:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/video.html?lang=en&nid=24

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/video.html?lang=en&nid=29

  1. Non formal education:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/video.html?lang=en&nid=32

  1. Formal education:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/video.html?lang=en&nid=48


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14 othernessHuman rights / My right to work
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     20 - Chief of clan

Everyone stands in a circle. One participant closes his/her eyes or steps out of the room. He/She will have to guess who is the chief of the clan. One participant volunteers to be the secret Chief (quietly, so the "guesser" can't hear anything). The chief begins an action such as snapping fingers, patting the tummy, or slapping knees, and everyone in the circle imitates him/her.  The guesser returns to the room and tries to figure out who the chief is. As the guesser looks around, the chief changes the action avoiding being detected.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     20 - Holding legs

Participants work in pairs. And you can put a quiet and relaxing music (or sounds like water falling down, sea waves, etc.). 

Half of the participants are asked to lie down face up, eyes closed, with their left leg extended on the floor and their right leg elevated. Another participant stands up and loops a towel around the heel of the other’s right foot and holds the ends of the towel in his/her hands, and makes soft and gentle movements (upwards and downwards, and sidewards) while the other totally relaxes his/her leg. Then they repeat the same process with the left leg. Then the participants switch roles.

Objectives
  • Becoming aware that everyone has the right to work, free choice of work and favorable working conditions.
  • Understanding that everyone has the right to equal (fair) pay for equal work.
  •  Making students aware of ways to protect themselves from exploitation and to not allow anyone take advantage of them or force them to perform forced labor.
Preparation
  • Suggested reading (United Nations, 2016)
  •  Materials: printed cards with statements
Introduction

The right to work is a fundamental human right. Everyone has the right to fair payment for his/her work.  Everyone has the right to equal pay for equal work regardless of age, educational background, nationality or experience.

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Methodology

NFE Tool Team work, Debate game

  1. The students watch the video and then discuss how it reflects the right to work and fair payment. The facilitator encourages the students to give examples of other situations of infringed right to work and how we can possibly react if we witness such instances of infringement.         (15’)
  2. Students are divided into three groups of 5-7 people. Each group is given a batch of cards with different statements which reflect the right to work. The students in each group have to pick only the cards which are related to the right to work, present them to the other two groups and briefly explain why they have chosen them.         (15’)
  3. Debate – role play – “For and against employing children”

Students are divided into two teams:

  • № 1 – argue for children (young people)being hired
  • № 2 – argue against children (young people)being hired

A team of three students judge the debate and when it is over, they provide feedback on the teams’ performance according to the following criteria:

- the number of arguments supporting each thesis

- how convincing the arguments are

- clearly expressed viewpoints

- respect for the opposing team

Preparing for debate                                                                    (15’)

– each team work on their own and try to put forward as many convincing arguments as possible to support their thesis.

Meanwhile, the judges discuss how to evaluate the teams according to the judging criteria and draw up a special form to make notes.

Actual debate                                                                  (30’) 

– each team have three minutes to present a compelling oration on their thesis

- each team ask three questions to the opposing team. Each question requires an answer.

- Closing speech – (1’) for each team.

DT: video (Youth for Human Rights) batch of cards

Reflection

Questions to ask students at the end of the debate:

  • Does the thesis which your team had to support match your personal opinion on the issue?
  • Describe your feelings while you were presenting your arguments?
  • What did you like about the arguments of the opposing team?
  • What would you do if someone forced you to work or you didn’t get fair remuneration for your work?                                                             (15’)
Notes
Digital Resource

Printed cards: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/14_HR14 printed cards.pdf

Video: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/14/HR14.mp4


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15 othernessHuman rights / Living Democracy
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 120
Energizers otherness     7 - Connecting eyes

Participants stand in a circle. Each person makes eye contact with another person across the circle. The two walk across the circle and exchange positions, while maintaining eye contact. Many pairs can exchange at the same time, and the group should try to make sure that everyone in the circle is included in the exchange. Tip: Begin by trying this in silence and then exchange greetings in the middle of the circle.

Variations: If the teacher considers, knowing the class atmosphere, that some students might be left not participating, i.e. they try to make eye contact but nobody responds to them and they have no chance to move from their initial position, the moderator could divide the class in 2 groups and introduce a competitive element – after the activity each group will be marked on the ‘team spirit thermometer’ (which could be printed on a A4 paper and the teacher marks the degrees with a marker). The more people you have left not participating in the ‘eye contact’ activity – the lower the degrees to be marked on the thermometer.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     8 - Seasons of the year

All players sit in a circle, but not too close to one another. The teacher moves like a plant during the seasons of the year.

Winter: the plants are small, weak and are crunched together on the ground.

Spring: through the stronger sunshine, the plants grow slowly and slowly rise.

Summer: through the warm sun, the plants slowly open their arms, the flowers open their blooms are stand up straight.

Autumn: the sun rays become weaker. The plants begin to slowly shrivel, the blooms and leaves begin to fall away.

Objectives
  • Get the idea of living in a democracy;
  • Learn what the right to democracy in everyday life is;
  • Practical steps to democratic ways of managing a class/ school;
  •  Support students in understanding and standing up for their right to democracy.

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Preparation

Suggested reading and tips

  1. History of Democracy
  2. The topic might seem not very appealing to students. That is why the specific objectives of Living Democracy are to be achieved through activities that take into account students’ age and routine school and family life activities.
  3. Tips:
  • for activity 2: Possible situations that could be presented *:
    • Establishing class/ school rules of Dos and Don’ts;
    • Punishing a student who has broken class rules;
    • Taking part in a school competition (decision-making process - whether or not to take part, pros and cons, etc.)
  • for activity 3:
  • In case student government exists in the school, the activity is to be modified and comprise an overview of existing practices and suggestions for changes.
  • The activity is linked to Active Involvement Module and could be used as a preparation or a bridge to Active Involvement  activities.
  1. Preparation for activity 2.3: There should be one computer for each group. If this is not possible, the pictures could be printed (one pack of pictures per group).
  2. Digital tool resources: HR15_1, HR15_2, HR15_3, HR15_4.1, HR15_4.2*. It is highly recommended to download the digital resources in advance and use them in offline mode.

* the provided examples are to be used in case students need some tips or encouragement to think of situations from their everyday life.

** When trying to open HR15_3.swf file, there appears a message warning that the file might harm your computer. The reason for this message is that the settings of the most common browsers have been set not to open SWF files by default because they are not quite common. This is why users are asked to agree to open swf files, which you have to do by choosing the option KEEP. The file will cause no harm to you computer.

Introduction

What is a democracy? A form of government, for sure, but it is much more than that. Democracy happens when citizens have a say in decisions and governance. Democracy could be observed in the ways citizens organize themselves in order to make decisions or accomplish goals. Democracy has manifestations in the organization of our everyday life – in families, schools and local communities.

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Methodology

1. Guided introduction (HR15_1)                                                               15’

  • Democracy - basic characteristics – video presentation; NFE tool -  Discussion;
  • Democracies and non-democratic regimes – video presentation; NFE tool - Brainstorming.

2. Democracy in everyday life; NFE tool – Role play, Interactive computer game.                                                                                                   50’

Students are divided in groups of 4 or 5 and are asked to think of an imaginary class/ school which applies or does not apply the right to democracy in its everyday life. Each group is to come up with a short plot which demonstrates that school/ class life is being organized/ managed in a democratic way (or is not – depending on the assigned task HR15_2).

  • Discussing ideas for the plot and rehearsal (drama) – 25’
  • Performing the sketches to the rest of the class (drama) – 15’
  • Story telling (interactive activity: jumbled pictures) – 10’ (HR15_3) Students work in groups with the task to put the pictures in a meaningful sequence to illustrate a Living Democracy; when they are ready, they tell their stories to the class.        

3. Election experience (preparation for school elections simulation);NFE tool -Team work, Simulation.                                                                                          30’

  • Students are divided in 3 groups and discuss the idea of class life organization aimed at providing conditions for the well-being of all students, the responsible organ (e.g. class government) responsibilities, tasks and rights (HR15_4.1 – tasks’ worksheet, HR15_4.2 - example) – 15’
  • Groups present and compare their ideas and concrete lists with action plan activities, rights and responsibilities – 10’
  •  Voting for the best Class Government programme– 5’.
Reflection

Guided reflection:                                                                                               15’

  • What is the major characteristic of organizing life in society in a democratic way?
  • Do you think life at all different levels is to be organized considering to the right to democracy, e.g. school and class life; family life, etc.? Why not? Why yes?
  •  If you could vote, would you? Why yes? Why not?
Notes

Suggestions for organizing the training activities in case of distance learning:

Activity 2 Democracy in everyday life: Students are divided in groups and each group is assigned a room in ZOOM where they can discuss the plot separately from the other groups. You can watch the video tutorial how to create different rooms in a ZOOM session and to assign the rooms to the groups.

Activity 3: Election experience

1. Create shared Google docs for each group copying the topics each group needs to discuss and come up with their election programme (support doc HR15_4.1). 

OR

2. Create rooms in ZOOM, where the students could discuss their election programmes and put their ideas in the document (support doc HR15_4.1) - one representative puts down the shared ideas.

Digital Resource

Human Rights:  http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/15/HR15_1_RI/index.html

Support documents HR15_2, HR15_4.1 and HR_4.2:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/15_HR15_2-HR15_4.1-HR15_4.2.pdf

Jumbled pictures Activities HR15_3: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/15/HR15_3.swf


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16 othernessHuman rights / Globetrotters - My right to move within and out of the borders of each country
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 100
Energizers otherness     14 - I am going on a trip

Everyone sits in a circle. Start by saying “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug”, and hug the person to your right. That person then has to say “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug and a pat on the back”, and then give the person on their right a hug and a pat on the back. Each person repeats what has been said and adds a new action to the list. Go round the circle until everyone has had a turn.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives

Students will learn:

  • what the Right to freedom of movement is about;
  • why is it important in open democratic societies;
  • how it is related to other human rights.
Preparation

Preparation

  • Computer, beamer and projector screen for activities 1.1 and 4.
  • Print HR16_2 (map) and HR16_3 (messages for the treasure hunt)
  • Magazines/ photos of various landmarks/ landscapes from round the world, glue, scissors, cardboard, etc.);

Suggested reading:

http://www.claiminghumanrights.org/freedom_movement_definition.html http://www.youthforhumanrights.org/what-are-human-rights/videos/freedom-to-move.html

Digital tool: HR16_1, HR16_2 (map), HR16_3 (messages), HR16_4 (emblems for the different lands Globetrotters visit in activity 3), HR16_5 (video  - the treasure)

The project team kindly requests the teachers participating in piloting HR16 to record the artistic works of the students (dances, songs, paintings, sketches, etc.). The recordings could be used in the national dissemination events and the future version of the teacher’s manual as models/ tips to the students in other countries or towns when they do the same training.

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Introduction

Freedom of movement plays a vital role on promoting peace and establishing a world which shares the common values of equality, democracy and respect for all human beings. It encourages tolerance and understanding among people of different cultures. It can help to break down harmful stereotypes and prejudices and to build solidarity between people and governments of different countries.

Methodology

Introduction in the topic - NFE tool: Discussion.                                           15‘

  • Brain teaser: students watch the video HR16_1;
  • Introduction: what the ‘Right to free movement’ is about - Everyone has the right to freedom of movement and residence within the borders of each State; Everyone has the right to leave any country, including his own, and to return to his country;
  • Discussion: what is freedom of movement for you? Do you think it is an important human right – why ‘yes’/ why ‘not’?

Globetrotters - NFE tool: Role play game. Students play a game similar to ‘Treasure hunt’ in which they present their ideas of how traveling and free movement contribute to building a world of peace and understanding through artistic means.                                                    65'                

  • Students are divided in 6 groups according to their wishes, talents, artistic skills, etc.: Group A – actors; Group B – artists; Group C – musicians/ singers; Group D – poets/ writers; Group E – dancers; Group F – locals. Groups A to E comprise 2 or 3 students; Group F – the remaining students (the teacher/ moderator outlines the Globetrotters game) - 5’
  • Groups A to E have the task to create a piece of art which is topically related to the benefits of traveling as a means of building values like tolerance to cultural diversity and peace e.g. group A creates a short sketch presenting the story of a girl going to foreign country, she is hostile to local people and lonely as she has no friends and does not understand the language, but later things change etc.; group B might draw a picture/ make a collage of attractive destinations; group C compose a rap(or any other style) song; group D write a text (poem or fiction); group E – dance modern or national dances from their home country or other cultures, etc. – 25’
  • Playing the game: to be organized as an extramural activity (preferably). Groups A to E are the Globetrotters. Group F goes to the game grounds (destination 1). Globetrotters get a map (HR16_2) with a treasure marked on it, and instructions (message1 – HR16_3); they go outside and see a place marked (HR16_4 – emblems) with the sign from message 1 and group F standing there. Globetrotters ask for the next clue but the Fs wouldn’t cooperate, so they have to be convinced that travelling and visiting places different from the usual places you reside, is a good thing for both travelers and locals. However Globetrotters and Fs do not speak the same language, so they can only communicate through artistic means. Globetrotters have to guess which is the most suitable way to do that as the Fs at the different destinations would be convinced by a specific art forms only (e.g. BOOKlandia is the land of writers, so Fs would understand only group D artistic product). If the Fs are contented with the artistic product of the Ds, they give message 2 (HR16_3) to the Globetrotters with instructions to go to destination 2. The Fs move to destination 2 (ECNADLandia – DanceLandia ) and provide tips to suggest what their land is (e.g. by dancing); again they wouldn’t give message 3 to the Globetrotters unless they are convinced to do it. As suggested by their actions, they are the land of the dancers, so it is now the turn of the Es to convince them. The procedure continues until Globetrotters reach destination 5 and find the treasure (a video resenting beautiful places to visit in Bulgaria HR16_5) – 25’
  • Globetrotters and Fs watch HR16_510’

69

otherness
Reflection

Guided reflection:                                                                                            10’

  • Have you visited other towns/ countries? How did you feel? Were there some surprising things you saw there? What do you think about the people who live there?
  • Would you like to travel to other countries and towns when you grow up? Why ‘yes/ why ‘no’?
  • Would you go to live in another town/ country? Why ‘yes’? Why  ‘no’?
Notes

References:

The following CC videos were used to create HR16_1 resource:

For HR16_5:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=KIN6Y9m_37Q

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=zb08YFnLYTU

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XgYAhTTG684

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ecXai7zVQ4o

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=GfIDykYC9Go

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Vun_fiWtzE4

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=Ug-xA7QnTOQ

Digital Resource

HR16_1 http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/16/HR16_1.mp4

HR16_2 (map), HR16_3 (messages), HR16_4 (emblems for the different lands Globetrotters visit in activity 3): http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/16_HR16_2-HR16_3-HR16_4.pdf 

HR16_5 (video  - the treasure):  http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/16/HR16_5_Hidden_gems.mp4


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

70

otherness
17 othernessHuman rights / Welcome, refugees!
Developed by ISJ Dolj
Duration 80’
Energizers otherness     20 - Chief of clan

Everyone stands in a circle. One participant closes his/her eyes or steps out of the room. He/She will have to guess who is the chief of the clan. One participant volunteers to be the secret Chief (quietly, so the "guesser" can't hear anything). The chief begins an action such as snapping fingers, patting the tummy, or slapping knees, and everyone in the circle imitates him/her.  The guesser returns to the room and tries to figure out who the chief is. As the guesser looks around, the chief changes the action avoiding being detected.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives
  • To become familiar with the issue of people's migration and the factors that influence it.
  • To realize that migration is an issue of the contemporary world.
  •  Students will identify possible solutions to the migration issue.
Preparation

Required materials: computer/laptop, projector, sheets, pens, markers or colored pencils

NFE methods: debate, team work, arts creations

Introduction

Armed conflicts that exist in different parts of the world are a constant danger to the civilian population, which often has no means of defense against the combatants. Moreover, there is a risk that civilians may be subjected to various abuses and persecution by combatants for various reasons. As a result of these situations, many people, sometimes millions, choose to leave their home and even the country in search of a better, safer life.

Methodology

NFE methods: debate, team work, arts creations

  1. The teacher asks the pupils to imagine that they are in the most beautiful place they have ever seen in world and they have to say what they feel. Then the teacher asks the pupils to imagine that place has been affected by war and that it has disappeared or it has become unrecognizable, and then they have to express their thoughts and feelings.
  2. The teacher asks students to watch the video and discuss the following issues: What did you feel while watching the story in the video? Did anything surprise you in the story? What is the main reason because of which they had to leave their country? Put yourself in the shoes of the people in the video. What would do? Would you leave or stay in your home country? Why would you make this decision? Have you decided easily? If you decided to leave your home country, how would you prepare? How would your decision affect others (family, friends, community)?  20'
  3. The teacher uses the presentation to explain to students the term "refugee" and to distinguish it from other terms, such as "tourist" or "immigrant".                    10'
  4.  The teacher co-ordinates a campaign in the school aimed at raising awareness about the problems the refugees face and making the school community accept and support refugee students. Pupils are split in groups of 4 or 5 and, considering their artistic talents, they are asked to make drawings, slogans or posters on the topic: ”I am only a child, yet I know: the refugees are my sisters and my brothers!” Drawings, posters, slogans and posters made by students are to be displayed in the school.                      
Reflection

After the pupils have completed their activity, the teacher discusses with them the following questions:

  • What should be the people's attitude toward refugees?
  • What should be changed in people's behavior towards refugees?
  • How would you help a refugee?
  • What should the state do for the refugees?
Notes

In case of delivering a distance learning training session, activity 4 could be modified as follows.

1. The teacher organizes an extra training session in which students watch the video tutorial how to work jointly on a presentation making use of Google slides

2. Activity 4, in which students have to plan a campaign and design a poster on the topic, can be completed with each group creating their presentation (in case this is a poster, the presentation will comprise only 1 slide with all the students from the group working jointly to create it.

Digital Resource

Video: „Welcome, refugees !” https://youtu.be/dF371sx4xUY

Presentation: „Refugees, immigrants, tourists” https://youtu.be/E7SytRZPmd4

Video tutorial how to work jointly making use of Google shared slides


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

71

otherness
18 othernessHuman rights / My right to say no to hate speech
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva | Ana Torres | Maurício D
Duration 2 x 45m
Energizers otherness     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Objectives

To know the Movement Against Hate Speech;

Identify and analyze examples of hate speech in your country;

Select one of the identified hate speeches, reflecting on how to counter this specific discourse;

Produce posters of the Movement Against Hate Speech, to be published in the newspaper / school website or in local social media, and send them to the European Campaign Against Hate Speech platform (https://www.coe.int / en / web / no-hate-campaign).

Preparation

Preparation:

Search for and read recent letters and / or recommendations on human rights.

Read information available on the European Platform Against Hate Speech (https://www.coe.int/en/web/no-hate-campaign).

Tips: the activity will greatly benefit from the organization of an interdisciplinary articulation with teachers in the areas of education for citizenship, visual education and languages.

Materials: Computer, internet, video projector.

Digital Tool:  PowToon film explaining what is the Movement Against Hate Speech, disseminating the idea of how important it is to be involved in the defense of human rights, as a way to support people and groups suffering from hate speech, but also to promote reflection on why the people utter and disseminate such discourses: https://www.powtoon.com/c/e7ZuEHM8KZl/1/m

Introduction

Hate speech is a form of intolerance and xenophobia, widespread on the internet, to reach groups or individuals because they are different and more vulnerable in all sorts of ways.

It is important to educate and mobilise youngsters to observe human rights, identify and expose prejudice, dismantle hateful narratives and propose alternatives that challenge them critically, and deepen understanding between humans.

This activity offers the possibility to get to know the No Hate Speech Movement, a Council of Europe youth campaign for human rights.

Methodology

FIRST SESSION (45 minutes)

The facilitator presents the Council of Europe's official definition of hate speech as well as the essential information to characterize the Movement Against Hate Speech (15 minutes), based on the website https://www.coe.int/en/web/no-hate-campaign

After showing the film (3 minutes), the facilitator divides the big group in pairs (two person groups), stating that each pair member should respond individually to a different challenge in the first session but work together in the second session. The facilitator gives a small paper to each element of the working pair with the following tasks:

Task for 1 person of the pair: search, on the internet, posters on human rights, reflecting on the characteristics of a publicity poster, having as reference the following questions: What human rights are involved?; ii) What ideas suggest the illustration and the text; iii) What is the key idea of the poster?; iv) How does the image articulate with the text?

Task for 1 person of the pair: search, on the Internet, examples of hate speech in your country, and reflect on them by answering the following questions : i) What is said in the hate speech?; ii) What human rights are involved?; iii) Who is the author of the speech? iv) What people or groups do you think the speech wants to reach? v) What problems does this discourse pose for democracy and peaceful coexistence among people?

The facilitator supports the research process, if possible with the collaboration of a librarian and/or other teachers. (25 minutes)

The facilitator proposes to the participants in this activity (2 minutes) that, by the next session, each pair will jointly develop an idea to create a poster for the Movement Against Hate Speech, based on an example of their country's hate speech and one (or more) ways to combat it, reflecting on the following issues: i) what slogan could describe the Movement?; what is the hate speech selected for the poster?; what are the key ideas to combat it?; what other elements might the poster include?

SECOND SESSION (45 minutes)

The participants create the poster in digital format (35 minutes) using the program https://crello.com/en/create/posters/

If, for some reason, they are not able to use this program, they can opt for another one or even make the poster in paper format, but in all cases taking into account the following aspects: Use verbal and pictorial language (text and image); Create a very short and suggestive text to explain what the Movement is (suitable to the target audience); Create a slogan for the Movement; Watch over the harmony between sizes and types of letters and images, spacings, colors; Use a text color that contrasts strongly with the background color(s) to make it easier to read the poster; Try to use metaphors; Sign the poster.

The Facilitator does what must be done to have the posters published in the school newspaper/website and/or in local social media, and to have the posters sent to the European Campaign Against Hate Speech (https://www.coe.int/en / web / no-hate-campaign). You can also arrange with the group an exhibition of the posters in the School or another institution of the community where the school is located.

Depending on the contents to work or skills that interest most to develop, it is possible to substitute the elaboration of poster by the making of a film, using the mobile phones; or a cartoon, using the programhttps://www.storyboardthat.com/, with the possibility of publishing them in the same media mentioned above.

Reflection

The facilitator talks with the students about what they learned, using some of the following questions (10 minutes):

Did you know the Movement?

Can everyone be involved in the defense of human rights?

Has this activity changed your perspective on human rights?

What are the target audiences of your posters?

Why is it important to reach these audiences?

Do you think that the publication/dissemination of the posters could be a form of action and mobilization in favor of human rights?

Notes

Depending on the contents to work or skills that interest most to develop, it is possible to substitute the elaboration of poster by the making of a film, using the mobile phones; or a cartoon, using the program https://www.storyboardthat.com/, with the possibility of publishing them in the same media mentioned above.

Digital Resource

Digital Tool:  PowToon film explaining what is the Movement Against Hate Speech, disseminating the idea of how important it is to be involved in the defense of human rights, as a way to support people and groups suffering from hate speech, but also to promote reflection on why the people utter and disseminate such discourses: https://www.powtoon.com/c/e7ZuEHM8KZl/1/m


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

72

otherness
19 othernessHuman rights / The Right to Public Assembly
Developed by University of Social Sciences
Duration 90 min.
Energizers otherness     17 - Toaster or Rock Star

The group starts in a circle with one person in the center. The person in the center points at someone in the circle and says “Toaster” or “Rock star”.

  • If the person in the center says “toaster”, the person being pointed at needs to crouch down and jump up and say “butter me I’m done.” The people on either side should arms up and out strait creating a “toaster” around the person being pointed at.
  • If the person in the center says “Rock star”, the person being pointed at needs to hold his/her hands in front of their mouth as if he/she were singing into a microphone. The people on each side turn away from the person who’s been pointed at and pretend to play the guitar.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • To understand social necessity to gather people with the same goals or interests;
  • To know and understand the restrictions of public gathering;
  • To know the laws concerning the right to assembly;
  • To have skills to plan the public assembly with all necessary conditions.
Preparation

Tip: It is important to let the students have their own ideas, but to moderate any activities and discussion towards social activities, not individual ones. It is important to emphasize, that people are social human beings that require others for successful and effective acting.

Materials: Papers, post-it notes, projector connected to computer.

Digital tools: Presentation about the right to assembly (HR19_RTA)

Introduction

We all have the right to meet our friends and to work together in peace to defend our rights. Nobody can make us join a group if we don’t want to. But sometimes we need to make concessions in order to work together, as being together can help us to achieve our common goals.

Methodology

NFE tools: brainstorming, role-playing game, simulation, team working, problem-based method.

  1. Divide the students in such a way that you could make groups of ca. 4 people (e.g. if there are 24 students in the class then you will have 6 groups of 4, if 25 – 5 groups of 5, etc.). Let the students count to the divisor, and those with 1 will be “ones”, with 2 “twos”, etc. Try to divide the class as much accidentally as it is possible (by counting according the place of seating or by placing the students in a row).
  2. Give to each group the same task: Answer two questions:
  • What do we have in common?
  • Why do we like each other inside the group?                                         10’
  1. Divide the class into several groups of 3-6 students. Let the class do the division considering who they like, i.e. they decide what group they want to be in. The groups don’t have to have the same number of persons, but they should not exceed 6 persons.
  2. Give now, the same tasks: answer two questions:
  • What do we have in common?
  • Why do we like each other inside the group?                                                    10’
  1. Make a reflection: which case was easier? Why is it important to have freedom of who you want to have around you                                                                        5’
  2. Let everyone in the class write down on a piece of paper ONE wish to the teacher. Now, let everyone read their wish. Are they similar/ the same? If they are not, ask the class how many students want the specific wishes as well? What can we do in order to make the teacher fulfil the wishes?

It is important for the teacher to suggest, that the wishes should be possible to be fulfilled and if the wishes are similar it is easier to stand as a group with one common wish than to have a lot of people wishing different things. And explain that if we wish something in the group, we should take into consideration if the group want the same as we do, or we shall stand against the group with our wish. This is the meaning of assembly.                                                   15’

  1. Show the presentation from digital tools (HR19_RTA) and explain the right to assembly and the conditions that must be met to organize the assembly.            10’
  2. Now, divide the class into three groups. Each group is given a role and a task. Each group doesn’t know the roles and tasks of the other groups. One of them will be a dog-lover group, another cat-lover group and the third one will take the role of Municipality.

Group 1, the group of “Cat-lovers”: they want to express their love for cats and propose laws to empower cat owners. They informed the municipality about the demonstration they plan at noon at the front of the town hall. But the group was refused by the municipality as they can frighten the tourists, so they were proposed to gather at the suburbs in a park 10 km east from the center of the town. The task for the group is to write a complaint to the municipality and give as much arguments as possible supporting their wish to organize the demonstration in a planned place.

Group 2, the group of “Dog-lovers”: they want to express their love for dogs and propose laws to empower dog owners. They informed the municipality about the demonstration they plan at noon at the front of the town hall. But the group was refused by the municipality as they can frighten the tourists. They were proposed to gather at the suburbs in the park 10 km west from the center of the town. The task for the group is to write a complaint to the municipality and give as much arguments as it is possible to support their wish to organize the demonstration in the planned place.

Group 3, the Municipality is informed that there are two groups of people: “Cat-lovers” and “Dog-lovers” who want to organize demonstrations to promote their pets and demand empowerment of law for them. The “Cat-lovers” were first, however the application of “Dog-lovers” was sent only two minutes later. Moreover, no matter: cat- or dog-lovers can frighten the tourists who are massive visiting the center of the town. Try to solve the situation and propose something for both sides with as much arguments as you can.                                                                                            15’

Reflection and discussion:

What are the rules of organizing a public assembly? What are the possible obstacles in organizing assemblies? What are the major difficulties? What conditions must be met to organize a public assembly? Who should be responsible for what?                              10’

  1. Ask students to write on a piece of paper one word associated with the right to assembly and comment it in order to sum up the lesson.                                           5’
Reflection

Try to ask and find together with your students answers for the questions:

  1. Why people assembly?
  2. What conditions must be met in order to gather people in society?
  3. When it can be forbidden to assembly?
  4.  Why is it important to do make concessions?                                                             10’
Notes

Presentation HR19_RTA: Explanation for the slides (as a teaching methodology):

Slide 5:
It is very important that the assembly is certainly legal and protected (implicitly: by state and law) if it is peaceful.

Slide 6:
Even if someone is not peaceful during the meeting, it is sufficient to assume that it is peaceful. No assembly may be prohibited solely on the assumption that it may become aggressive.

Slide 7:
It is a right for everyone. Even a counter demonstration can be organized if it is peaceful.

Slide 8:

The state has the right to be informed about the assembly but has no right to approve it.

Slide 9:
However, there may be restrictions laid down by law, but they must pass the hard test of necessity and be justified by the interests of national or public security, or the protection of public health, morality or the rights of others.

Digital Resource

Presentation HR19_RTA


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

73

otherness
20 othernessHuman rights / My right to play - Traditional games
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva | Ana Torres | Maurício
Duration 90 minutes
Energizers otherness     17 - Toaster or Rock Star

The group starts in a circle with one person in the center. The person in the center points at someone in the circle and says “Toaster” or “Rock star”.

  • If the person in the center says “toaster”, the person being pointed at needs to crouch down and jump up and say “butter me I’m done.” The people on either side should arms up and out strait creating a “toaster” around the person being pointed at.
  • If the person in the center says “Rock star”, the person being pointed at needs to hold his/her hands in front of their mouth as if he/she were singing into a microphone. The people on each side turn away from the person who’s been pointed at and pretend to play the guitar.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     15 - Moving like a toy

The teacher uses a magic word to change the students into many string-loaded (wind-up) toys. At the teacher’s signal, the toys start to move across the class, as many robots, to get their sits. They have to move more quickly at the beginning and then gradually more and more slowly, because their charge is finishing. Some of them will be frozen in the middle of the room, and the teacher has to give their cranks one more turn to help them reach their seats

Objectives

Reflect on the cultural traditions and effects of globalization;

Know more about traditional games;

Try several traditional games.

Preparation

Preparation:

The Facilitator can use sites likehttps://www.tradgames.org.uk/

Suggested reading:

The Convention on the Rights of the Child adopted in 1989 and then signed by 20 countries and subsequently signed by many other countries:

https://www.ohchr.org/en/professionalinterest/pages/crc.aspx

In addition to this international convention, it is important for each country to analyze its own legislation on the right to leisure, not only for children and young people but for people of all ages.

Tips: The activity will greatly benefit from the organization of an interdisciplinary articulation with teachers in the areas of Physical Education and History.

It is possible to create all the tools to play the proposed games with recyclable materials. In this case, it is convenient to articulate with a teacher of education and visual arts.

To be able to perform the game experimentation activity in the proposed time, it is necessary that the tools for the games are already available and organized by stations from the beginning.

After implementing this activity, if you want to give some continuity to the games, the participants can be invited to perform other challenges, such as: i) Search for other traditional games and websites on this subject; ii) Interview older family members by asking them to describe the games they played when they were children and young people; iii) Build tools for traditional games with recyclable materials, etc.; iv) Play the games and make a similar movie to the digital resource shown, etc.

Materials: indispensable tools to play the games and materials to delimit the perimeter in which the games will be held.

Digital tool:  movie showing 4 traditional games, the tools of the games and how they work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OFmi0ZYafM&feature=youtu.be

PowerPoint with the description of the materials and rules of the 4 games. 

Introduction

Children and youngsters have little time to play, given the demands of school schedules and tasks, and all kinds of after-school activities. However, the importance of play in their social, emotional and cognitive development is undeniable.

Playing can be fun and enjoyable in many ways, but they are also a privileged means of knowing and reflecting on different cultural forms, exploring the world and better getting to know oneself.

Traditional games represent and are associated with local cultures. However, there are universal playful patterns, the same traditional games being found in various regions, countries and corners of the world, although there may be differences in designations, rules and ways of playing.

Methodology

The facilitator organizes groups of 3 or 5 elements and delivers each sheet of white A4 paper with 2 columns, asking each group to brainstorm (5 minutes) on the nature of play and of leisure activities, and write what it means to "play" in the left column and what "leisure" means in the right column. From group feedback, write a definition of play and a definition of leisure. (5 minutes).

Then the facilitator asks whether participants know the right to play and introduces Article 31 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child, adopted and opened for signature, ratification and accession by General Assembly resolution 44/25 of 20 November 1989, entry into force 2 September 1990, in accordance with article 49:

"1. States Parties recognize the right of the child to rest and leisure, to engage in play and recreational activities appropriate to the age of the child and to participate freely in cultural life and the arts. 

2. States Parties shall respect and promote the right of the child to participate fully in cultural and artistic life and shall encourage the provision of appropriate and equal opportunities for cultural, artistic, recreational and leisure activity."(3 minutes)

Then the facilitator asks if the participants know traditional games and registers on the board (or large paper sheet) the names of the games that they refer to. Ask if everyone knows these games and if they are all traditional games and what “cultural tradition” means. Then it is important to explain the meaning of knowledge and practices handed down from generation to generation. (10 minutes) 

Then the facilitator projects the movie showing the 4 games, the tools of the games and how they work (see above digital resource). The facilitator explains that they will try to play the games and should pay close attention to the movie. (5 minutes).

The facilitator gives each group a tool for one of the 4 proposed games (Cup Game, Pineapple Game, Wooden Spoon Game, Donkey Game), as well as a small paper with a description of how the game works and explains that they should try to play the game as they saw it in the movie. If they have any questions or difficulties, they must ask for help. (5 minutes).

Then the facilitator asks 1 person from each small group to explain to the whole group how to play the game while the members of his/her small group exemplify (5 minutes).

Then each group will go, in turn, to the space dedicated to each game and experiment playing it. (about 45 minutes).

Reflection

10 minutes:

The Facilitator asks the group some questions like: “Did you know all the games?”, “Did you have fun?”. Then asks each one to write a sentence (on a small paper) about one reason why it is so important to have the right to play and asks that the small papers are put in a small basket (or other object) that later can be put in a public place so that people in the school or local community can see what they think about this right after the activity.

Notes

If you want to continue this activity, the participants can perform other challenges, such as:

Search for other traditional games and websites on this subject;

Interview older family members by asking them to describe the games they played when they were children and young people.

Build tools for traditional games with recyclable materials, etc.

Play the games and make a similar movie to the digital resource shown, etc.

Digital Resource

Digital tool:  movie showing 4 traditional games, the tools of the games and how they work.

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=7OFmi0ZYafM&feature=youtu.be

PowerPoint with the description of the materials and rules of the 4 games:

http://me-you-us.eu/atividades/digital/611/611_My Right to Play.pptx


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

74

otherness
21 othernessHuman rights / Copyright
Developed by AENAO
Duration 80 min
Energizers otherness     20 - Chief of clan

Everyone stands in a circle. One participant closes his/her eyes or steps out of the room. He/She will have to guess who is the chief of the clan. One participant volunteers to be the secret Chief (quietly, so the "guesser" can't hear anything). The chief begins an action such as snapping fingers, patting the tummy, or slapping knees, and everyone in the circle imitates him/her.  The guesser returns to the room and tries to figure out who the chief is. As the guesser looks around, the chief changes the action avoiding being detected.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     15 - Moving like a toy

The teacher uses a magic word to change the students into many string-loaded (wind-up) toys. At the teacher’s signal, the toys start to move across the class, as many robots, to get their sits. They have to move more quickly at the beginning and then gradually more and more slowly, because their charge is finishing. Some of them will be frozen in the middle of the room, and the teacher has to give their cranks one more turn to help them reach their seats

Objectives
  • To become familiar with the term "copyright".
  • To realize that there is a connection between "copyright and freedom" of expression as a human right.
  • To gain awareness on copyrighting material.
Preparation
  • Suggested reading

https://www.internationalpublishers.org/images/Copyright.pdf

https://www.copyrightservice.co.uk/protect/

https://www.humanrights.com/what-are-human-rights/videos/copyright.htm

For website design:

www.wix.com or https://sites.google.com or www.wordpress.com

For online publications:

www.issuu.com

  • Materials: computers, internet connection
Introduction

According to article #27 of The Universal Declaration of Human Rights:

  1. Everyone has the right freely to participate in the cultural life of the community, to enjoy the arts and to share in scientific advancement and its benefits.
  2. Everyone has the right to the protection of the moral and material interests resulting from any scientific, literary or artistic production of which he is the author.

Copyright protection is not considered as a human right, but it is a tool which protects the human rights of authors and publishers. Copyright impacts on freedom of expression, both of the author and of members of the public who wish to distribute the author's works as part of their own freedom of expression.

Methodology

NFE tool digital creation of a website or digital publication (an intellectual output in general), team work

  1. Teacher first asks students if they know what copyright is. Then he/she explains to them what is copyright and the relation of that to human rights and freedom of expression.(10’)
  2. Teacher shows video about Copyright https://www.humanrights.com/what-are-human-rights/videos/copyright.html             (5’)
  3. Teacher introduces software which will enable students to create their own website (choosing one of the following web platforms: www.wix.com or https://sites.google.com or www.wordpress.com.   The teacher can also show to the students the instructions on how to create a website (HR21.pptx - to be downloaded through the PDF icon).   (10’)
  4. Students are then divided in groups of 4-5. They are required to create a simple website of their preferred theme (their school’s webpage is the proposed idea) and then understand how to protect their copyrights, according to the above suggested manual (https://www.copyrightservice.co.uk/protect/)  (30’)
  5. Groups present their work to the plenary and explain how they will obtain copyright protection.(15’)
Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary:

  • Was it difficult to create the game?
  • Is it important to protect your own work? Why? (10')
Notes
Digital Resource

http://me-you-us.eu/atividades/digital/619/619_Copyright.mp4


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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22 othernessHuman rights / Duties and Limitations
Developed by Prosveta
Duration 60
Energizers otherness     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives

Students will:

  • Learn about their responsibilities and duties to other people (human right 29);
  • Learn about the limitations to their human rights resulting from the human rights of other people’
  • Improve their analytical skills;
  •  Improve their presentation skills.
Preparation
  1. Preparation:
  • Print the Flashcards and Pack of cards with the human rights (to be uses in activities 1 and 4)
  • Ask students to write (and illustrate) all human rights on a poster and put it on the wall
  • Equipment: Computer/ laptop and beamer.

        2. Digital tool: Flashcards, interactive presentation, case study, pack of cards.

Introduction

“One of the ultimate goals of human rights education is the creation of a genuine human rights culture... Students must learn to evaluate real-life experience in human rights terms, starting with their own behaviour and the immediate community in which they live. They need to make an honest assessment about how the reality they experience every day conforms to human rights principles and then to take active responsibility for improving their community.”

ABC: Teaching Human Rights, Practical Activities for Primary and Secondary Schools UN, Geneva, p96, 2004.

Methodology
  1. Getting back into the topic of Human rights. Split up the students into 2 teams and place all the flashcards in a hat or a basket. During each round, a representative from one team steps up, pulls out a flashcard, and attempts to get his or her team to guess the human right written on the flashcard by giving silent cues (miming and body language). Teams might refer to the poster with the 30 human rights (if available).The first team that gets to 5 points wins.

NFE tool: brainstorming, play charades                                                                      10’

  1. Students get into the topic of article 29 of the UDHR about Our responsibilities to the community, our duties and the limitations of our human rights: interactive presentation (Digital tool: HR22_1  or watch the narrated video)                                                13’
  2. Limitations to our human rights – watch the interactive video and discuss the suggested issues (Digital tool: HR22_2; HR22_2 narrated NFE tools: case study, discussion, generating ideas – blue skies thinking.                                            15’
  3. Students are split in teams of equal number of people (between 8 to 12 students). Each team receives 2 packs of 30 cards. Pack1 comprises 30 cards with the 30 human rights. Pack2 comprises 30 cards with explanations of the human rights. Task: team members have to match the 30 cards from Pack1 with the 30 cards from Pack2.

            The team who matches all the 60 cards correctly is the winner.                            15’

Reflection

Guided reflection – suggested activities and questions:                                                    10’

  1. How did you feel during the training? Students go to one of the spaces marked with the feeling which represents best their overall emotion regarding the training activity as a whole: 1. Interested ; 2. Content; 3. Confused; 4. Surprised; 5. Excited; 6. Happy; 7. Embarrassed; 8. Nervous. When students split in the groups, they share in their group why they have chosen this feeling. After that a representative of the group reports to the other groups the why the students from his group have chosen the corresponding feeling.  (Flashcards with emotions)
  2. Which training activity did you like most? (1, 2, 3 or 4) MENTIMETER voting https://www.menti.com/gb73cxur6y
  3. What new things did you learn? (related to human rights or not)
  4.  How can you make use of what you have learned in the training?

Notes

Suggestions for organizing the training activities in case of distance learning:

Activity 1: Divide the students in 2 teams and have each team choose a representative who will explain the human right. You use the ZOOM Breakout rooms option and create a room only for you, as a teacher, and the representative of Team 1(T1). The rest of the students are assigned to Room 2. You and the representative of T1 enter Room 1, and the T1 representative gets the link https://wordwall.net/resource/4774756  - this is a random wheel with the human rights. He/ she spins the wheel and when it stops - this is the HR that has to be explained to his team. Then, you close the Breakout rooms and the representative of T1 starts explaining the human right form the random wheel by giving silent cues (miming and body language). His team mates might refer to randome wheel as well, so that they know the list of the human rights they can choose from (you share the Random Wheel link in the common room after closing the Breakout rooms). Team 1 members can make 3 guesses. In case the 3 guesses are wrong, it is the turn of Team 2 to guess the human right of T1 representative. After that it is the turn of Team 2 following the same procedure. The first team that gets 5 points wins.

This is a tutorial how to activate and use the ZOOM Breakout rooms feature.

2. Activity 4 game could be played individually by students - link to the game.

Digital Resource

Flashcards (activity 1)

Human Rights random wheel (activity 1)

Interactive presentation (activity 2)

Narrated video (activity 2)

Case study: Limitations to our human rights (activity 3)

Case study (narrated) - activity 3

Pack of cards (activity 4)

Game - Human Rights Match Up (activity 4 - in case of distant learning)

Flashcards with emotions (reflection) 

Tutorial - how to activate and make use of the ZOOM Breakout rooms feature


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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Diversity

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1 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / What’s diversity? (All different all equal)
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     10 - Rope game

Have the participants stand on the middle of a space cleared of desks, chairs, etc. Divide the room in a way that allows them easily to move from one half of the room to the other, e.g. by placing a long piece of rope on the floor. The teacher stands at one of the ends of the rope and calls out a characteristic, or a colour or a letter, e.g.  “Everyone having blue eyes!”; “Everyone having 3 brothers”, “Everyone whose name begins with B”, etc. and points to the part of the room where the participants wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names have to move to. All participants who are wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names move to the respective part of the room; the ones who are not , have to go to the other part. Questions have to be constructed so that the class does not divide in groups having comparatively equal number of students, i.e. one of the groups should consist (in most cases) of one, two or few students. Debriefing: Participants are asked to share how they felt when they were part of a big group; and when they were standing alone (or were part of a very small group); what did they feel of themselves (as part of a small/ big group), and what their feelings were towards the group they were not part of.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Objectives
  • Spot the differences between people in our close medium (friends and family);
  • Come to the conclusion that we are all different but equally important in the jigsaw of life;
  • Get a deeper understanding of the advantages and disadvantages of living in a homogeneous community;
  • Come to the perception that diversity is strength.

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Preparation
  1. Preparation:
  • Laptop computer and a projector – for the introductory activity;
  • Activity 2, part 1*: required materials/ equipment – either one laptop computer for each of the 3 or 4 groups, OR have 3 or 4 packs of picture cards printed;
  • Activity 3, group B – one laptop computer to watch the brain teaser.
  1. Digital tool: D1_1 inspired from (Cross - Cultural Communication: Many Faces of Diversity); D1_2; D1_3
  2. Tips:

In Getting into the topic activity (D1_1) students are encouraged to talk about their personal encounters with the previously presented aspects of diversity in their local context. Different aspect of diversity are suggested by the different photo collages:

- 3:48’- ethnic diversity/ racial diversity

- 4:16’- racial diversity

- 4:46 – ethnic diversity/ nationality/ social status

However the teacher could accept other answers; the point is to have students present their opinion and start a discussion.

*Request to the teacher (activity 2)

Please collect and scan (or directly send the hard copies) of the picture cards/ sheets with students’ first impressions. They could be used in the upgraded version of the Teacher’s Manual (after Pilot 1) so that students will have information about the differences and similarities in the reactions to the same visual material at international level.

Introduction

We are all different, even within our own cultures. Quite often, we reject and are suspicious of people who are different. We feel safer when communicating with people who physically and mentally look like us.

But this is the easy way. We are missing a lot – life would be much more colourful and interesting if we embrace diversity and value it as an asset.

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Methodology

Getting into the topic - presentation: Diversity – introduction to various aspects of differences between people (D1_1)    5‘                                                                 

  1. “What is a multicultural society?” – discussion ; practical aspects considering the national context                                                       10’
  2. All different – all equal. NFE tool Individual and Team work:         30’

 Students are split in groups of 8 to 10 people. Each group receives a pack of 8 to 10 pictures as a hard copy (option A) or a laptop computer with the pictures (option B) – D1_2. Each group member gets one of the pictures (option A).                                  

Part 1: Students are asked to look at the picture they have received and put down their first impressions at the bottom of the page. The first person writes in box 1, folds the paper backward and passes the picture card to their neighbor on the right who writes their impressions in box 2, folds the paper and passes it to their right neighbor, etc. When all students in the group have seen the all pictures and have written their impressions, part 1 is over.                                                                            10’

Part 2: Each student keeps the last sheet of paper he/she has worked with, unfolds the bottom part of the paper card and reads all the 8-10 impressions to the whole group.                                                                  5’     

Reflection 1                                                                                                   10’

    Debriefing within the group: if possible, provide some support teachers to moderate this activity (one teacher per group: if this is not possible, the reflection could be done as a whole class activity. Questions to be discussed:

  1. You looked at the same pictures. Did your first impressions differ or were they similar?
  2. Are you surprised that other people reacted in a different way to the same picture?
  3. Real-life experiences: Have you witnessed a case/ seen something with (a) friend/s but have gotten a different impression of it?
  4. Do you remember getting first impressions of someone which later proved to be completely wrong?
  5. What did this activity teach you – about judging people, about different ways of perception, about diversity of opinions within small groups of people?                                                                                                                 

Part 3: comparing first impressions of the different groups – representatives of the groups come to the front and share the outcomes of the debriefing activity (supported by examples)                               5’

Option B: students can look at the pictures on a computer screen, provided that there is a laptop/ computer for each group. They write their first impressions from the pictures on strips of coloured paper (different colour for each picture). Impressions are collected considering colour and glued together.

  1. Diversity – strength or weakness: drama activity                             25’

Students are split in 2 groups (A and B).                    

Group A: imagine you are living in a homogeneous (monoculture society/ community) and you like it. Think of creative ways to promote the idea that being a member of a monoculture community is an advantage (outlining its strong sides or disadvantages of the opposite); you have 5‘ to discuss and agree on the plot, 10’ for rehearsal and 5’- to present your work to the other group.

Group B: Imagine you are living in a multicultural society/ community) and you like it (watch the video to get into the topic D1_3). Think of how to promote the idea that being a member of a multicultural community is a great advantage (outlining its strong sides or disadvantages of the opposite); you have 5 ‘ to discuss and agree on the plot, 10’ for rehearsal and 5’- to present your work and convince group A you are right.

Reflection 2                                                                                                     5’

Imagine you could live in a dream community. What would it look like?                                                              

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Reflection

Reflections 1 & 2 are part of the main body of the activities as they are closely related to them.

As a close up, student could be encouraged to share the most valuable aspects of the activity; the most interesting ones; most surprising part of the activity, etc.

Notes
Digital Resource

D1_1 inspired from (Cross - Cultural Communication: Many Faces of Diversity) - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/17/D1_1.mp4

D1_2 - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/17_D1_2.pdf

D1_3 - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/17/Diversity1_3.mp4


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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2 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Prejudges and stereotypes
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 75
Energizers otherness     22 - Names and adjectives

Participants stand in a circle; they think of an adjective to describe character or how they are feeling. The adjective must start with the same letter as their name, for instance, “I’m Maria and I’m merry”. Or, “I’m Alexander and I’m amazing.” As they say this, they can also mime an action that presents the adjective in a meaningful way. (N.B. In the national language versions of the TM there should be used popular names for the country and relevant adjectives in the respective language).

Variation (use if time allows): The game could also be used a memory game (concentration game) to check if the rest of the group has remembered the ‘name-adjective’ pairs. After several rounds (each participant repeating his name and adjective, the teacher/ a game master, checks if the group remembers the ‘names-adjectives’ fixed pairs by saying the name of one of the students, e.g. ‘Maria’; Maria steps forward to the middle of the circle and the rest of the group are expected to come up with the adjective previously linked to the name by saying “Maria is merry”. If they cannot guess, the participant in the circle (Maria) might mime again the adjective as a tip.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     9 - Lion's breath

Lion’s breath is a playful way to release and relax into more peaceful feelings. The trainer tells students that they are going to do a breath called the lion’s breath in order to let go of feelings or thoughts we no longer want. This breath is very helpful in getting those ideas out of us and pushing them far away.

Instructions

  • Imagine that you are a mighty lion. You have a giant roar!
  • Sit on your heels and sit up tall like a mighty, proud, lion. Get ready to let your roar go!
  • Think of a feeling or a thought that you would like to let go. Squeeze your hands into fists, holding tight and thinking of that feeling or thought.
  • Take a deep breath in and let your roar out, stick out your tongue at the same, stretch your arms out wide in front of you and open your hands wide, roaring out the feeling or thought and letting it go.
    • Repeat.
Objectives
  • Recognition of stereotypes;
  • Fighting with prejudices:
  • Finding different solutions according problem recognition;
  • Learn to look both sides of a situation;
  • Learn to compromise – do I need to change? Or the other are to change?

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Preparation
  1. Guided drama – this is an activity in which students are presented a case as far as general settings and characters are concerned. They are guided through the framework of the plot by receiving descriptions of planned events (meetings) and of their tasks in the respected meetings (messages). They are to step in the shoes of the characters and, keeping to the provided information, are free to decide on the story, i.e. details of the plot, characters’ speech, etc. The printed information is distributed to the students immediately before the events; students read it and plan their actions and speech right away, similarly to ‘speed dating’ techniques.
  2. Reflection through the method of the ‘Six thinking hats’ of Eduard de Bono – D2_6
  3. Preparation: print D2_2, D2_3 and D2_4; required equipment – laptop computer, multimedia projector and screen.
  4. Digital tool: D2_1 (video lesson), D2_2 (participants); D2_3 (meetings), D2_4 (messages), D2_5 – video, D2_6 – interactive video for the reflection.
Introduction

“Stereotypes lose their power when the world is found to be more complex than the stereotype would suggest. When we learn that individuals do not fit the group stereotype, then it begins to fall apart. “

                                                                                                             Ed Koch

Methodology

Getting into the topic – interactive video: Stereotypes and prejudices – definitions and examples (D2_1).                                                                 5’

The New Students – guided drama activity inspired by the “HOWGH! A Simulation for Youth and Adult Education on Stereotypes and Discriminations” (Millenium Training and Development Institute).

  1. Introduction in the activity and distribution of parts – 9 participants: 5 members of a refugee family; 4 – locals (D2_2)                                   5
  2. Food for thought - watching the video as a preparation for the ‘New Students’ activity (D2_5)                                                                          5’
  3. Meeting 1: R1, R2, R3, R4 and R5 receive D2_3 (meeting 1) and act it out.                                                                                                             5
  4. Meeting 2: R1, R4, L1, L2, L3, L4 receive D2_3 (meeting 2) and act it out.                                                                                                              5
  5. L2 gets D2_4 (message 1), R1 gets D2_4 (message 2)                          2
  6. Meeting 3: R1 and L2 receive D2_3 (meeting 3) and act it out.         5
  7. Meeting 4:  R1, R4, L1, L2, L3 and L4 receive D2_3 (meeting 4) and act it out.                                                                                                    3
  8. L1 receives D2_4 (message 3).
  9. Meeting 5: R1, R4, L1, L2, L3, L4 receive D2_3 (meeting 5) and act it out.                                                                                                            10
  10. Meeting 6: R1, R4, L1, L2, L3, L4 receive D2_3 (meeting 6) and act it out.                                                                                                              5
  11. Meeting 7: R1, R4, L1, L2, L3, L4 receive D2_3 (meeting 7) and act it out.                                                                                                              5
  12. Meeting 8: R1, R4, L1, L2, L3, L4 receive D2_3 (meeting 8) and act it out.                                                                                                              5
  13. Meeting 9: R1, R4, L1, L2, L3, L4 receive D2_3 (meeting 9) and act it out considering lessons learnt.                                                                 5

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Reflection

Six thinking hats (Eduard de Bono)D2_6 – NFE tool: guided discussion: Thinking about past and future events and decisions can be very frustrating. Life is a complex thing and everything might seem to be mixed up and complicated. It is usually a good idea to distinguish between the different aspects of an event or a decision in order to see the real picture. Here is how we can do it. Imagine that when you put on a hat of specific colour, you consider only one aspect of a case or a decision.                                                                                                      10’  

  1. The WHITE hat is the hat of facts. So, put on your white hats and think (and share) what facts you learned in today’s activity.
  2. The RED hat is the hat of emotions. So, put on your red hat and think (and share) how you were feeling during the activity or during a specific part of the activity.
  3. The BLUE hat is the learning hat. So, put on your blue hat and think (and share) what you learned in today’s activity.
  4. The BLACK hat is the negative hat. Put it on and think (and share) what you didn’t like in today’s activity.
  5. The GREEN hat is positive hat. Put it on and think (and share) what you liked in today’s activity.

 The YELLOW hat is the hat of creativity. Put it on and think (and share) how you could use what you experienced today in real.

Notes
Digital Resource

D2_1 (video lesson): http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/18/D2_1.mp4

D2_2 (participants), D2_3 (meetings), D2_4 (messages): http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/18_D2_2-D2_3-D2_4.pdf

D2_5 – video; http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/18/D2_5.mp4

D2_6 – interactive video for the reflection: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/18/D2_6.ppsx


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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3 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Identity and diversity (ME-Others)
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     10 - Mountain range

Stand side by side in a line, in mountain pose, your feet hip-width apart.  Each foot must touch the foot of the person on each side. Walk (as a group) across the room without separating their feet from your partner’s.
If the group comes apart, you must begin again.

Variation: Ask the students to walk on their toes.

Objectives

Students will learn:

  • that identities comprise a complex set of characteristics; some of them are inborn but some might develop over time;
  • how to create a visual presentation of their class identity;
  • that all people are unique and have the freedom to be themselves; the outcome is a world that is diverse and a rather interesting place to live;
  • to respect differences and diversity.
Preparation
  1. Preparation:
  • Laptop computer and beamer for activities 1 and 3
  • Print worksheets D3_2
  • Computers and internet connection for activity 2.5
  1.  Suggested reading: instructions how to create a word cloud D3_4

Digital tool: D3_1; D3_2; D3_3; D3_4

Introduction

Identity is who you are, your unique characteristics.

“Diversity is the magic. It is the first manifestation, the first beginning of the differentiation of a thing and of a simple identity. The greater the diversity, the greater the perfection.”                  Thomas Berry

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Methodology

  1. Describe the people in the photos – babies and adults (D3_1): NFE tool: Brainstorming, Discussion as suggested in D3_1.         10’
  2. Characteristics of identity                                                          35’
    • List different characteristics of identity e.g. ethnic origin, skin colour, hair colour, age, favourite TV shows, past-time activities, school subjects, etc. NFE tool: Pairwork – 5’
    •  Characteristic of identity as chain class activity (NFE tool: Brainstorming game): pair 1 comes up with one characteristic of identity; pair 2 – with another one, etc. (no repetition permitted)– 5’
    • Describe your identity on the provided worksheet D3_2 (anonymously). NFE tool – Individual work & Game; the teacher/ moderator collects all worksheets and the class plays the “Guess who …” game: moderator picks up one of the completed worksheets and reads the information; the class tries to guess whose identity is being described – 10’
    • Me and others – different or the same – NFE tool - Pairwork:  students are paired randomly with the task to identify characteristics they have in common and ones which are different for the pair (duration 5’), e.g. liking different TV shows but having the same eye colour; indirect conclusion – we all have unique identities but still have things in common – 5’
    • Class identity – NFE tool: Group activity; Developing digital competences: (1) students are split in groups (the number of groups corresponds to the number of the available computers in class); (2) each group receives its quota of the completed D3_2 worksheets and has to type the answers in a text file (all information from the worksheets is typed even though some answers would be possibly repeated many times);(3) the moderator collects all text documents and combines them in a common file; (4) the combined text from the common file is pasted in  http://www.wordclouds.com/ (instructions in D3_4); (5) the word cloud of the class identity is ready; it could be saved, printed, etc. -                          (10’)       
  3.  ​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​​Value diversity, respect differences. NFE tool – Discussion. Food for thought: watch the interactive video and discuss the suggested issues (D3_3)                                                                                     15
Reflection

Guided reflection:                                                                                       10’

  • What did you learn about your identity compared to your classmates’ identities?
  • Do you think some identity characteristics are more important than others? Why?
  • Do you want to be who you are and have others respect your identity? Would you change something in yourself if you could?
  • Do you think everybody has the right to have their identity characteristics respected? Why? Exceptions?
Notes
Digital Resource

D3_1 -  http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/19/D3_1_Identity.pptx

D3_2 - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/19_D3_2-D3_4.pdf

D3_3 -  http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/19/D3_3.mp4

D3_4 - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/19_D3_2-D3_4.pdf


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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4 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Social Inclusion/Exclusion
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     7 - Connecting eyes

Participants stand in a circle. Each person makes eye contact with another person across the circle. The two walk across the circle and exchange positions, while maintaining eye contact. Many pairs can exchange at the same time, and the group should try to make sure that everyone in the circle is included in the exchange. Tip: Begin by trying this in silence and then exchange greetings in the middle of the circle.

Variations: If the teacher considers, knowing the class atmosphere, that some students might be left not participating, i.e. they try to make eye contact but nobody responds to them and they have no chance to move from their initial position, the moderator could divide the class in 2 groups and introduce a competitive element – after the activity each group will be marked on the ‘team spirit thermometer’ (which could be printed on a A4 paper and the teacher marks the degrees with a marker). The more people you have left not participating in the ‘eye contact’ activity – the lower the degrees to be marked on the thermometer.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     9 - Lion's breath

Lion’s breath is a playful way to release and relax into more peaceful feelings. The trainer tells students that they are going to do a breath called the lion’s breath in order to let go of feelings or thoughts we no longer want. This breath is very helpful in getting those ideas out of us and pushing them far away.

Instructions

  • Imagine that you are a mighty lion. You have a giant roar!
  • Sit on your heels and sit up tall like a mighty, proud, lion. Get ready to let your roar go!
  • Think of a feeling or a thought that you would like to let go. Squeeze your hands into fists, holding tight and thinking of that feeling or thought.
  • Take a deep breath in and let your roar out, stick out your tongue at the same, stretch your arms out wide in front of you and open your hands wide, roaring out the feeling or thought and letting it go.
    • Repeat.
Objectives
  • Learn how to recognize various manifestations of social exclusion behavior;
  • Create a culture of zero tolerance to social exclusion as a form bullying in school environment;
  • Learn about one’s personal responsibility in fighting social exclusion – Am I to get involved? What could I do?
Preparation
  1. Suggested reading – playback theatre (Playback Theatre); theater of the oppressed; forum theater
  2. Reflection through the method of the ‘Six thinking hats’of Eduard de Bono’ – D2_6
  3. Required equipment – laptop computer, multimedia projector and screen
  4. Digital tool: D4_1 (video as a brain teaser), D4_2  - interactive game.
  • When trying to open D4_2.swf file, there appears a message warning that the file might harm your computer. The reason for this message is that the settings of the most common browsers have been set not to open SWF files by default because they are not quite common. This is why users are asked to agree to open swf files, which you have to do by choosing the option KEEP. The file will cause no harm to you computer.

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Introduction

“We can either emphasize those aspects of our traditions, religious or secular, that speak of hatred, exclusion, and suspicion or work with those that stress the interdependence and equality of all human beings. The choice is yours.”                                  Karen Armstrong

Methodology
  1. Getting into the topic –video: Social exclusion - inclusion (D4_15’
  2. Personal involvement/experiencing acts of social exclusion. NFE tool: Playback theatre activity                                                       55
  1. Introduction in the activity – the basics of playback theatre/ theatre of the oppressed - 5’
  2. Social exclusion – interactive computer game (Stepping in the shoes of bullies and students who are being bullied – students play the game as a preparation for activity B.3 (D4_2) - 10
  3. Students are split in groups of 6. One of the groups (type A) has the task of act a short sketch which presents the life in community which is doing well regarding social inclusion of all its members. The rest of the groups (type B) are to perform sketches presenting social exclusion examples of community life. Each member of type B groups is assigned the part of either being subjected to social exclusion, or the part of an active or passive contributor the social exclusion act: introduction in the activity – 5’
  4. Procedure: A and B groups - to be run simultaneously– 10’
  • Preparation – 5’
  • Rehearsing – 5’
  1. Performing: 25'
    1. Group A – 5’
    2. Group B, performance1: The audience watches the sketch but has no right to comment or interfere – 5’
    3. Group B, performance2: The sketch is being performed again but this time the audience can participate by changing the plot. Whenever the spectators are not happy with what is happening on the stage as someone is being mistreated (discriminated/ ignored/ excluded from the life of the community), they have the right to stop the performance by clapping their hands,  substitute one of the actors and change the plot in a way they consider appropriate – 15’    

                                                    

Reflection

Six thinking hats (Eduard de Bono) – guided discussion: Thinking about past and future events and decisions can be very frustrating. Life is a complex thing and everything might seem to be mixed up and complicated. It is usually a good idea to distinguish between the different aspects of an event or a decision in order to see the real picture. Here is how we can do it. Imagine that when you put on a hat of specific colour, you consider only one aspect of a case or a decision.

                                                                                                                 10’  

  1. The WHITE hat is the hat of facts. So, put on your white hats and think (and share) what facts you learned in today’s activity.
  2. The RED hat is the hat of emotions. So, put on your red hat and think (and share) how you were feeling during the activity or during a specific part of the activity.
  3. The BLUE hat is the learning hat. So, put on your blue hat and think (and share)  what you learned in today’s activity.
  4. The BLACK hat is the negative hat. Put it on and think (and share) what you didn’t like in today’s activity.
  5. The GREEN hat is positive hat. Put it on and think (and share) what you liked in today’s activity. 
  6. The YELLOW hat is the hat of creativity. Put it on and think (and share) how you could use what you experienced today in real life.

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Notes
Digital Resource

D4_1 (video as a brain teaser) - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/20/D4_1.avi

D4_2  - interactive game - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/20/D4_2_Can_I_Join_You.swf

When trying to open D4_2.swf file, there appears a message warning that the file might harm your computer. The reason for this message is that the settings of the most common browsers have been set not to open SWF files by default because they are not quite common. This is why users are asked to agree to open swf files, which you have to do by choosing the option KEEP. The file will cause no harm to you computer.


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5 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Racism: Stop and Play! (How to combat Racism)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 90 min
Energizers otherness     1 - Break the Circle

The teacher assigns randomly a number to each student, depending on the group size, i.e. for 20 students, numbers 1-4 are ok, so each group has 5 people (groups could be synthesized by the students with the same number, i.e. all having been assigned number ‘1’ or by students where each one has his/her own unique number 1-4; similarly and more fun is grouping by ingredient for a Greek salad, where every student is i.e. ‘tomato’, ‘cucumber’, ‘onion’, ‘oregano’, etc.) Once the groups have been formed, they make  circles and the teacher randomly picks a number (or an ingredient) to step out of the circle and try to break in, while the others remaining are instructed to not let go of their hands no matter what. This can be repeated once more with another number stepping out.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     17 - Circle massage

The group forms a circle and faces one direction. Each participant places his/her hands on the shoulders of the person in front of her/him. Each person then gives the person who is in front a shoulder massage. The person being massaged can give a feedback. After a few minutes, the group turns the other way so that the person who has been making the massage is then receiving it in return.

Objectives
  • to understand what racism is;
  • to reflect about concrete actions to combat it.
Preparation
  • Materials

Computer and projector (optional)

  • Suggested Reading

 Augusto’s Boal FORUM THEATRE for teachers, pp. 2-4 (Susie MacDonald - Daniel Rachel)

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Introduction

This activity is based on the methodology of “Forum Theatre”, a technique pioneered by Brazilian radical Augusto Boal. A play or scene, usually indicating some kind of oppression, is shown twice. During the replay, any member of the audience (‘spect-actor’) is allowed to shout ‘Stop!’, step forward and take the place of one of the oppressed characters, showing how they could change the situation to enable a different outcome. Several alternatives may be explored by different spect-actors. The other actors remain in character, improvising their responses. A facilitator (Joker) is necessary to enable communication between the players and the audience.

The strategy breaks through the barrier between performers and audience, putting them on an equal footing. It enables participants to try out courses of action which could be applicable to their everyday lives. Originally the technique was developed by Boal as a political tool for change (part of the Theatre of the Oppressed), but has been widely adapted for use in educational contexts.

Methodology

NFE Tool Forum Theatre

  1. The teacher will introduce the topic of Racism, asking some questions such as:
  • Do you know what it is Racism?
  • Which groups of people are or have been affected by episode of Racism?
  • Why do you think people are racist?
  • Have you ever witnessed to a racist episode in your life? (15’)
  1. The teacher will show the Video. (5’)
  2. The students will be divided in two teams: one team will play the role of the actors and the second one will be the spect-actors. The teacher will be the “joker” (see the suggested reading).
  3. Basing on the inputs emerged during the introduction, the actors will agree on a situation to be played, in which a scene of Racism will be presented with different roles of “oppressors” and “oppressed”. (For example: a schoolmate bullied because is wearing the veil, a football player insulted just because is black, a girl on the bus next to which no one want to seat ect)   (15’)
  4. The actors will have some time to rehearse the performance. (15’)
  5. The actors will play the scene the first time. During this first performance the audience will just watch without interrupting the scene. (5’)
  6. The spectators will have some time to analyze the scene and think about possible actions to change the situation. (5’)
  7. The performance will be repeated. This time, everyone from the audience can stand up, say “STOP!” and enter in the scene, taking the place of the protagonist, or of someone else who is playing the role of the “oppressed” (the oppressors would not change the situation), intervening for changing the series of events. In this way the spectators can become spect-actors. The other actors will follow the situation, improvising how they would act in that changed situation. (15’)

DT – Children’s Educational Video: Explaining Racism and Discrimination – That’s Why TV

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Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary, using the questions below (15’):

  • What happened in this activity?
  • How did you feel during the activity?

For the actors:

  • How easy or difficult was it to play your role?
  • How did you feel, imagining yourself as that person? Was it a person like you at all? Do you know anyone like that person?

For the spect-actors:

  • How did you feel during the first performance?
  • How did you feel during the second one?

For all:

  • Do you think you can actively change the events also in your daily life when you assist to a scene of oppression?
  • Do you think is more difficult? Why?

Do you think is important? Why?

Notes

For the Forum Theatre activity we suggest teachers to explain well the activity and to find suitable solutions to the role-play, stimulating their creative thinking in the solution of the problem and providing furthermore suggestions. Maybe it could be useful to provide "examples of interventions" in the activity.

Digital Resource

Children’s Educational Video: Explaining Racism and Discrimination – That’s Why TV

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/21/ChildrenDiscrimination.mp4


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6 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / I am able to do it! (Disability)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 80 min
Energizers otherness     14 - I am going on a trip

Everyone sits in a circle. Start by saying “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug”, and hug the person to your right. That person then has to say “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug and a pat on the back”, and then give the person on their right a hug and a pat on the back. Each person repeats what has been said and adds a new action to the list. Go round the circle until everyone has had a turn.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • Raise awareness about disability and different abilities;
  • Promote a non-discriminatory view about disability
Preparation

Materials

  • A box with different objects inside (ex: an apple, an easer, a glass, a paper clip…)
  • Papers or flipcharts
  • Pens and crayons

Tips

The teacher can choose different objects which can be easily found on the class or at home. To make the game more interesting, some objects should be very hard to guess! As well for the second game, the teacher can choose different statements, the more and more harder

Introduction

Students will experiment different forms of disability through some games, reflecting about the discrimination related to this topic.

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Methodology

NFE Tool: Experiential games

  1. The students will be divided in two teams (or more, depending on the number of students). The teacher will introduce the games.
  2. First game = a paper and a pen will be provided to each team. One member chosen by each team will put for one minute one hand into the box trying to guess as many objects as possible, writing the answers on the paper. After all teams will play, the papers with the names of the objects will be given to the teacher who will check which team will have guessed more objects. (10)
  3. Second game = the teacher will say a statement to the ear of one member of each team and he/she will say them to his/her team without speaking, just moving the lips. The team will have one minute to write down the statement, the leader can repeat it as many time as needed within one minute. The game will be repeated with other 2 statements. The first one should be easy such as “I love my class”; the other ones can be harder to be understood such as “I love to come at school but I would prefer to be at the beach” and if the class is very good on it, the teacher can use also some “tongue-twister”.

At the end of the game, the teacher will check the papers and decide the team guessing more statements or approaching more to them. (10)

  1. The teacher will show the video (5)
  2. Reflection (15)
  3. Students will be asked to draw a new and less discriminatory logo to indicate disable people and to invent a motto to promote their inclusion. (20)

DT – video Inclusion of people with disabilities - ACT Alliance

Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary, showing the video and using the questions below (15):

  • What happened in this activity?
  • Did you realize you experiment two different forms of disability? Which ones?
  • Have you ever think about the difficulty and barriers to be a disable person?
  • How did you feel in not be able to see what was into the box and not can use your voice to speak?
  • Do you find any “opportunity”/positive aspect in this situation?
  • What do you think about the video you saw?
  • What is the first image that come up to your mind when talking about disability?
  • Do you think you will be able to create a more positive logo?
  • Do it!
Notes
Digital Resource

video “Inclusion of people with disabilities” - ACT Alliance

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/22/Inclusionofdisabilities.mp4


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7 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Bullying: What should I do? (Diversity at school)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 90 min
Energizers otherness     11 - Alphabetical order

Students make a circle with the chairs, take off their shoes and get on the chairs (one per person - the circle needs to be as close as possible). Standing on the chairs and just moving from one to another one without getting off, students have to arrange themselves in alphabetical order according to their name. As soon as they are ready, teacher will check if they are right; if not they continue until they are right. 

Relaxing Exercises otherness     12 - Warm back

A piece of paper is stuck to each student’s back and they are given a pen. The paper is already prepared. Each piece of paper says: “I like………..”. Slow music is played and the students walk around and write characteristics about the person whom they like on the paper. Each child is allowed to look at the paper at the end and take it home.

Objectives
  • To reflect on different kinds of bullying
  • To analyze different responses to bullying
  • To identify strategies, people and actions that can support children being bullied
Preparation

Materials

  • A paper
  • A pen
  • A flipchart
  • Crayons (optional)
  • Print and cut out the bullying scenes provided
  • Computer
  • Projector (optional)

TIPS

Write your own bullying scenes that the children in your group can relate to instead of using those that are provided.

Introduction

Bullying is a phenomenon affecting more or less all schools. Often children don’t know how to react and face these situations. Through this activity students will reflect about bullying and decide how to position themselves and how to respond to different bullying scenarios, analyzing pros and cons of different possible reactions and commit themselves to react in a good way, combating bullying in their school.

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Methodology

NFE Tool : Discussion, Game with movement, based on  “Bullying Scenes” from COMPASITO (Nancy Flowers, 2009)

  1. Introduce the topic of bullying asking questions such as these:
  • What is bullying?
  • What are the different ways people bully?
  • Why do you think people bully? (10’)
  1. Ask someone to divide a paper into 4 squares and put a number from 1 to 4 on each square. Put each square in a different corner of the room. (5’)
  2. Explain that they will reflect about different ways people can respond to situations involving bullying. The teacher will read a description of a bullying scene. For each situation three possible responses are given. A fourth response is always open if you think of a different response.
  3. Each corner of the room is numbered. After students hear the situation and the responses, each one will go to the corner that represents what they think they would do in that situation.
  4. Read out the bullying situation and give the students time to choose their response and go to the corresponding corner of the room. Once the children have taken a position, ask a few in each position why they chose that response and some of its advantages and disadvantages. Allow those children who chose the open corner to explain how they would respond. (30’)
  5. The teacher will show the Video. (5’)
  6. Students will be invited to create a “manifesto” against bullying: basing on the positive reaction emerged during the activity and taking inspiration from the video shown, students will write down on a flipchart some rules to combat bullying in their school, answering to the question “what should I do to combat bullying in my school?” (25’)

DT - video Ways to Stop Bullying” 

Bullying scenes to print

Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary, showing the video and using the questions below (15’):

  • How did you feel about the activity?
  • Were some of the scenes difficult to respond to? Which ones and why?
  • Can you relate to any of the bullying scenes?
  • Do people who are bullied need help and support? Why?
  • Where can people who are bullied find help and support?
  • What are some of the reasons that people bully others? Are they fair?
  • What should you do if you’re being bullied and the person you turn to for help and support doesn’t do anything about it?
  • Is some bullying more often accepted by children and adults? Why or why not?
  • Who is responsible to help and support children when they are bullied?
  • What can be done to help people who bully change their behavior?
  • What happens if no one stops people who bully? To the bully? To the community?
  • Do you commit to respect the rules you settled up in the manifesto and spread them in your school?
Notes
Digital Resource

Video Ways to Stop Bullying” 

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/23/WaysStopBullying.mp4


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8 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Pink and Blue (Man and Woman)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 80
Energizers otherness     2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     20 - Holding legs

Participants work in pairs. And you can put a quiet and relaxing music (or sounds like water falling down, sea waves, etc.). 

Half of the participants are asked to lie down face up, eyes closed, with their left leg extended on the floor and their right leg elevated. Another participant stands up and loops a towel around the heel of the other’s right foot and holds the ends of the towel in his/her hands, and makes soft and gentle movements (upwards and downwards, and sidewards) while the other totally relaxes his/her leg. Then they repeat the same process with the left leg. Then the participants switch roles.

Objectives
  • To reflect about stereotypes related to the image of woman and man and to deconstruct them.

Preparation
  • Materials
  • Flipcharts or cartboards
  • Pens and crayons
  • Post-its
  • Different magazins
  • Scissors
  • Glue

Suggested reading: Pink and blue: the color of gender - Paolo Frassanito & Benedetta Pettorini -  https://www.researchgate.net/profile/Paolo_Frassanito/publication/5673081_Pink_and_blue_The_color_of_gender/links/5406edba0cf2c48563b27fd4.pdf 

Introduction

This activity aims to make students reflect about the stereotypes related to the image and roles related to woman and man, raise awareness about their origin and how media and society reinforce them. Through this “association game”, students will be asked to think to specific characteristic of woman and man and then reflect about which of them are stereotypes. 

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Methodology

NFE Tool : Group Game

  1. Students will draw a big figure of a man and one of a woman. (10)
  2. Teacher will ask them to think about specific characteristic of women and men and putting them through post-it on the figures. They can be everything that students relate to “woman” and “man”, colors, attitudes, words, jobs, objects, specific clothes ect. They can write the characteristics of drawn them or cut images or quotes from the magazines provided. (20)
  3. Students will reflect about gender stereotypes through the videos:

The first one, about Male Gender Stereotypes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxYvhh1hQvk ;

The second one about Female Gender Stereotypes: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDDqW9KvvSQ (15)

The teacher will ask students if they have ever thought before about why pink is the color of girls and blue of boys, as one of the main example of stereotyped characteristics related to gender. (10)

  1. The teacher will show the videos which explain this element: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgJ4dro7B9I  (10)

DT: - Video n. 1 - #HatchKids Discuss Male Gender Stereotypes – SheKnows – available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=QxYvhh1hQvk;

Video n.2 - #HatchKids Discuss Gender Roles and the Rise of #Femvertising – SheKnows – available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=sDDqW9KvvSQ;

Video n. 3 - Gender Bent | Pink for Girls, Blue for Boys | MTV – available at https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=xgJ4dro7B9I

 

Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary:

  • What do you think about gender stereotypes?
  • Have you ever thought before to the roles of Man and Woman and the origin of them
  • How do you feel about it? (15)
Notes
Digital Resource

video 1 http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/24/D8_1.mp4

video 2 http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/24/D8_2.mp4

video 3 http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/24/D8_3.mp4

video 4 http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/24/D8_4.mp4


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9 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Sexual Orientation
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 75
Energizers otherness     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     17 - Circle massage

The group forms a circle and faces one direction. Each participant places his/her hands on the shoulders of the person in front of her/him. Each person then gives the person who is in front a shoulder massage. The person being massaged can give a feedback. After a few minutes, the group turns the other way so that the person who has been making the massage is then receiving it in return.

Objectives
  • Learn the difference between gender identities and sexual orientation;
  • Learn different sexual orientations
  • Reflect on the right to express them, developing tolerant attitudes towards homosexuality, bisexuality, heterosexuality;
  • Identify stereotypes, prejudices and forms of discrimination based on sexual orientation and where to get support in the local community.
Preparation

 Suggested pedagogical resources and tips:

Tips:

Teachers have to pass the idea of respect and tolerance towards all sexual orientations. It is very important to create an atmosphere of ease and trust between them and the students and between the students themselves, avoiding mocking attitudes or scorn and derision.

If the activity takes place in the school library, teachers may use the books related to sexuality education, if they are available. If they aren’t, some of the answers are in the crosswords the students are going to do in next step. Other sexuality terminology can be found in Sexuality glossary (UCLA, 2016).

Materials:

Crosswords: gay, lesbian, queer, heterosexual, androgynous, bisexual, transgender, sexuality, gender, cisgender, LGBT, respect, tolerance, coming out, etc.

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Introduction

Sexual orientation is sexual attraction to another person. It is different from other aspects of sexuality like biological sex, gender identity (the psychological sense of being male or female, who do we identify as?). The orientation of sexual desire can be manifested in different forms: heterosexuality, homosexuality, bisexuality and asexuality. All of them are possible alternatives and none of them represents any type of risk (neither psychic nor physical) for the person or the social group, although heterosexuality is still considered by many people as the “norm”. Prejudices and negative stereotypes about homosexuality and bisexuality are still deeply imbedded in societies value systems and behaviours, which leads to unacceptable situations of diverse forms of discrimination.

Methodology

NFE tool: Presentation/discussion of ideas and word game.

  1. The students are asked to make groups (4-5 elements) and think, discuss and write a definition of gender identity and sexual orientation. 10’
  2. The subgroups present their definitions to the whole group, compare their definitions and formulate adequate definitions. If necessary, the teacher helps them doing this acting as a mediator. The teacher can ask for one voluntary student to write down on the board a common definition based on the definitions brought by the groups.  10’
  3. They are asked to divide in the same subgroups again. Each subgroup gets one paper with the following questions to answer together:
    • What does homosexual mean?
    • And heterosexual?
    • And bisexual?
    • Can you choose your sexual orientation?
    • When do we discover our sexual orientation? Why are there different sexual orientations?
    • Can we know sexual orientation just by looking at a person?
    • What does “coming out” mean and why can it be difficult?
    • What kind of support can he/she get in the local community? 15’
  4. The subgroups meet again to present and compare their answers, and they try to find together adequate answers for each question. The teacher, acting as a mediator, helps students to make correct conclusions and eliminate false beliefs. Note: The teacher can use books available at school library, so as the students know that the library has books related to sexuality education (and may use them later to get answers for their questions/doubts. 15’
  5. They do the crosswords mentioned above. 10’
Reflection

15’

  • Did you ever tackle the subject of sexual orientation at school or in other contexts?
  • Do you think everyone has the right to express their sexual orientation?
  • Is it important to be safe if one decides to tell he/she is homosexual or bisexual in a context where the majority is heterosexual? Why?
  • How did you feel about this activity?
Notes
Digital Resource

CrossWords - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/25/cruz.html

Sexuality glossary (UCLA, 2016) - www.lgbt.ucla.edu/Resources/LGBTQ-Terminology


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10 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Intolerance/Discrimination
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 80
Energizers otherness     19 - Grab the finger

In a circle, place right finger on next person s left palm.  Try to grab a finger before yours gets grabbed. After doing several times switch; place left finger on next person s right palm and repeat the process for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     16 - Press the face

It is like the game "telephone" but instead of passing a word or sentence around the group, participants pass a facial expression.
The group forms a circle with everyone having their eyes closed, except the person who is passing the "face" in the first place. The passer will tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him, that person will open her/his eyes to receive the face. She/He will then tap the shoulder of the person next to her/him and pass the face along. Once participants have passed the face they may keep their eyes open to watch it move around the group. At the end, the original passer receives the face from the last person in the group and then shows what the original face was.
 

Objectives
  • Approaching the concepts of cultural diversity and cultural sensivity to different forms of discrimination.
  • Raising awareness about discrimination and social/cultural exclusion, by reflecting on stereotypes and prejudices students have about other people.
  • Deepen the understanding that everyone has the right to equal (fair) treatment and social/cultural inclusion.
  • Exploring different ways to address the different forms of discrimination and intolerance.

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Preparation

Tips:

  • It’s better to tell the students that the sketch/theatre cannot exceed 5 minutes
  • It’s important that the forms of discrimination for the sketches are suggested by the students and not by the teacher. What he/she can do is to give 1 or 2 examples, but it’s only to explain better. The situations that are going to be used in the plot for the sketch should be the students’ own examples and not the teacher’s.
  • For instance, common examples of discrimination given by the teacher (so as students understand better the task) can be the following situations: i) when someone refuses to rent a house to a black person because she/he is black, ii) when an employer pays less to a woman than to a man for the same job, iii) when a person deserves a promotion at the workplace but doesn’t have it because he/she is perceived to be homosexual, etc.
  • As a follow up, the teacher can encourage students to rehearsal the puppet’s sketch, and organise an event to present their sketches theatre performances to other classes of the school, students’ families and/or local community.
  • The students can also publish the texts in the school or local newspaper, or make a small illustrated book with this material, etc., they can do it with the visual arts teacher.

Materials:

  • Copies of the story chart on the themes of different forms of discrimination, based on gender, ethnicity, social status, religious beliefs and practices, disability, age (or other forms), for producing a story based on real-life situations that students have experienced or know.
  • Paper and markers for writing the story that students are going to perform with puppets.
  • all kinds of recyclable materials and tools for making puppets.

Digital tool:

  • Video of European Intensive Programme Project (Claeys, 2012)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzcC1vw7GSI

  • pdf of story chart and topics of the plot for the puppet’s sketch

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/26_DIGITAL TOOLS D10.pdf

Introduction

History provides many examples of the way stereotypes and discrimination can escalate to all forms of violence, murders and even genocides. The multicultural diversity can enrich us as human beings but it can also lead to disinterest, indifference, intolerance and discrimination that exclude minorities from public services, employment and education opportunities, police custody and justice protection, housing, political representation, etc. It is very important to get awareness of our own stereotypes and prejudices to prevent intolerance and discrimination for a more humanized and peaceful coexistence, and to enjoy the multicultural diversity and learn from it.

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Methodology

NFE tools: Storytelling and role playing with puppets.

  1. The teacher invites the students to watch the video and discusses with them the potentials of puppet making and sketch performing. Students are divided in small groups (3-5 elements) working in one of the following specific form of discrimination. The teacher handles each group a small paper with one of the following forms of discrimination:

Group 1: discrimination based on gender (group 1),

Group 2: discrimination based on ethnicity

Group 3: discrimination based on social status,

Group 4: discrimination based on religious beliefs and practices,

Group 5: discrimination based on disability,

Group 6: discrimination based on age. 10’

  1. In these small groups students think about a realistic situation of discrimination and work on a story plot that approaches this specific type of discrimination (an eye witness account or an autobiographical incident, but it can be a situation told by someone else or that they know from the media) and decides a way to address. 15’

  1. Once the elements of each group have chosen the realistic situation and form(s) of addressing the intolerance/discrimination situation, they are given the story chart to help them producing a story plot about it. They write the plot in form of a dramatic text to be performed (dialogues for performing with a theatre puppets). 15’

  1. The groups make puppets with the recyclable materials and use them for representing the plot they created. 30’

  1. Students and teacher(s) reflect on stereotypes and prejudices that lead to all kinds of discrimination, based on the questions suggested below.
Reflection

Questions to ask students at the end of the activity: 10’

  • Describe your feelings while you were making the performance?
  • Does any story have something to do with your own stereotypes and prejudices? Which ones?
  • Would you like to perform the theatre for other classes of your own school, your families or elements of local community? Why?
Notes
Digital Resource
  • Video of European Intensive Programme Project (Claeys, 2012)

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=DzcC1vw7GSI

  • pdf of story chart and topics of the plot for the puppet’s sketch

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/26_DIGITAL TOOLS D10.pdf


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11 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Young-Old
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 45 45
Energizers otherness     5 - Good morning or evening

Everybody walks around the room greeting each other (as if everybody was their close friends) using words and gestures (shake hand, kiss, hug). Then they repeat the greeting in silence using only their eyes. When the exercise is over, the teacher asks students how did they feel with the two different ways of greeting (eg was it difficult, how did they manage to communicate, etc).

Relaxing Exercises otherness     18 - Making room

Participants are asked to raise their arms with palms facing up, imagining that they are pushing up the ceiling and are asked do a lot of strength in that direction to increase the space of the room where they are. Then they are asked to turn the arms down with palms facing down thinking that they are pushing down the floor. They are asked to push away the walls turning their left arm and palm to the wall on their left and their right arm and palm to the wall that’s on their right.

Objectives
  • Challenging mindset and perception of old age and young age;
  • Identify potentialities and necessities of younger and older people;
  • Understanding the importance of intergenerational actions for both younger and older people;
  • Bridging the gap between younger and older people.
Preparation

Tips:

Possible follow-up: teacher and students compile the projects and send them to local old age care institutions near the school, and implement one or some of the actions they planned in local community.

Materials:

Copies of the 7 question planning model mentioned below, A4 white paper and markers, computer, internet, video projector.

Digital Tools: Once we were young

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=c_XyFGFr29c

When Teenage Meets Old Age

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=gt4zhFpDiyc

Original digital tool: multimedia computer animation of the poem Beautiful Old Age by D.H. Lawrence. 

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Introduction

United Nations data shows the trend of aging population around the world. There are fewer working age people supporting more dependent younger people, which has consequences in labour issues (higher unemployment among younger people), in health services and social care, economic growth, etc., bringing challenges that could be faced in much more humanised and efficient ways if old age and living together with older people are not perceived/taken as a liability but instead as an advantage.

Methodology

NFE tool: Brainstorming, project planning.

Session 1:

  1. Students are invited to listen / to read the multimedia computer animation of the poem Beautiful Old Age by D.H. Lawrence (novelist and poet born in England in 1885).  5’
  2. They are asked if they share the poet’s vision/perception of old age and discuss about it and the reasons they have to think what they think.
  3. The teacher encourages them to express and share their perceptions, experiences, and ideas concerning vulnerabilities and capacities of younger and older people. 10’
  4. Students watch the 2 videos Once we were young and When Teenage Meets Old Age. 10’
  5. In pairs, they are asked to compare and register 2 differences and 2 similarities of the 3 documents (poem videos). 10’
  6. Students do a class brainstorming of ideas of possible ways for them to interact with people aged more than 60 years old. 10’

Session 2:

  1. The students are given a 7 questions model for planning a concrete intergenerational action to bridge the gap between young and old people, in a specific local context and they plan the action (they still work in pairs).They fill in the planning model: 1) what do we propose to do, 2) why doing it/ what for?, 3) Specifically what young and old people are going to interact, 4) how is it going to be done, 5) what’s needed to be done?, 6) when and (7) where can it be done. 30’
  2. They reflect on the activity (questions below). 15’
Reflection
  • Is there a part of the activity that you preferred? If yes, what part: reading the poem, watching the videos or planning concrete action? Why?
  • Do you think this activity had any impact on the way you see/perceive old age and the differences between older and younger people? If yes, try to describe the impact.
  • Would you like to implement one of the activities/actions of your projects? If no, why? If yes, which one(s)?
Notes
Digital Resource

Original digital tool: multimedia computer animation of the poem Beautiful Old Age by D.H. Lawrence. 

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/27/old_age_1.mp4


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12 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Religion
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 45 45
Energizers otherness     20 - Chief of clan

Everyone stands in a circle. One participant closes his/her eyes or steps out of the room. He/She will have to guess who is the chief of the clan. One participant volunteers to be the secret Chief (quietly, so the "guesser" can't hear anything). The chief begins an action such as snapping fingers, patting the tummy, or slapping knees, and everyone in the circle imitates him/her.  The guesser returns to the room and tries to figure out who the chief is. As the guesser looks around, the chief changes the action avoiding being detected.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives
  • Develop knowledge on religions and beliefs;
  • Discover different conceptions of life after death according to different religions, by interaction with members of those religions;
  • Identify situations of discrimination based on religion and beliefs;
  • Identify examples in national history of active discrimination and persecution of peoples based on their religion and beliefs, so as to acknowledge that the European countries have been responsible for inadmissible ideologies and practices not only of colonialism but also racial and religious discrimination.

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Preparation

 Suggested reading:

Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief, articles 1-3 and 6: http://www.un.org/documents/ga/res/36/a36r055.htm (UN, 2016)

European Convention on Human Rights, pages 10-12 and 48: http://www.echr.coe.int/Documents/Convention_ENG.pdf (Europe, 2016)

Arda Religion Dictionary: http://www.thearda.com/learningcenter/religiondictionary.asp (ARDA, 2016)

Tips:

  • It is very important that teachers give national or European examples (recent or ancient) to help students to deconstruct the common prejudice that only groups that claim to be Muslim persecute other religious groups. This dangerous prejudice is growing because of the refugee’s crisis, the Daesh and Boko Haram. For instance, the Crusades were an example of persecution and barbarities against Muslims and Jews by Christian Authorities.
 
  • If the activity takes place in the school library, teachers may use the books related to religions.  If there are no books on this subject, the Arda Religion Dictionary can be used (ARDA, 2016).
 
 
  • To simplify, students can use their own phones to do this activity (especially if cameras are not available or not enough).
 
  • In the reflection moment, try that the groups identify at least 4 reasons (for a yes or a no) in answering the question “Do you think that the visit of the religious representatives to the school was important? Why?” 
 
  • If there aren’t enough students to make 5 groups, the teacher can do the tasks attributed to groups 4 and 5.
 
  • To simplify, students can use their own phones to tape the interviews (especially if cameras are not available or not enough).

Materials:

  • Computers and internet for information research;
  • Digital video cameras tripods (or simple phones with cameras).
 


Digital tool:

Digital element match game of cards about religions: Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc.

Introduction

The 1981 Declaration on the Elimination of All Forms of Intolerance and of Discrimination Based on Religion or Belief protects religious freedom at national and international levels but there are many examples where/when this type of freedom is not a reality. Unfortunately, the are many cases of discrimination everywhere and in some countries active persecution of religious minorities. It’s a very complex and sensitive problem that has to be considered in early education, starting by scientific knowledge on the vast variety of religions and beliefs that represent different conceptions of life and death of the humankind, and the acknowledgment of the importance of respecting this diversity by not confusing religion and the things that man and women do in name of their religion.

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Methodology

NFE tool: Debate, game and video production

Session 1:

  1. The teacher introduces the activity (based on ideas above) and asks the students to work in pairs. 3’

  1. Students define religion in pairs. Then, the teacher handles a brief definition of religion or video projects the definition (it can be a very simple definition as in Arda Religion Dictionary). The teacher asks the class to comment on the differences and similarities of their definitions with the new one (of the dictionary). 10’

  1. Student are invited to play the digital card game in pairs. 7’

  1. In groups of 4/5 elements, the students are challenged to make a movie on what 2 or 3 different local religious representatives say about their religion’s perspective about life after death. They prepare a visit of local religious representatives to the school for interviewing them and videotaping the interviews. 
    • For this, they can divide the tasks 15’
      • Group 1 researches what religions are represented in local community and contacts;
      • Group 2 produces a small interview to the religious representative, so as to find out what is the conception of life after death according to that particular religion, including one (only one) more general question that students would like to be answered by this religious representative.
      • Group 3 writes the invitation for the religious representatives of local community to come to the school and talk about the conception of life after death.
      • Group 4 writes an application for authorization to film / photograph the guests.

  1. The subgroups meet and read aloud the documents they produced and any student of the class may contribute to comment and improve the documents with the help of the teacher. 10’

Session 2:

  1. The day of the visit of the religious representatives to the school, the students make and videotape the interviews. 30’
  2. Students reflect on the experience guided by the questions below or questions that they introduce themselves. 15’

As a follow up, the students can process the information for publishing in their school website or newspaper.

Reflection

Guided reflection:                                                                                               

  • Did you know all the religions that we talked about in this activity?
  • Do you think that the visit of the religious representatives to the school was important? Why?
  • How did you feel about this activity?
Notes
Digital Resource

Digital element match game of cards about religions: Christianity, Judaism, Islam, Buddhism, Hinduism, etc.

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/28/cartas.html


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13 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Social Status
Developed by AENAO
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     3 - Amoeba

An evolution game! Everyone starts off as an amoeba, with the purpose of evolving to a human. All students walk around acting like an amoeba and when they meet with another amoeba, they play one round of rock/paper/scissors. Whoever wins evolves into a worm. When two worms meet they play again rock/paper/scissors and whoever wins turns into a wasp, but whoever loses goes back to becoming an amoeba. This continues until one becomes human. The evolution stages are: amoeba à worm à wasp à chicken à monkey à human.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     15 - Moving like a toy

The teacher uses a magic word to change the students into many string-loaded (wind-up) toys. At the teacher’s signal, the toys start to move across the class, as many robots, to get their sits. They have to move more quickly at the beginning and then gradually more and more slowly, because their charge is finishing. Some of them will be frozen in the middle of the room, and the teacher has to give their cranks one more turn to help them reach their seats

Objectives
  • To get familiarized with social identities
  • To explore identity from another point of view
Preparation
  • Materials: None required
  • Tips: the following examples of conversations could be modified according to the preferences of the teacher and the needs of the students.
Introduction

“We may have all come in different ships but we are all on the same boat now”.          Martin Luther King Jr.

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Methodology

NFE Tool Talk as your… Identity and Diversity Toolbox https://www.salto-youth.net/tools/toolbox/tool/identity-and-diversity-tool-box.1365

Simulation exercise

  1. Students are divided into six groups. Each group is assigned with a role: a) parent, b) best friend, c) mayor, d) priest, e) brother/sister, f) principal of school.
  2. Students in each group must talk about themselves as the role of the group, i.e. in group (a) everyone speaks like they are a parent.
  3. The whole group represents people who live in small community where everyone knows each other.
  4. Begin conversations. Each conversation should last for about 15 - 20 minutes. Examples of conversations:
  • A new refugee family moves into the village. Their two children need to go to school. How would you react? Discuss.
  •  A circus is coming to town and everyone is excited. This circus however uses animals in the shows. What would you do? Discuss.
  • There is a song contest on TV where people of any age could participate. How do you feel about that? Discuss.
  • It is announced that there is funding for building a new sports field. What would it be and why? Discuss.

DT Video

Reflection

Teacher asks questions to students in the plenary:

  • How did you feel when talking as someone else?
  • Was it difficult to talk as a group of one character?
  • Do you find similarities between the roles and real life?      (15’)
Notes
Digital Resource

https://vimeo.com/166006201


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14 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Cultural / Ethnic Diversity
Developed by AENAO
Duration 100
Energizers otherness     5 - Good morning or evening

Everybody walks around the room greeting each other (as if everybody was their close friends) using words and gestures (shake hand, kiss, hug). Then they repeat the greeting in silence using only their eyes. When the exercise is over, the teacher asks students how did they feel with the two different ways of greeting (eg was it difficult, how did they manage to communicate, etc).

Relaxing Exercises otherness     8 - Seasons of the year

All players sit in a circle, but not too close to one another. The teacher moves like a plant during the seasons of the year.

Winter: the plants are small, weak and are crunched together on the ground.

Spring: through the stronger sunshine, the plants grow slowly and slowly rise.

Summer: through the warm sun, the plants slowly open their arms, the flowers open their blooms are stand up straight.

Autumn: the sun rays become weaker. The plants begin to slowly shrivel, the blooms and leaves begin to fall away.

Objectives
  • To become aware of new cultures.
  • To observe similarities/differences between cultures.
  • To being able to present a new culture.
  • To reflect about own cultural behaviours.
Preparation
  • Tip: the countries given below could be anything that fits in the description. However, if students have difficulties in assigning a country, these are examples that the teacher could give:
  • Group 1: Finland
  • Group 2: Nigeria
  • Group 3: India
  • Group 4: Alaska
  • Group 5: Papua New Guinea

  • Materials:

Pieces of clothing and personal items(teacher can ask students a few days prior to implementation of the exercise to bring these items),

Papers, markers.

Introduction

“Once you understand and appreciate other people’s cultural backgrounds, then you can also connect with them more”.

Unknown.

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Methodology

NFE Tool Simulation exercise, team work

NFE tool inspired from Intercultural nights in Youth Projects (see photos  and Intercultural game (Rafa Rafa))

  1. Students are divided in 5 groups. Each group represents a country from each continent.
  • Group 1: Country from North Europe
  • Group 2: Country from Central Africa
  • Group 3: Country from East Asia
  • Group 4: Country (frozen) from North America
  • Group 5: Country from Oceania where a lot of natives live.                          (5')
  1.  When students are assigned in the groups, they figure out which countries they should represent. 

NOTE: They will NOT reveal their country to the other groups.

If they are facing difficulties, teacher can give them examples (see Tips). According to the countries that the students represent, they will figure out customs of the country, traditional foods/dances, they can draw a flag, etc. Tip: they can use internet to find information.

They will find a space in the room (or in another room if available), and structure their country’s presentation.                                                                                                   (30')

  1.  Now, each group assigns a member of the group, the “visitor”. The “visitors” will visit all together each group, i.e. all “visitors” go to Group 1 (where obviously the “visitor” from group 1, stays with his/her group), then they visit Group 2, etc. During these visits, each group presents their country (customs, flag, food, etc), without giving the name of the country.

(15’ – 3’ per group)

  1. When all visits are complete, the “visitors” return to their own groups and describe what they have seen and learned. According to what the “visitor” is describing, the groups try to figure out which country was presented.                                                   (10')
  2. Finally, each group presents their country to the plenary and reveal the country that they present.

(15’ – 3’ per group)

DT Prezi Presentation

Photos from intercultural nights (to be seen prior to the exercise)

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Reflection

Teacher asks questions in the plenary:

  • How was it to prepare a presentation from a country other than yours?
  • Did you find similarities/ differences in your group’s country and your own country?
  • How was it for the “visitors” to present what they have learned to their own groups?
  • How was it to try to figure out which country was represented from the other groups?
  • Did you find similarities/ differences between the groups?

(20’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Prezi Presentation:

http://prezi.com/wrol9ilanqxu/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy


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15 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Hotel Great Europe (Country - Language)
Developed by AENAO
Duration 80
Energizers otherness     2 - Moo!!!

The teacher assigns randomly in a piece of paper (turned upside down on their desks)  each student with farm animal, i.e. ‘cow’, ‘horse’, ‘sheep’, ‘rooster’, etc. Once the students are informed of their animal role, they are instructed to walk around the room acting like the animal they are assigned (i.e. making its sound), in order to find their kind.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     6 - Bee breathing

The teacher instructs the students to get in a comfortable position to practice bee breathing. They have to imagine that they are sitting on a leaf or a flower petal, to sit straight and allow the leaf or petal to gently support them.

The teacher gives students the following instructions:

Breathe in, allowing the air to just gently come in through your nose, filling up your lungs.

As you breathe out, buzz like a bee. See how long your buzz can last. See how far your bee is going to fly before sitting down and resting again. Buzz. Buzz. Buzz.

On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a loud, strong buzz.

On the next breath, see if your bee can fly with a soft buzz.

When the exercise is finished, the teacher gives time for a short discussion:

Does it feel different with a strong or a soft buzz?

How does your body feel?

Optional (use if time allows): After breathing practice, draw a picture of a bumblebee and the leaf or flower that you were “sitting on” in your imagination. This picture can be used as a relaxation practice reminder. When you see the picture, practice being like a Bee on a leaf and practice a Bee breath.

Objectives
  • Raise awareness on cultural identities
  • Pointing at intercultural dialogue
  • Using languages others than the ones known
  • Using body language

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Preparation
  • Materials: Pieces of paper, pens/markers.

The teacher writes in pieces of paper the characters/situations listed below for Groups A-F and gives them to students once the groups are formed.

All descriptions are available in the D15 Hotel Great Europe.pdf file @

http://othernessproject.eu/en/activities_en/

  • Tips: Do not allow students to use any form of translation (i.e. from phones, tablets, dictionary etc)
Introduction

Intercultural dialogue is, essentially, the exchange of views and opinions between different cultures. Through intercultural dialogue people can establish linkages and common ground between different cultures and communities,  promoting at the same time understanding and interaction. 

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Methodology

NFE Tool Simulation, Team Work

Hotel Great Europe:

Students are divided into 6 groups (A-F). Group A has six students. Groups B-F have an equal number of students (i.e. 3 per group).

Group A: Hotel employees (receptionist, cleaner, cook, waiter/waitress, maitre, man at the elevator).

Group B: Portuguese group. Situation: The elevator is broken and we need to carry our luggage on the 4th floor.

Portuguese translation: O elevador está avariado e vamos ter que carregar as nossas malas até ao 4º andar.

Group C: Bulgarian group.

Situation: We need to have an early breakfast tomorrow (at 05.45). Where can we eat? One of us is also gluten intolerant.

Bulgarian translation: Утре сутринта искаме да закусим доста рано, към 6 без 15. Ще ни кажете ли къде да отидем? И още нещо, един от нас има непоносимост към глутен.

Group D: Italian group.

Situation: We need extra blankets and bath salts.

Italian translation: Abbiamo bisogno di altre coperte e bagnoschiuma

Group E: Greek group.

Situation: We have a reservation but lost our passports at the airport. How can we stay there? Where can we claim for passport loss?

Greek translation: Έχουμε κάνει κράτηση αλλά χάσαμε τα διαβατήριά μας στο αεροδρόμιο. Πώς μπορούμε να μείνουμε εδώ? Πού μπορούμε να δηλώσουμε απώλεια διαβατηρίου?

Group F: French group.

Situation: Our neighbors (a group of drunken people) are making a lot of noise and we cannot sleep.

French translation: Nos voisins (un groupe de personnes ivres) font beaucoup de bruit et nous ne pouvons pas dormir.

1. The groups are given their characters/situations and study them

  • Group A speaks English only (and their character’s names are given in English).
  • Groups B-F get their description FIRST in national language (i.e. group B gets the description in Portuguese, Group F in French etc). They are trying to figure out within their groups about the situation they need to describe and need to decide on whom they refer to in the hotel (i.e receptionist, cleaner etc).

Tip for the students: when trying to figure out what to do maybe you could think of what the people of the given country would do (i.e Group B for Portuguese, Group F for French etc).                             (15’)

2. Groups B-F go separately and try to describe their situation. They are not allowed to speak English or their mother language. They have 2 minutes per group to describe. When 2 minutes are finished, the person from group A tries to solve the situation, no matter if he/she has understood it (if the situation is not understood, then he/she guesses).   (20’)

3. When all groups are finished, then they get their situations written in English and trying to figure out how to explain to group A. They can only use English and body language.                   (5’)

4. They repeat step 2, but this time they can only use body language or English.                                                                                     (15’)

 DT Quiz

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Reflection

Questions from the teacher to students in the plenary:

For Group A:

How did you feel when

  • Trying to understand what the situation was?
  • Trying to solve the problem even though you were not sure you understood what you had to do?

For Groups B-F:

How did you feel when

  • Read the situation in language other than yours?
  • Trying to explain the situation using the given language?
  • Trying to figure out as a group how to explain the situation when thinking also about the country you represented.

 (20’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Play quiz http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/31/teste.html


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16 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Whose Body is this?
Developed by AENAO
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     12 - Body spelling

Teacher asks students to write their name in the air using different parts of their body, for example with the hand/leg/elbow/nose.

Optional: If time allows teacher asks to the class to spell out some words reproducing the letters with their bodies. Students can collaborate all together or can create different groups.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     2 - Progressive muscle relaxation

To release tension from head to toe, students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each. The teacher guides the students; he/she asks them to start with the feet and toes, then move up to the knees, thighs, rumps, chest, arms, hands, neck, jaw, and eyes—all while maintaining deep, slow breaths.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • To raise awareness on the similarities/dissimilarities of human bodies
  • To discover different abilities and skills according to own’s body
Preparation
  • Materials:

Large papers (i.e. flipcharts stuck together with paper tape or blue tack), markers, newspapers, magazines, scissors, glue.

Optional: old pieces of fabric/buttons, yarn

Introduction

Like everything in life, body is one of nature’s diversity. If we were all similar, nature would be boring!

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Methodology

NFE Tool Artistic creation (collage, drawing), team work, discussion.

NFE tool inspired by Compasito http://www.eycb.coe.int/compasito/ (Nancy Flowers, 2009, pp. 53-55).

  1. Students are divided in groups of 5-6 and draw one body per group. Each body should be made by drawing a specific member, i.e. one student lies down and the group draws his/her head, then another student lies down and the group draws his/her arms, etc. This process is repeated until all students have lied down and a member of their body is drawn. When all bodies are drawn, they place the parts and the abilities/skills on them.Tip: Abilities/skills can include whatever a person can do with a specific part of the body. i.e. a person has a beautiful voice and uses mouth to sing (so students could draw/stick a musical note on the mouth), a person can play football and uses legs to play the sport (so students could draw/stick a football on the leg), etc. Abilities/skills can be placed/drawn/stuck using the materials. Optional: Collages can then be stuck on the wall of the class or somewhere else in the school.                                            (40’)
  2. Each group presents their collage with the different parts and different skills/abilities.                                                            (10’)
  3. The teacher then initiates a conversation; they discuss all together on the ways that they can use these abilities and skills shown in the drawings according to everyone’s body dissimilarity/diversity. If something was different in their body, how could they adapt in order to have the abilities/skills shown in the drawings?          (20’)

DT Animated Video

Reflection

Teacher asks the following questions in the plenary:

  • Was it easy to find things you are able to do?
  • Are there big differences between the collages?
  • Do you think that everyone can have the same skills/abilities? Why?

(20’)

Notes
Digital Resource

https://vimeo.com/165849845 


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

119

otherness
17 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Social Inclusion and Sustainable Development
Developed by Prosveta
Duration 70 min.
Energizers otherness     16 - Back to back

Participants find a pair of similar size and weight. They sit on the floor, back to back with their pair. They hold their arms.  They have to get up, while keeping the arms and backs together. After trying once-twice with their pair they switch pairs. They can repeat this process with other pairs for a few times.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     12 - Warm back

A piece of paper is stuck to each student’s back and they are given a pen. The paper is already prepared. Each piece of paper says: “I like………..”. Slow music is played and the students walk around and write characteristics about the person whom they like on the paper. Each child is allowed to look at the paper at the end and take it home.

Objectives

Students will:

  • learn about sustainable development and the 17 Sustainable Development Goals;
  • learn what inclusive education is and why it is important through the problematic of their own environment;
  • develop their reasoning and presentation skills.
Preparation
  1. Suggested reading:
  1. Materials and equipment: a laptop and a beamer, markers and flip charts (big sheets of paper for the mind maps)
  2.  Digital tool resources: D17_1, D17_2, D17_3
Introduction

“Education for Sustainable Development empowers learners to take informed decisions and responsible actions for environmental integrity, economic viability and a just society, for present and future generations, while respecting cultural diversity.”

UNESCO definition

Methodology
  1. Students watch the video about sustainable development and write down two things that come to their minds while watching. After that they share thoughts in couple and discuss and prioritize. Possible experiences are shared as well. Each group reports publicly their thoughts.

NFE tool: Snowballing

Digital tool: D&SI_17_1                                                                                             10’

  1.  As a preparation for next activity, students watch the video presentation D17_2. They are told that they will receive a task and will have to discuss possible changes in the school from the perspective of other people. The video is a source of some ideas they might use.                                                                                                       5’
  2. Students are split in 4 groups. Each group steps in the shoes of one actor in the field of education. Group 1 – parents (P); Group 2 – students (S); Group 3 – teachers (T); Group 4 – policy makers PM (heads of schools, ministry of education officials). The task of each group is to discuss and agree on what it takes to build a dream school considering social inclusion (taking into account the specific aspects of the local community where students live). In each group (P, S, T, PMs), the participants discuss and agree on (1) their goal(s) and (2) plan specific actions in order to achieve the goals. The teacher (tutor) joins the group of the Teachers. NFE tool: blue skies thinking (link). All ideas are recorded on paper.                                                       10’
  3. Each group discusses the suggested ideas and shortlists the most relevant ones having listened to the arguments of the authors.                                                     5’
  4. The groups present their ideas to the class in the following sequence: S, P, T, PM. Each group (apart from the S, as they are the first ones) takes into consideration the ideas (goals and actions) suggested by the previous ones and possibly reshapes their suggestions (accepting or editing some goals and actions).                           15’
  5. Final wrap-up: the groups make a mindmap describing the goals and actions planned to create their dream inclusive school with the corresponding responsibilities for each action planned (S, P, T, PM).
Reflection

Guided reflection:                                                                                                 10’                            1. How did you feel during the training? Students go to one of the space marked with the feeling which represents their overall emotion regarding the training activity as a whole: 1. Interested ; 2. Content; 3. Confused; 4. Surprised; 5. Excited; 6. Happy; 7. Embarrassed; 8. Nervous. When students split in the groups, they share in the group why they chose this feeling. After that one representative of the group reports to the other groups the why the students from his group have chosen the corresponding feeling. Flashcards with the feelings 

2. Which training activity did you like most? (1. Learning about sustainable development OR 2. "My Dream school regarding social inclusion" activities)  - mentimeter voting.

3. How can you make use of what you have learned in the training?

Notes
Digital Resource

D17_1 Video about sustainable development - activity 1

D17_2 Interactive presentation - to be used with activities 2 to 5

D17_3 - how to put subtitles in different languages on YouTube videos (step-by-step guide)


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

120

otherness
18 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Climate change and poverty
Developed by AENAO
Duration 75 min
Energizers otherness     15 - Animal roundup

The teacher tells to the class to silently think of an animal. Then he/she tells to the group that without talking, they need to arrange themselves on a line from largest to smallest animals. Group members can only make gestures and the noise of their animal. After they have finished, teacher ask to the students to say the animal they were supposed to be to see if the order is correct.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     8 - Seasons of the year

All players sit in a circle, but not too close to one another. The teacher moves like a plant during the seasons of the year.

Winter: the plants are small, weak and are crunched together on the ground.

Spring: through the stronger sunshine, the plants grow slowly and slowly rise.

Summer: through the warm sun, the plants slowly open their arms, the flowers open their blooms are stand up straight.

Autumn: the sun rays become weaker. The plants begin to slowly shrivel, the blooms and leaves begin to fall away.

Objectives

To become aware of climate change and its consequences

Preparation
  • Suggested Reading:

https://www.coe.int/en/web/europarisks/climate-change-impact

https://www.science.org.au/files/userfiles/learning/documents/climate-change-r.pdf (pages 6-19)

https://www.onedayswages.org/2017/06/09/5-ways-climate-change-affects-poverty/

  • Materials: whiteboard/flipchart, paper, markers, D18 Scenario.pdf
Introduction

“We will never end poverty if we don’t tackle climate change.”

Jim Yong Kim

Methodology

NFE Tool Brainstorming, Role play

  1. Teacher first asks students to brainstorm about climate change and how this can be related to poverty.(10’)
  2. Students are getting ready for the role-play. Teacher assigns with students the roles:

A. Narrator

B. Leader of the group

C. 4-6 members of the group – depending on how many students wish to participate.(5’)

3. Students are studying the scenario (D18 Scenarion.pdf) and prepare for the play. They also assign an object (or prepare something quickly) as a time machine.(30’)

* While students are preparing for the play, the rest of the students are preparing and/or assisting with their speech to the governor’s with the guidance of the teacher.

4. Students are performing.(15’)

Reflection

Teacher asks questions to students in the plenary:

  • How did you feel when you realized how poverty is connected to climate change?
  • Was it difficult to imagine the world in 50 years from now?
  • How did you feel when preparing the speech to the governors? Do you consider something fighting for?

 (15’)

Notes
Digital Resource

http://me-you-us.eu/atividades/digital/643/643_An_alternate_future.mp4

http://me-you-us.eu/atividades/pdf/643_D18 Scenario.pdf


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

121

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19 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Phobias and isms
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva | Ana Torres | Maurício D
Duration 45 m
Energizers otherness     6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives

To understand the concepts of "difference" and "diversity";

To distinguish the concepts of racism, xenophobia, homophobia and others proposed in this activity, relating them to the concept of diversity;

Identify ways of peaceful coexistence, respecting differences.

Preparation

Preparation: The facilitator can previously search for definitions of racism, xenophobia, homophobia, etc., that can be used to support his/her own reflection on the matter, or read the document suggested below.

Suggested Reading: Committed to making a difference. Racism, antisemitism, xenophobia, and intolerance and their impact on young people in Europe, Symposium Report, edited by Ingrid Ramberg, 2005, available at https://rm.coe.int/committed-to-making-a-difference-eng/1680902e40

Tips: Depending on the characteristics of the group, the facilitator can mark the time limits of each step of the challenge of this activity by tapping 2 palms, playing a drum or a horn.

Materials: Computer, video projector, internet, sheets of paper, pens.

Digital tool: infographic about differences and similarities between the concepts "difference" and "diversity":

 https://www.canva.com/design/DADaN0ypzow/61ocmnKROTM0tDKid7qJCQ/edit

Introduction

The immigration resulting from globalisation and higher interdependence between nations enhances cultural diversity of minority groups and communities. Faced with the huge influx of refugees fleeing the war in Syria and other countries where the situation is unstable, Europe has to deal with a major humanitarian tragedy, and several European countries are refusing to accept refugees. 

So, it is even more important today to promote inclusion and actions against intolerance, xenophobia, racism and other isms, while valuing respect for cultural and social diversity.

Methodology

The facilitator approaches the concepts of difference and diversity, explaining the differences between the two by using the presentation of the digital infographic mentioned above. Remind the participants that the activity is a challenge and they must pay attention to the explanation. (5 minutes)

Then briefly explains that the challenge that he/she will propose next is time limited and divides the group in small groups of 3 elements, delivering to each group a blank A5 size sheet of paper and a pen, as well as the challenge document shown below (printed in A4 size paper) that contains the solutions of a crossword puzzle and the steps of the challenge to be realized. (5 minutes)

CHALLENGE DOCUMENT TO BE GIVEN TO EACH GROUP

Before starting, your group should read, in low voice, (3 minutes) all the following steps. You can start responding to the challenge only after knowing all you have to do, so you must read all this document before starting.

  1. Observe the solutions of the following set of crossword puzzles (2 minutes)

2. Search in on-line dictionaries, encyclopedias and/or articles for definitions of each word. Because the challenge is time limited, you should decide which member of the group looks for each word. Each member of the group must take note of the definition and bibliographic source that he/she used (writing down at least the type of source and the link of access). (5 minutes)

3. Read, in a low voice, all the word definitions (each group member reads the words and matching definitions that he/she searched for). Reflect, in the group, on the characteristics that all the words have in common and make a list of these characteristics on the front of the small sheet of paper (A5 size) (5 minutes).

4. Explain how these characteristics relate to the concept of diversity, based on the digital infographics that was shown before the challenge, registering the explanation on the back of the A5 paper (5 minutes).

5. Identify 2 forms of action to promote, in the community, a more peaceful coexistence among people (5 minutes).

6. Change the small paper with the one from another group and read (in your group) the one from the other group (2 minutes)

At the end of the activity, the participants can be encouraged to create a crossword puzzle (individually or in small groups), on the theme of peaceful coexistence, using the Online Crossword Puzzle Maker, available in https://www.puzzle-maker.com/CW

You can also invite the class to challenge the whole school community to solve the crossword puzzle proposed here, as well as those created by the working groups with the Online Crossword Puzzle Maker.

Reflection

Reflection: (10 minutes) 

The facilitator asks the participants to share and reflect on the forms of action to promote a more peaceful coexistence among people that they suggested. Then asks them if they can commit themselves to carry on some of these forms of action in their local/school community. 

Other digital resources: dictionaries, encyclopedias, articles and other sources of information to be searched by the participants.

Notes

Follow-up

After getting to know the definitions of the -phobias and -isms from activity 1, students can be asked to look up for imajes that illustrate the words and create games making use of https://wordwall.net/ (quiz template) with the image and 4 possible answers choosing from the -phobias and -isms from activity 1. This encourages students' understanding of the terms and boost their creativity.

Digital Resource

Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

122

otherness
20 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Diversity and Identities
Developed by SAN University of applied sciences
Duration 75 min.
Energizers otherness     9 - Balloon pop

Have everyone form a circle. Instruct the participants to put one piece of information about themselves, e.g. I have 2 sisters, or my mother is called Samy,  on a small slip of paper, fold it, and put it in a blown up balloon. Throw the balloons in the middle of the circle and then have people take turns popping a balloon, reading the piece of paper, and guessing to whom the information applies. Participants could wander round the room asking ‘yes/ no’ questions to the other participants but not exactly the statement from the paper slip, e.g. they cannot ask “Have you got 2 sisters? But could ask “Have you got sisters?” and then “Have you got more than 1 sister?’, “Have got less than 3 sisters?”, etc. Game finishes when all participants have identified the author of the paper slip they have.

*Note: this exercise should be used if there is enough time.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     5 - Use a word that describes their feelings/thoughts

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) for a minute and think of a word that describes their feelings/thoughts after finishing the resource. Then the students open their eyes and one by one say their word to the classroom

Objectives
  • To understand the idea of identity.
  • To understand the difference between personal and social identity.
  • To understand the variety of factors building the identity.
  • To accept other identities.
Preparation

Suggested reading:

https://www.differencebetween.com/difference-between-personal-identity-and-vs-social-identity/

Tips: What is very important here, is to help to understand the balance between the personal and social dimension of life. Who we are, is the average of our personal features and what is derived from the culture we live in. It is important, that before this lesson students should have at least basic knowledge what is culture and about its multidimensional nature. One of the aims of this lesson should be the merge of the personal and social identity at the age when the defiance of the social norms and patterns occurs.

Materials: Papers, color markers

Digital resources: presentation about identities (DSI_20)

Introduction

We are individuals. But this individuality is being built gradually. It is not like we wake up some day and decide to be someone. So how it becomes that we are who we are? And what can be similar and different among all of us?

Methodology

NFE Tools: Mind map, brainstorming, elements of blue skies thinking (in reflection about 4)

  1. Introductory exercise: let everyone draw an animal that represent him/herself best   5’
  1. Give another sheet of paper to every student and ask to write “ME” in the center of the paper. Then ask to give as many features of themselves as they can think out. It can be: age, nationality, race, sex, origin, character features (e.g. brave, shy, etc.), what they like, dislike. Give them specific examples from page 3 of (DSI_20), without paying their attention to the types of the features.                                          5’
  2. Then, ask students to group the features according to the types, but do not give them these types in advance (if they ask what types do you mean, try to explain that they have to find them by themselves by searching for everything that these features may have in common), let students group the features by themselves (likes, nature features, age, sex, origin, etc.).                                                                                  10’
  3. Ask about the categories and try to write some of them at the blackboard (e.g. likes, character features, hair, favorite subject, etc.). Then group students according to these: “who has blond hair, who dark, who red?”; “who likes math, who history, etc.”  “who likes tomato soup, mushroom, broth, etc.”, and so on. Pay students’ attention that everyone can be inside some group, but also often we are in many different groups, what depends on the type of the feature.

Reflection: There are a lot of types of features that makes us and our personality, but these features are mostly common, so we can easily find someone with the same feature? 15’

  1. Explain the difference between personal and social identity. Use pages 4, 5 and 6 from (DSI_20).                                                                                                          10’
  2. Ask every student to write:
  • What feature of mine is strictly mine?
  • What feature of mine is imposed by family/society/friends?
  • What imposed features I can save and why?
  • What Imposed features I could give up without regret?                                      15’
Reflection
  1. Make a discussion about the 4. Try not to push any students to reveal their personal features, but encourage to discuss about the variety of social features that build our identity and let us live together in harmony                                                              20’
  2.  The discussion should be summed up that the more features we have around us, the richest identity we can have.                                                                                      5’
Notes

Extra information on the topic for the teacher.

Digital Resource

Work sheets DSI_20


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

123

otherness
21 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / Careers for everyone
Developed by Altius Foundation
Duration 80
Energizers otherness     20 - Chief of clan

Everyone stands in a circle. One participant closes his/her eyes or steps out of the room. He/She will have to guess who is the chief of the clan. One participant volunteers to be the secret Chief (quietly, so the "guesser" can't hear anything). The chief begins an action such as snapping fingers, patting the tummy, or slapping knees, and everyone in the circle imitates him/her.  The guesser returns to the room and tries to figure out who the chief is. As the guesser looks around, the chief changes the action avoiding being detected.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     21 -
Objectives

Main goal:  To form skills to identify personal and social problems associated with the risk of social exclusion and professional maladaptation.

Aims:

  • Exploring career stereotypes and prejudices (video "Two Roma Worlds");
  •  Identification of specific problems and opportunities for helping peers to succeed in planning and realizing their career goals;

 Development of social skills for cooperation and formation of positive attitude towards everyone's career development.

Preparation

Materials required:

  • Colored A4 for each student (D21_1. Airplanes)
  • Printed Work slips (D21_2. Chinese proverbs)
  • Laptop and video projector (D21_3. Movie)
  • Аn A4 envelope for each participant, newspapers / magazines, glue, scissors (D21_4. and D21_5. Collage of “my self”)

Digital resources:

Introduction

Happiness does not come down to the possession of money; it is in the joy of work and achievement. - Franklin Roosevelt

The right to work is a fundamental human right. According to the Universal Declaration of Man:

• everyone has the right to work and to a free choice of career / profession / job;

• everyone, without any discrimination, is entitled to equal pay for equal work;

• еvery person who works has the right to social protection.

Methodology
  1. D21_1. Airplanes (NFE tools: art creation, idea generation, group work; DT: D21_1);                                                                                                                  15’
  2. D21_2. Interpretation of Chinese Proverbs (NFE tools: small group discussions; DT: D21_2)                                                                                              15’
  3. Video "Two Roma Worlds" (NFE tool - Reciprocal Maieutic method RMA; DT D21_3)                                                                                                                  15’
  4. Collage of My Self - Part I (NFE tool: Artistic creation and RMP Method; DT D21_4)                                                                                                                  15'
  5.  Collage of My Self - Part II (NFE tool: Artistic creation and RMP Method; DT D21_5)        
Reflection

Suggested questions to be discussed with the students:

1. What are the personal strengths that you will use to achieve your career goals?

2. How did you feel while watching the video “Two Roma Worlds”?

3. Imagine talking to your family about your career / profession plans? What will you tell them?

Notes
Digital Resource

D21_1_2_4_5.pdf

D21_3 - video "Two Roma worlds"


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

124

otherness
22 othernessDiversity and Social Inclusion / What is it like to be hunted?
Developed by ISJ Dolj
Duration 90’
Energizers otherness     8 - Find another seat:

Have the students sit on chairs in a circle, with the number of chairs being one less than the number of students. The student without a chair stands in the middle and tells their name. Then the student calls out a characteristic or a colour, or type of clothing, e.g. “Everyone wearing orange!”. All participants who are wearing orange must get up and find another seat, but not the one immediately to their right or left. The student in the middle races to find a seat and the person left standing becomes the next caller in the middle.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • The manifestation of the joy of being with others by adopting states of acceptance, tolerance, negotiation, collaboration, solidarity.
  • Stimulating self-confidence and self-esteem in relation to others.
  • Reducing prejudices and stereotypes related to disadvantaged people (people with disabilities, people belonging to ethnic minority groups, etc.).
  • Involvement of critical thinking and analysis and interpretation capabilities.
Preparation
  • Required materials: 1-4 balls, A4 sheets, pencils/pens,computer and video projector/listed material.
  • NFE methods: debate, team work.
Introduction

In today's increasingly globalized society, the circulation of information and, implicitly, of opinions is made with great ease. When the freedom of opinion is very large there is the possibility of abusing this right. Hate speech promotes aggression towards some social categories. In the hate speech, some people are often considered to be guilty of serious problems faced by society (the scapegoats). Hate speech is based on preconceived ideas about different groups of people. Promoting preconceived ideas through hate speech in a tense social context can generate discrimination, segregation and even persecution or social conflict.

Methodology

NFE methods: debate, team work, text analysis.

  1. The teacher plays the video for the students. After watching it, the class discusses the message of the video (different opinions are accepted). In the discussion, there could be analyzed the following aspects: the perceptions of the characters, their emotions, feelings, ideas and attitudes, but also the students’ perceptions, emotions, feelings, ideas and attitudes after watching the video.                                                              15'
  2. The teacher divides students into groups of 4-5 students. Each group is assigned one of the four hate speech messages (D22_2). The members of the group have the task to analyze, discuss and reject the statements from the hate speech messages. The teacher has the role of moderating the debate, allowing each group to express their point of view. If necessary, the teacher will intervene to counteract some possible points of view in favor of hate speech.                                                                       25'
  3.  Each group of students is invited to make a brief statement against the hate speech message they have been assigned. Students are asked to write on a flipchart their suggestions of ways to combat hate speech, answering the question: "What can I do to have no hate speech in my school?"                                                                      20'
Reflection

Students discuss the following questions:

  • Who is the aggressor and who is the victim in a hate speech?
  • Why are there people who tolerate and even like hate speech?
  • How should you react to a hate speech messages?
  •  What did you learn from today's activities?
Notes
Digital Resource

Video 

Hate speech messages 


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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Identity and Active Citizenship

126

otherness
1 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / My identities – me as a person, me as a citizen
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 60
Energizers otherness     17 - Toaster or Rock Star

The group starts in a circle with one person in the center. The person in the center points at someone in the circle and says “Toaster” or “Rock star”.

  • If the person in the center says “toaster”, the person being pointed at needs to crouch down and jump up and say “butter me I’m done.” The people on either side should arms up and out strait creating a “toaster” around the person being pointed at.
  • If the person in the center says “Rock star”, the person being pointed at needs to hold his/her hands in front of their mouth as if he/she were singing into a microphone. The people on each side turn away from the person who’s been pointed at and pretend to play the guitar.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     2 - Progressive muscle relaxation

To release tension from head to toe, students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each. The teacher guides the students; he/she asks them to start with the feet and toes, then move up to the knees, thighs, rumps, chest, arms, hands, neck, jaw, and eyes—all while maintaining deep, slow breaths.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • Promote consciousness about some differences between personal identity and citizen identity;
  • Understanding that personal characteristics influence our citizen actions, concerns, and our engagement in community life;
  • Reflecting on the possibility to change our personal characteristics to be a better citizen. 
Preparation

Suggested pedagogical resources:

European Union rights and obligations (EC, 2016)

http://ec.europa.eu/justice/discrimination/rights/index_en.htm

Materials:

White paper and red and blue markers

Digital tools:

Alphabet soup with words related to personality traits: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/33/sopa.swf

True and false 10’ quiz about rights and obligations of European citizens - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/33/quiz1.html

127

otherness
Introduction

Our person’s identity (unique characteristics that distinguish us from others) influences persons around us, our relations and ways of interacting with others in a territory (neighbourhood, local community, nation, union of nations, etc.) Many different factors can determine our personal identity. One of those is our personality, and it can change if we take active steps to become the person who we want to be. According to the definition of European Union citizenship, every person holding the nationality of a Member State is a citizen of the EU. Nationality is defined according to the national laws of that State. Citizenship of the Union is complementary to, but does not replace, national citizenship. EU citizenship implies some more rights and obligations (duties) than national ones. 

Methodology

NFE tools: Brainstorming, word game and quiz

  1. Brainstorming about what we are as persons and what we are as citizens. Teacher introduces the concepts of personal identity and citizen identity based on the introduction suggested above. 15’
  2. Students do the alphabet soup with words related to some personality traits (see above). 10’
  3. Students are divided in 2 teams and make the true and false quiz about rights and obligations of European citizens, and have 10 minutes to try to organise the person’s characteristics of the alphabet soup that they think are likely to influence more positively or negatively the relations and well-being of European citizens (according to their rights and obligations), by writing each characteristic in a simple table with 2 columns using red marker for (more) negative and blue marker for (more) positive. 10’
  4. Then the 2 teams compare and discuss the results. In case of divergent perspectives, at least one element of each team has to give an explanation of his/her team’s choice 10’
Reflection

Guided reflection: 15’

  • Is that so simple to divide some personality traits into negative and positive traits?
  • Does being a citizen imply to assume responsibilities and taking actions to improve the community life of a territory (neighbourhood, local community, nation, union of nations, etc.)?
  • Is it possible to change our personal characteristics to be a better citizen? 
Notes
Digital Resource

Alphabet soup with words related to personality traits: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/33/sopa.html

True and false 10’ quiz about rights and obligations of European citizens - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/33/quiz1.html


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2 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / The school as a place for active citizenship
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 60
Energizers otherness     6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     14 - Give me your energy

The students stand in a circle. The teacher starts, pretending he/she is holding a ball on the hands and passing it to the student on his/her right; this one do the same, until the ball comes back to the teacher. The ball needs to be passed in a gentle way, as it is very precious. At the second round, the teacher passes the ball to students in another side of the circle, making a gesture and a noise. The students will do the same until everyone will have touched the ball at least once.  The ball can be passed in any way (in form of kick, kiss…), pretending it becomes bigger or smaller depending on the will of the students. 

Objectives
  • Discuss rights and obligations of students and teachers in the school;
  • Developing skills for respecting rights and obligations;
  • Reflect on the importance of proactive forms of citizenship in changing school everyday life for the better.
Preparation

Tips:

  • The teacher can do this activity after or referring to a real particular school situation in which the rights and obligations of students and/or teachers were not respected.

Materials:

  • None

Digital tool:

Introduction

Although students, teachers and other school staff play different roles in the school, they all have the responsibility of promoting well-being and peaceful coexistence among all. They can be (or not) actively engaged in this citizenship challenge, analysing their practices and actions in the light of education for development and citizenship.

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Methodology

NFE tool: role play.

  1. The teacher guides a brainstorming of rights and obligations of students and teachers for the well-being and good functioning of everyday school life. 10’
  2. They identify and write down existing practices/situations of lack of respect of those rights and obligations in everyday school life (like for instance pass ahead of everyone in the canteen queue or any other type of queue). 10’
  3. They divide in small groups (4-5 elements). Each group is given one of the bad practices/situations for the well-being and good functioning of everyday school life, and suggests changes for better quality of school life. 10’
  4. Each group acts out the situation in form of a role play in order to show the bad practice/situation and what would be the good practice/situation. 15’
  5. After the show of role plays, the teacher shows the movie To do or not to do, and guides a reflection using the questions below. 15’
Reflection
  • Did you recognize some of the practices/situations performed by the groups in the movie? Which ones?
  • Did you like and would you use the solutions showed in role plays or/and the movie? 
  • What other solutions would you suggest in some of those situations in order to have a better functioning of everyday school life, understanding the other people’s needs and rights?
Notes
Digital Resource

Video To do or not to do:

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/34/Todoornottodo.mp4


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3 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Me as a citizen of the local community
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 75
Energizers otherness     8 - Find another seat:

Have the students sit on chairs in a circle, with the number of chairs being one less than the number of students. The student without a chair stands in the middle and tells their name. Then the student calls out a characteristic or a colour, or type of clothing, e.g. “Everyone wearing orange!”. All participants who are wearing orange must get up and find another seat, but not the one immediately to their right or left. The student in the middle races to find a seat and the person left standing becomes the next caller in the middle.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     3 - Guided breathing

Teacher asks the students to close their eyes (if comfortable), inhale for a count of four, then exhale for a count of four (all through the nose, which adds a natural resistance to the breath). Then, with one hand on the chest and the other on the belly, the students can take a deep breath in through the nose and exhale through the mouth, ensuring this way that the diaphragm (not the chest) inflates with enough air to create a stretch in the lungs

Jordan Shakeshaft

Objectives
  • Understanding that community planning affects the quality of life of citizens;
  • Become aware of the role of citizens in participating in decision-making and action-taking in community development planning: collecting data about reality (needs and potentials) and project design for change;
  • Develop ideas and design proposals for community change.
Preparation

Suggested reading:

Tips:

  • The teacher and students can send the link of the e-book to the community planning department (community councillor) of the place where you live, with a short message explaining that the e-book contains students’ wishes and proposals for improving the quality of life in the community. In alternative or complementary, they can publish the e-book in the school site.

Materials:

  • White board, board marker, cameras for taking pictures, computers, internet, etc.

Digital tool:

StoryJumper or other basic software for making ebooks.

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Introduction

Article 12 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child states the importance of assuring that the children who are capable of forming their own views have the right to express them freely in all matters affecting them. Opportunities for expressing the children’s views have to be provided and those views must be given due weight. The planning and functioning of a community affects the quality of life of its citizens. Children and Young people represent an important part of the population and have a right to take an active part in decisions that affect the well-being and well-functioning of their local community (neighbourhood, city, village). Teachers and community planners have the responsibility to promote opportunities for them to exercise this right of citizenship.

Methodology

NFE tools: project planning and e-book creation.

Preparation:

  • One week before the activity, the teacher asks students to read articles 12 and 13 of the Convention on the Rights of the Child and introduces the topic that the well-functioning of the community is everyone’s responsibility and that students have the right to be heard and to contribute to community planning and change. And that responsibility means doing something to take care of the neighbourhood/city/village, to solve or contribute to solve problems, to plan actions to make it better. The teacher asks students to bring to classroom a picture (taken by them) of a thing or a place in neighbourhood/city/village where they live and that They would like to change, with their help, to make it safer, cleaner, more beautiful, more fun, more friendly, more colourful. 10’

Activity The community as I would like it to be:

  1. Students have to orally present their photo and the aspect of reality that they would like to change, while one student or the teacher writes down on the board all the ideas for change. 15’
  2. Then they have to organise the aspects of reality in 3 categories:

Category 1: What can be done soon (with students’ contribution),

Category 2: What can be done (with student’s contribution) under certain conditions that seem feasible,

Category 3: What doesn’t seem feasible at the moment. 10’

  1. Students choose 3 aspects from Category 1 and make 3 different e-books for change (with the digital tool for making e-books). They work in pairs, each pair being responsible for preparing one page of each of the 3 e-book(s):
  • Cover and a title like My community as I would like it to be,
  • They can dedicate it to their community councillor (if they want),
  • Technical file of the book with the authorship, date, location, etc.
  • Page 1: very short introduction explaining the activity;
  • Page 2: photo and legend of the precise location (of the place or thing to change),
  • Page 3: description of reality,
  • Page 4: description of the reality as we would like it to be,
  • Page 5: ideas for changing
  • Page 6: at least one idea that involves the participation of students and school in the process of change.
  • More pages can be added according to students’ and teacher’s ideas. 30’

5. The teacher guides the reflection suggested below  10’

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Reflection
  • Imagine the planning councillor read your e-book and wants to do something with your proposals. How prepared are you to do the things you proposed in the e-book(s)?
Notes
Digital Resource

StoryJumper (https://www.storyjumper.com) or other basic software for making ebooks.


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4 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / The active citizen knows the public institutions which are important for citizenship activities
Developed by IP SANTAREM
Duration 60
Energizers otherness     11 - Alphabetical order

Students make a circle with the chairs, take off their shoes and get on the chairs (one per person - the circle needs to be as close as possible). Standing on the chairs and just moving from one to another one without getting off, students have to arrange themselves in alphabetical order according to their name. As soon as they are ready, teacher will check if they are right; if not they continue until they are right. 

Relaxing Exercises otherness     4 - Visualization using color/soothing sound

Facilitator asks the students to imagine a favorite color that makes them feel peaceful and safe. They keep their imagine taking in that color with each breath and sending it throughout their entire body as they exhale. They continue until they visualize being filled with their special, relaxing color. The same exercise can be performed using soothing sound or aroma. Also, it is more effective if relaxing music is used.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • Understand the different levels of governance and who is responsible for what;
  • Reflect on local governance and democracy;
  • Develop knowledge on local public institutions.
Preparation

 Suggested reading:

  • European public institutions for active citizenship. (EU, 2016)

http://europa.eu/about-eu/institutions-bodies/index_en.htm

Tips:

  • At the end of the reflection, the teacher can handle information on national and European public institutions for active citizenship. For and European public institutions for active citizenship, use the reference above.
  • The different levels of governance are different from country to country (local, regional national, etc.) but the more important is to focus on local level of governance.
  • For the organogram production, teacher can show the following template hierarchy layout: http://www.organogramtemplate.org/

Materials:

  • White paper, colour markers, adhesive tape (or other materials for fixing paper on a wall or board); computer and videoprojector.

Digital tool:

Animated movie on local governance, like Once upon a time, local democracy - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/36/Once upon a time, local democracy.mp4

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Introduction

Everyone can take part and action in the process of social, cultural, technological, economical change, practicing citizenship individually or collectively, for more equality, social justice, democracy, etc. For that, it’s crucial to know and search for public sector institutions and governmental structures. Local authorities are territorial authorities, with representative bodies that aim to pursue the interests of citizens. The members of local authorities are usually directly elected by citizens who are registered in a particular territory. That’s one of the reasons why local public institutions are the closest to citizens. Therefore, to promote active citizenship, students should get acquainted with local public institutions.

Methodology

NFE tool: organogram creation of the structure of local government and interaction with local representatives.

  1. Students watch the movie on local governance. The teacher asks the students what they think local governance is, introducing the topic of different levels of governance, which are different from country to country (local, regional national, etc.). 10’

  1. The teacher asks the students to work in small groups (4-5 elements) and list the different levels of governance they think there are in their country and try to write down some responsibilities of each level. 10’

  1. The groups are then asked to look for information and draw organograms of their local government, in A2 sheets of white paper, with colour markers, and fix them on the classroom walls or board. 15’

  1. A local government representative, previously invited by the teacher for the purpose, comes to the class and presents local public institutions, what they are responsible for and how people can participate in local decision-making. 10’

  1. The students check with the local representative the correctness of their organograms and ask questions of the different levels of governance and responsibilities, based on the ideas they wrote down (before the local representative spoke). 10’
Reflection
  • Can we say that there is a European level of governance? 5’
  • Do you know any public European institutions for active citizen participation? Which ones?

The teacher can handle information on national and European public institutions for active citizenship. For EU institutions and other bodies, check the suggested reading above.

Notes
Digital Resource

Animated movie on local governance, like Once upon a time, local democracy: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/36/Once upon a time, local democracy.mp4


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5 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / We debate, We decide (Active citizenship and the rule of law)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 120 min
Energizers otherness     3 - Amoeba

An evolution game! Everyone starts off as an amoeba, with the purpose of evolving to a human. All students walk around acting like an amoeba and when they meet with another amoeba, they play one round of rock/paper/scissors. Whoever wins evolves into a worm. When two worms meet they play again rock/paper/scissors and whoever wins turns into a wasp, but whoever loses goes back to becoming an amoeba. This continues until one becomes human. The evolution stages are: amoeba à worm à wasp à chicken à monkey à human.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     9 - Lion's breath

Lion’s breath is a playful way to release and relax into more peaceful feelings. The trainer tells students that they are going to do a breath called the lion’s breath in order to let go of feelings or thoughts we no longer want. This breath is very helpful in getting those ideas out of us and pushing them far away.

Instructions

  • Imagine that you are a mighty lion. You have a giant roar!
  • Sit on your heels and sit up tall like a mighty, proud, lion. Get ready to let your roar go!
  • Think of a feeling or a thought that you would like to let go. Squeeze your hands into fists, holding tight and thinking of that feeling or thought.
  • Take a deep breath in and let your roar out, stick out your tongue at the same, stretch your arms out wide in front of you and open your hands wide, roaring out the feeling or thought and letting it go.
    • Repeat.
Objectives
  • To develop active citizenship through practicing public debate and democracy rules;
  • To practice speaking in front of an audience;
  • To develop critical thinking skills in a real-life-case scenario;
  • To share opinions with others while respecting others’ views.
Preparation

Materials

  • A laptop
  • A projector (optional)
  • Papers and pens
  • Voting paddles (thumb up and thumb down) - to be printed (1 per every audience group).

Suggested Reading

  • Oxford- Style Debate (European Corporate Governance Institute)

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Introduction

This activity is based on the technique of the Oxford-style debate, adapted for children. Students will be engaged in a mock decision-making process that allows them to explore a topic related to democracy and the law in their country or in their school, apply critical thinking skills in a real-life-case scenario, share their opinions with others while respecting others’ views.

Derived from the Oxford Union debating society of Oxford University (The Oxford Union), "Oxford-style" debating is a competitive debate format featuring a sharply framed motion that is proposed by one side and opposed by another.

Methodology

NFE Tool  Oxford-Style Debate

  1. With the teacher’s help, students need to decide for a topic and a related proposal to debate and vote during the activity. Students can choose any topic that can be controversial for the class in that moment, such us the choice of the destination for the next class trip, or some more general topic like “Can minors (before 18 years old) work? Is it right or not?”  (10)
  2. Students will be divided into the following three groups: 1. Party in favour of the proposal; 2. Party against the proposal; 3. Voting audience (the majority of students are members of this group). A game can be used to assign students to the groups or they can volunteer. The facilitator will inform that students becoming members of one of the parties will be required to give a short speech. (10)
  3. Each party is given 10 minutes to prepare the first speech of just 3 minutes, defending its position in few points. (10)
  4. The debate can now begin. One 3-minute speech per party – one speaker only - is given to the audience. The parties makes notes of the position of the opposite party in order to prepare the contro-speech. The audience is asked to vote, using the voting paddles (thumb up and thumb down). The teacher makes a note of the results. (10)
  5. Taking into consideration the first phase of the debate, each party is given other 10 minutes to prepare a longest speech of minimum 5 and maximum 8 minutes, arguing in deep its position. (10)
  6. The second phase of the debate takes place. One 5/8-minute speech per party – one speaker only - is given to the audience. (20)
  7. The audience can ask from 1 to 3 question to each party, to clarify some points. The party can decide to answer to all the questions of to one or to or none of them. (15)
  8. The audience is asked to express its final vote using the voting paddles (thumb up and thumb down). The winner of the debate needs to hold the majority of votes. (5)
  9. The teacher will show the video and ask students their opinions/impressions (15)

DT: Democracy - A short introduction - by MinuteVideos available at:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=u6jgWxkbR7A

Voting paddles (thumb up and thumb down) - to be printed 

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Reflection

1.  Strips of paper are distributed to students, who are asked to write on separate pieces of paper their views on the topics below with regard to the activities they completed as part of the project. It is not necessary for them to write down their names. The topics for evaluation can be the following:

• How I felt about our activities

• What I found to be interesting about our activities

• My positive views about our activities

• My negative views about our activities

• My recommendations

2. Students are asked to put their papers into a Box according to subject. (For example, starting with “I felt”…). The teacher can prepare previously different little boxes using packaging or colors boxes or similar or he/she can ask students to put the papers creating different little piles.

3. Students are asked to take turns picking a strip of paper from the box and reading out loud the statement written on it. If necessary, the viewpoint presented is discussed. The teacher can encourage discussion by asking questions.  It is necessary to ensure that everyone’s opinions are read out.  (15’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Video http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/37/Demo.mp4


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6 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Citizens of Europe (Active citizens of United Europe)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 45
Energizers otherness     6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     18 - Making room

Participants are asked to raise their arms with palms facing up, imagining that they are pushing up the ceiling and are asked do a lot of strength in that direction to increase the space of the room where they are. Then they are asked to turn the arms down with palms facing down thinking that they are pushing down the floor. They are asked to push away the walls turning their left arm and palm to the wall on their left and their right arm and palm to the wall that’s on their right.

Objectives
  • To know more about European Union
  • To draw students’ attentions about European Union
Preparation

Materials

  • A laptop
  • A projector (optional)
Introduction

The activity aim to draw students’ attentions about European Union making students’ know more through a challenging game.

Methodology

NFE Tool : quiz

  1. Depending on the number of computers available, the students can do the quiz one by one or divided in teams or all together;
  2. The teacher can decide to show the correct answers through the ppt after each question, or all at the end. (30)

Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary, using the questions below (15):

  • Do you think you know enough about European Union?
  • Do you think you are a real European Citizen?
  • Are you interested in the topic?
  • Do you think is important? Why?
  • Would you like to talk more about European Union at school?

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Notes
Digital Resource

Quiz - https://goo.gl/8JsA8C

Powerpoint with answers http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/38_eu_in_slides_en.pdf


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7 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Action for Change (Organizing campaigns for democratic involvement)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 80 min
Energizers otherness     7 - Connecting eyes

Participants stand in a circle. Each person makes eye contact with another person across the circle. The two walk across the circle and exchange positions, while maintaining eye contact. Many pairs can exchange at the same time, and the group should try to make sure that everyone in the circle is included in the exchange. Tip: Begin by trying this in silence and then exchange greetings in the middle of the circle.

Variations: If the teacher considers, knowing the class atmosphere, that some students might be left not participating, i.e. they try to make eye contact but nobody responds to them and they have no chance to move from their initial position, the moderator could divide the class in 2 groups and introduce a competitive element – after the activity each group will be marked on the ‘team spirit thermometer’ (which could be printed on a A4 paper and the teacher marks the degrees with a marker). The more people you have left not participating in the ‘eye contact’ activity – the lower the degrees to be marked on the thermometer.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     2 - Progressive muscle relaxation

To release tension from head to toe, students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and focus on tensing and relaxing each muscle group for two to three seconds each. The teacher guides the students; he/she asks them to start with the feet and toes, then move up to the knees, thighs, rumps, chest, arms, hands, neck, jaw, and eyes—all while maintaining deep, slow breaths.

Kelly Roper

Objectives
  • To sensitize students about active citizenship and democratic involvement in their community;
  • To identify problems which need to be addressed in their community;
  • To identify strategies and concrete action for change.
Preparation

Materials

  • Action Plans to be printed (2 per group)
  • Papers and pens
  • Flipcharts
  • Computer and Projector (Optional)
Introduction

The activity is aimed to help children to identify problems to be addressed in their local context as well as concrete strategies to change the situation, sensitize them to be actors of change, active citizens in their community.

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Methodology

NFE Tool : Action Plan, based on (FS2C From School to Community)

  1. Students are divided in small groups of 3 or 4 members;
  2. Each group is asked to think about their community/neighborhood/city and to discuss the issues that require a solution. Each group is then asked to agree and choose on only one issue per person. (20)
  3. Each student writes the issue identified on a paper and attach it on its chest. After that all students start to move around the class finding the classmates who expressed an idea similar o equal to them trying to create some groups according to the main issues they want to solve. (10)
  4. Teacher will provide each group with the Action Plan. Each group develop and reproduce its own Action Plan in a flipchart. The teacher will support the groups, if necessary; (20)
  5. Each group present its own action plan to the whole group in plenary. (15)

DT: Action Plan to be printed (1 per group) Video "What is Active Citizens?" - British Council

Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary, showing the Video and using the questions below (15):

  • How did you feel about the activity?
  • It was interesting to talk about issue to be solved in your local context?
  • It was useful to talk with other peers to find solutions or way to address the issues?
  • The action plan was useful to identify a strategy to intervene?
  • Do you feel you can act for change the situation?
  • You will do it?
Notes

If students face difficulties in choosing a topic to discuss, we suggest the teacher to stimulate students to find some interesting topic related to students' background, or any topic they are currently working on.

Digital Resource

Video "What is Active Citizens?" - British Council

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/39/WhatActiveCitizens.mp4


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8 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Save the Earth (Organizing campaigns for environment protection)
Developed by CSC DANILO DOLCI
Duration 80 min
Energizers otherness     15 - Animal roundup

The teacher tells to the class to silently think of an animal. Then he/she tells to the group that without talking, they need to arrange themselves on a line from largest to smallest animals. Group members can only make gestures and the noise of their animal. After they have finished, teacher ask to the students to say the animal they were supposed to be to see if the order is correct.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Objectives

To sensitize students about environmental protection

Preparation

Materials

Papers, pens and crayons

Tips

The teacher can print the drops or make the students draw them.

The teacher can change and/or adapt the question to the level of knowledge of the class regarding the topic.

Suggested reading

(National Institute of Environmental Health and Science)

Introduction

The activity aims to draw students’ attentions about the risks of climate change and the importance of preserve the environment. 

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Methodology

NFE Tool  Quiz Game

  1. The teacher will introduce the topic of environment protection through the video and some question such as:
  • What is pollution? How many kind of pollution do you know?
  • Do you know what are the 3 R’s ?
  • Do you think you can do something to save the Earth? (20)
  1. The students will be divided in two groups: the first one will play the role of the trees, the second one will be the drops of water. The trees need the drops water to grow up and live but this ones can touch the trees and “feed” them just if they give correct answers to the questions the teacher will ask. The trees will start pretending to be a seed and starting growing each time they will receive a drop of water.  (20)
  2. The students will create some slogans to be spread in their school but also through social media for sensitize their peers about the importance of the environment protection. They can write them down on colored papers and affix them in the class and in the corridors. Students can also combine the slogans with some drawings. (25)

DT: Video “Save our World

drops to print

questions to print

Reflection

Teacher will stimulate the reflection in the plenary, using the questions below (15):

  • Have you learned something interesting about environment protection?
  • Do you think is it important to commit in our everyday life to protect the environment? Why?
  • Do you think you can do the difference?
Notes
Digital Resource

Video “Save our World”

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/40/SaveOurWorld.mp4


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9 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Organizing campaigns for support of people in need
Developed by AENAO
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     8 - Find another seat:

Have the students sit on chairs in a circle, with the number of chairs being one less than the number of students. The student without a chair stands in the middle and tells their name. Then the student calls out a characteristic or a colour, or type of clothing, e.g. “Everyone wearing orange!”. All participants who are wearing orange must get up and find another seat, but not the one immediately to their right or left. The student in the middle races to find a seat and the person left standing becomes the next caller in the middle.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Objectives
  • To become familiar with the Theatre of the Oppressed
  • To raise awareness on oppressed and oppressors
  • To be inspired in order to overcome difficult situations
Preparation
  • Suggested Reading:  Augusto Boal’s FORUM THEATRE for teachers.pdf (Susie MacDonald - Daniel Rachel), pages 2-3.
  • Tips. A joker that is described in pages 3-4 is basically the person who introduces the scenes (i.e. scene 1, scene 2, etc). In this exercise, it is better that the Joker’s role is kept as simple as that.
  • Materials. Camera.
Introduction

A typical session (act) focuses on oppression or a problem. The structure of the act involves a Protagonist (the oppressed person) who is defeated or frustrated by the Antagonist (the oppressor). The character of the Antagonist could be multiple; i.e. many Antagonists can appear in the session. A typical session could also have many scenes (i.e more than two), where the scenes are represented to the audience by the Joker.

The act is played once. Then it is played once more; this time the audience can interfere.

What is the role of the audience?

The audience while watching the Forum theatre become the Spect-Actors and can offer alternatives to the Protagonist. The second time that the act is played anyone from the audience can shout “Stop”, halt the action, take over the role and try out another solution. Anyone who wants to can have a go. Usually, the only role that is replaced is the Protagonist (even though there are few rules governing whether and when other characters can be substituted). All together (Spect-Actors), Protagonist and Antagonist “rehearse change”.

The Joker introduces every scene (a theatrical play can have one or more scenes).

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Methodology

NFE Tool Theatre of the oppressed (Susie MacDonald - Daniel Rachel), team work.

DT is required to be watched before this exercise begins.

1.    Teacher introduces the technique of the theatre. He/she explains further the DT and the technique and answers questions.
(10’)


2.    Teacher introduces the following roles. The roles are assigned to students (preferably to be assigned voluntarily):
    Parent of Student A.
    Student A: Protagonist (the oppressed). It is a new student in a new school, who has:
-    A beautiful voice (he/she can join the choir)
-    A disability (his/her left hand cannot move, it is like it is attached to his/her shoulder). If wished, the disability could be something else, as long as it is a physical disability.
    Student B: Antagonist (the oppressor). He/she is a popular student who oppresses the weak (and of course student A)
    Teacher C
    Sports teacher D
    Music teacher E.
    The Joker: the person who introduces the scenes.
    Two or three more students who will be present in scenes 1-4 and they will support Student B.
    The rest of the students are the audience.
(10’)


3.    Students are given the following scenario.

A new student A is enrolled in a new school. Student A faces the following difficulties (is oppressed) as described in the following scenes:
(a)    Scene 1: when student A goes to the new school to enroll, accompanied by one parent, there is a student B in school that is very popular and oppresses student A.
(b)    Scene 2: when student A is late for 2’ on the first day, teacher C reprimands and oppresses the student. Student B is also late (10’), however teacher C does not react at all.
(c)    Scene 3. When student A joins the sports team (student A can join the sports team, because his/her disability allows him/her to do so), student B is complaining to the sports teacher D and oppresses student A. Sports teacher D does not allow student A to join the sports team.
(d)    Scene 4. When student A joins the choir (student A has a beautiful voice, remember?) student B makes fun of about student’s A appearance and claims that even this is a choir, students must be beautiful. Student B sings with a terrible voice, however, music teacher E does not react and lets student B join the choir whilst does not care for student A.
(e)    Scene 5. Student A goes back home when first day at school is over. He/she meets his/her parent who is reading the newspaper. Student A is trying to explain to the parent his/her problems from the first day at school, but the parent does not seem to encourage the student to deal with the problems. Instead, the parent is trying to justify for the student B and all the teachers’ behavior. 
 (5’)


4.    “Actors” first play the scenario as it is. It is clear who is the oppressed and who the oppressor is.  
(20’)


5.    Now, “actors” play the scenario again. Students from the audience can shout “STOP”, cut the scene and change the story. THEY CAN ONLY CHANGE THE ROLE OF THE OPPRESSED. 
The act can be played several times as long as there are students from the audience who wish to interfere and change the story. Teacher encourages audience to interfere.
(20’-30’)
 
Optional: The students can film the theatre and upload it on the website 
DT Animated Video (to be watched prior to exercise)
 

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Reflection

Teacher asks questions in the plenary:

  • How was it for the actors to act according to the roles?
  • How was for the audience to watch the play without interfering?
  • How was for the audience to interfere?
  • How did it feel when you were not able to change the oppressor, just the oppressed?

(10’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Animated Video

https://vimeo.com/166002593 


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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otherness
10 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / How to Build your Dream School
Developed by AENAO
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     3 - Guided breathing

Teacher asks the students to close their eyes (if comfortable), inhale for a count of four, then exhale for a count of four (all through the nose, which adds a natural resistance to the breath). Then, with one hand on the chest and the other on the belly, the students can take a deep breath in through the nose and exhale through the mouth, ensuring this way that the diaphragm (not the chest) inflates with enough air to create a stretch in the lungs

Jordan Shakeshaft

Objectives
  • To become familiar with the concept of what is considered as healthy.
  • To become familiar about TED talks
  • To be able to “produce” a campaign through the method of TED talks.
Preparation
  • Suggested Reading:

http://speakupforsuccess.com/10135/how-are-ted-talks-and-business-presentations-different/

http://www.youtube.com/watch?v=wkfYzs2Qv-M

  • Materials

Flipchart/board, markers, camera

Introduction

Healthy living means making positive choices that enhance your personal physical, mental and spiritual health. You make these choices when you are eating nutritiously, doing sports and respecting the environment.

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Methodology

NFE Tool Brainstroming, team work, TeD talk

  1. Students need to watch DT’s before this exercise begins. Teacher can further explain what a TED talk is (according to the DT’s and the suggested reading) and answer questions.      
  2. Brainstorming on the following categories (separately)

(a) Imagine that you are building a new school. Where would that be? (i.e. in the countryside, near the sea, in an island, in the city centre, in the forest, etc).

(b) Now, describe how the facilities would look like. (i.e does it have a lot of buildings, big yard, sports fields, laboratories, big restaurant, etc)

(c) Do you have time to eat your lunch? Where is that? What kind of food is it served?(i.e. students eat lunch at 12.00 in the restaurant of the school where healthy meals are served such as cooked meals/fruits/salads etc)

(d) Are you doing any outdoor activities in your weekly programme? Where? What kind of activities? (i.e. hiking, playing sports, treasure hunting, etc)

        3. Students are divided in four groups according to the categories described in step 1:

  • Group (a) : location of the school
  • Group (b) : facilities of the school
  • Group(c): food in the school
  • Group (d): outdoor activities in school

        4. Students in each group will decide what is best for their school in terms of “Healthy living”. They can decide whether they will use what is written when they brainstormed about their school or add new elements. They will prepare a campaign similar to TED talk.

TED talks should be 2-3’ per group.

         5. Presentation of TED talks.

Optional: TED talks can be filmed and uploaded to website

(15’)

DT’s

1. Animated Video &

2. https://www.ted.com/talks/matt_cutts_try_something_new_for_30_days#t-12500

Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary the following questions:

  • Did you like the school that you built?
  • How difficult was it to decide what is “healthy living” for your group?
  • How was the experience of producing a TED talk?

(10’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Animated Video, Video (Ted Talk)

https://vimeo.com/170398308 


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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11 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Organizing campaigns for combatting violence
Developed by AENAO
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     18 - Mosquito game

The group stands in a circle and the facilitator tells a story about a plague of mosquitoes and that everybody has to kill the mosquitoes so as they don’t get malaria. The facilitator puts up a mosquito on the head of a person who must lower in order to avoid the mosquito. The two persons next to that person must clap their hands above his/her head to kill the mosquito, but the mosquito escapes and it goes on. When the group is already doing the game well and quickly, the facilitator will add more mosquitoes until it is almost impossible for the group to catch as many mosquitoes.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     12 - Warm back

A piece of paper is stuck to each student’s back and they are given a pen. The paper is already prepared. Each piece of paper says: “I like………..”. Slow music is played and the students walk around and write characteristics about the person whom they like on the paper. Each child is allowed to look at the paper at the end and take it home.

Objectives
  • Enhance the recognition that elements of violence exist in famous fairy tales and thus little children are exposed to them
  • Encourage participants to use problem-solving skills through the development of alternative approaches to these stories.
  • Create new fairytales as a tool of a campaign
Preparation
  • Suggested Reading

Read stories described below @ http://shortstoriesshort.com

  • Materials

Printed stories

  • Tips
  1. Stories can be given to students prior to this exercise, so they can study them at home
  2. Stories are available at all languages used for this project.

Note: Each partner should find these fairy tales in native language and add the links in the manual.

Introduction

Everyone remembers a fairy tale read by our parents, our grandparents, even by… us! But if we care to remember, classic fairy tales include violence, which – now that we got older and wiser – we don’t always understand its existence. Are we able though to change a story – no violence involved?

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Methodology

NFE Tool Story reading/telling, team work

Once upon a time… (AENAO - The Violet Project )

  1. Students are divided in four groups and are given a famous fairy tale to read.
  • Group 1: Cinderella
  • Group 2: The Sleeping Beauty
  • Group 3: Jack and the Beanstalk
  • Group 4: Snow White

      2. Once students have read the stories, they need to create a different/alternative version of the fairy tale, without violence.  (30’)

      3. They will read the new stories in the plenary            (20’)

* They can use the stories as a tool for organising campaigns to combat violence. Stories can be uploaded to otherness website.

DT Story https://issuu.com/annabei/docs/fairytale/5?e=7774976/30000297

Students can comment on the story given in the DT. 

Reflection

Teacher asks students questions in the plenary:

  • How did you feel when reading now (that you are older) this fairy tales?
  • Why do you think they include violence?
  • Is the fairy tale still interesting now that violence is excluded?
  • Would you use your new stories in real life towards your peers as a tool for combating violence?

(20’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Story http://issuu.com/annabei/docs/fairytale?e=7774976/35508423


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151

otherness
12 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Active customers
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 75
Energizers otherness     17 - Toaster or Rock Star

The group starts in a circle with one person in the center. The person in the center points at someone in the circle and says “Toaster” or “Rock star”.

  • If the person in the center says “toaster”, the person being pointed at needs to crouch down and jump up and say “butter me I’m done.” The people on either side should arms up and out strait creating a “toaster” around the person being pointed at.
  • If the person in the center says “Rock star”, the person being pointed at needs to hold his/her hands in front of their mouth as if he/she were singing into a microphone. The people on each side turn away from the person who’s been pointed at and pretend to play the guitar.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     13 - Body massage

The students stand in a circle: they need to follow all the movement the teacher does and massage themselves. The teacher starts to massage different parts of his/her body, starting from the head till the feet (it’s better if they take off their shoes). The teacher explains how the massage needs to be done, if delicate or more energetic.

Optional: The teacher can also ask to the students to massage another classmate.

Objectives
  • Students learn about consumer rights and the EU rules of protecting consumer rights.
  • Students become aware of what it means to be active and inquiring consumers and to inform adequately the authorities when your consumer rights are violated.
Preparation
Introduction

We have not only human rights but also consumer rights. They give us protection in order to obtain quality products and services. Consumer rights guarantee that we can return goods if we decide that they are no longer useful or are faulty. Thanks to consumer rights, we receive compensation for delayed flights, lost luggage or for other situations which may arise during travel. When we inform the authorities of consumer fraud, we act as active citizens and safeguard our safety. The EU rules of protecting consumer rights pertain to goods bought online or offline, food safety, children’s toys, household appliances and vehicles.

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Methodology

NFE Tool (case study; small groups work; discussion)

  1. Read Miss R.’s case. Encourage students to imagine how Miss R. felt when she bought a low quality product which is harmful to her health.  (15’)
  2. Discussion – What can we do to protect our consumer rights? Which marks on goods packaging show they fulfill EU requirements and standards? (10’)
  3. Play video clip “5 consumer rights you should know” and discuss with students key customers’ right in EU (10’)
  4. Case study – divide the students into three groups. Each group discusses the case and works out a solution from a different point of view: (25’)

Group 1: what would they do if they were in Nick’s    shoes?

Group 2: what would they do if they were in the trader’s shoes?

Group 3: what would they do if they were in Nick’s father’s shoes?

DT video (European Commission ) / (EU Justice and Consumers)

Reflection

When each group makes its presentation and offers a solution, the facilitator can ask the students the following questions:

  • How did you feel while working on the case?
  • What do you think about the situation now once you’ve become aware of the different viewpoints?
  • Why is it important to be active consumers and react when we are not content with the goods or services offered to us?
  • How can being active consumers contribute to increasing the quality of goods and services? 
  •  What is the difference between infringed consumer rights and customers’ whim?                                                            (15’)
Notes
Digital Resource

Video (European Commission ) / (EU Justice and Consumers): http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/44/ic12.mp4


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

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13 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Citizenship and the media
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     9 - Balloon pop

Have everyone form a circle. Instruct the participants to put one piece of information about themselves, e.g. I have 2 sisters, or my mother is called Samy,  on a small slip of paper, fold it, and put it in a blown up balloon. Throw the balloons in the middle of the circle and then have people take turns popping a balloon, reading the piece of paper, and guessing to whom the information applies. Participants could wander round the room asking ‘yes/ no’ questions to the other participants but not exactly the statement from the paper slip, e.g. they cannot ask “Have you got 2 sisters? But could ask “Have you got sisters?” and then “Have you got more than 1 sister?’, “Have got less than 3 sisters?”, etc. Game finishes when all participants have identified the author of the paper slip they have.

*Note: this exercise should be used if there is enough time.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     17 - Circle massage

The group forms a circle and faces one direction. Each participant places his/her hands on the shoulders of the person in front of her/him. Each person then gives the person who is in front a shoulder massage. The person being massaged can give a feedback. After a few minutes, the group turns the other way so that the person who has been making the massage is then receiving it in return.

Objectives
  • Becoming aware of the role of the media in civil society and of their importance.
  • Distinguishing between the different types of media and their ability to inform and cover the problems of citizens.
  • Understanding when it’s worth contacting the media and how to communicate with them.
Preparation

Suggested reading:

Mind map https://litemind.com/what-is-mind-mapping/

Materials:

Thick drawing paper or white board, paper A4

Markers and colored pencils

Printed handout for role play

Introduction

The media are a means of communication between the people (the public) who want to hear and learn the news and the people (organizations) who send out the messages. The media play a very important role in civil society because they give events and policies publicity and can help to protect human rights in conflict situations. That is why the media are called the Fourth Estate or the fourth branch of government, together with the legislature, the executive and local authorities.

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Methodology

NFE Tool Role play, Mind map (Wikipedia)

  1. Mind map – divide the students into two groups. Each group makes a mind map, using colored pencils and markers. For example use the picture presenting mind map about a question “How we can help to our classmate with media?”        (20’)
    • Group № 1– a mind map of the types of media
    • Group № 2 – a mind map of the media benefits
  2. The students watch the video and then discuss what is the role of the media in our society and how can the media help us.    (15’)
  3. Role play – How to communicate with the media? –  role play script

Allocate the roles (group or individual). Some students can be observers who will provide feedback on the participants’ performance when the game is over. Give students enough time to prepare.                     (25’)

Give students the opportunity to role play the situation spontaneously without directing them.                                                                       (15’)

DT video clip

Reflection

When the role play is over, the facilitator ask the students the following questions:

  • How did you feel in the role of journalists, reporters?
  • How did you feel when you had to talk with representatives of the media?
  • What was the most important message you wanted to convey with the help of the media?
  • Did you manage to drive home your message the way you wanted to?

What feedback did you get from the observers?                           (15’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Video - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/45/IC13video.wmv

RolePlay - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/45_IC13 roleplay.pdf

MindMap - othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/45/IC13mindmap.pdf

https://litemind.com/what-is-mind-mapping/ 


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

155

otherness
14 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Active communication for democratic citizenship
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 75
Energizers otherness     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     12 - Warm back

A piece of paper is stuck to each student’s back and they are given a pen. The paper is already prepared. Each piece of paper says: “I like………..”. Slow music is played and the students walk around and write characteristics about the person whom they like on the paper. Each child is allowed to look at the paper at the end and take it home.

Objectives
  • Developing skills in expressing feelings, asking questions, showing tolerance for different viewpoints in conversation.
  • Becoming aware of the opportunities for communication through various communication channels.
Preparation

Materials:

Thick drawing paper or white board

Colored markers

Handout – case studies

Introduction

When we communicate, we connect with other people, share information, and get to know ourselves and the others. Effective communication means being able to express one’s viewpoint and respecting other people’s opinion at the same time. We communicate though speech and language, body language, the written word and information technologies.

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Methodology

NFE Tool Case study

  1. Use power point presentation – 1st slide and ask question – “What do you see in the pictures”?

Students are shown the first two pictures in the presentation in a row. Without too much thinking, they have to say what they see in each picture (for example, a woman’s face or a flower; an old man; a young woman, dogs on the pavement, etc.)

  • : When people communicate, they perceive each other subjectively. Different perception is influenced by one’s mood, experience, attention focus. We perceive certain traits, while others remain hidden. That’s why we have to be tolerant to differences and strive to get to know the people we communicate with rather than judge them.                                                                                                      (15’)
  • Picture story

The students look at the picture story in the presentation and the facilitator encourages them to answer the two questions that follow the story and pay special attention to signals of body language which we use to express emotions, feelings and experience.                         (15’)

  1. “I message”

The students look at the steps in the “I message” which shows how we express our feelings and our view point in complicated situations.    (10’)

  1. Case study

The students are divided into pairs.  Each pair is given a situation which they have to present using the “I message”.                                         (20’)

DT: Power point presentation

Reflection

When the students finish working on the case studies and practicing the “I message”, the facilitator sets up a reflective discussion on the following questions:

  • How did you feel when your classmate used the “I message” while talking to you?
  • How did you feel when you used the “I message” instead of the more common “you are …”
  • What different means of communication can we use to help us communicate with a deaf person? Or a blind person?

On what occasions can body language help us communicate? (15’)

Notes
Digital Resource

Case Study: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/46_IC14_case study.pdf

PowerPoint presentation: othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/46/IC14 Active Communication.pptx


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

157

otherness
15 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Effective conflict resolution
Developed by PROSVETA
Duration 110
Energizers otherness     3 - Amoeba

An evolution game! Everyone starts off as an amoeba, with the purpose of evolving to a human. All students walk around acting like an amoeba and when they meet with another amoeba, they play one round of rock/paper/scissors. Whoever wins evolves into a worm. When two worms meet they play again rock/paper/scissors and whoever wins turns into a wasp, but whoever loses goes back to becoming an amoeba. This continues until one becomes human. The evolution stages are: amoeba à worm à wasp à chicken à monkey à human.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     8 - Seasons of the year

All players sit in a circle, but not too close to one another. The teacher moves like a plant during the seasons of the year.

Winter: the plants are small, weak and are crunched together on the ground.

Spring: through the stronger sunshine, the plants grow slowly and slowly rise.

Summer: through the warm sun, the plants slowly open their arms, the flowers open their blooms are stand up straight.

Autumn: the sun rays become weaker. The plants begin to slowly shrivel, the blooms and leaves begin to fall away.

Objectives
  •  Students become aware of the positive power of conflict.
  • Students develop skills in effective conflict resolution based on the win-win strategy
Preparation

Materials:

Thick drawing paper or white board

Colored markers

Introduction

The ability of non-violent conflict resolution is a feature of democratic citizenship. Conflicts can be resolved through suitable communication between the arguing parties, through negotiation or mediation. The key aim of effective conflict resolution is to preserve the relationship so that the interests of both sided are satisfied rather than to win the conflict at the expense or loss of the other side.

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Methodology

NFE Tool Brainstorming, Role play, Team work

  1. Brainstorming

The students say words which they associate with the word “conflict”. The words are written down on the board or on a thick drawing paper. The students can also use drawings – symbols. Then the students group the words according to similarities, for example feelings, reasons, consequences of conflict, etc.                                                         (10’)

  1. Can a conflict be beneficial?

The students are divided into two groups. Each group uses the respective slide of the presentation and writes down suggestions on a thick drawing paper. Group 1 – what is beneficial to me?; Group 2 – what is not beneficial to me?                                                                                (15’)

  1. Conflict resolution through win-win strategy. Explaining the strategy with the diagrams in the presentation.                     (10’)
  2. Role play
    • Preparation: the students are divided into four small groups of 4-5 people. Each group discusses the situation and then develops an action plan.                                                                                 (20’)
    • Acting out the situation – role play. The participants pick the roles. Apart from the roles of Martin and John, there may be other roles too – of a teacher, parent, and classmate. (10’ for each group)

DT: video presentation

Reflection

When the role play is over, the facilitator sets up a reflective discussion on the following questions:

  • How did you feel as participants in the situation?
  • What would you do if you were in Martin’s shoes? And in John’s shoes?
  • Did you like and would you use the solutions offered by the groups? 
  • What helped to resolve the situation?
  • How the behavior of the participants hinders conflict resolution? What exactly? What else can be done in order to resolve the conflict?                                                                                           (15’)
Notes
Digital Resource

Role Play: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/47_IC15_role play.pdf

Video: http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/47/IC15-video.wmv


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

159

otherness
16 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Networking between active citizens
Developed by AENAO
Duration 90
Energizers otherness     7 - Connecting eyes

Participants stand in a circle. Each person makes eye contact with another person across the circle. The two walk across the circle and exchange positions, while maintaining eye contact. Many pairs can exchange at the same time, and the group should try to make sure that everyone in the circle is included in the exchange. Tip: Begin by trying this in silence and then exchange greetings in the middle of the circle.

Variations: If the teacher considers, knowing the class atmosphere, that some students might be left not participating, i.e. they try to make eye contact but nobody responds to them and they have no chance to move from their initial position, the moderator could divide the class in 2 groups and introduce a competitive element – after the activity each group will be marked on the ‘team spirit thermometer’ (which could be printed on a A4 paper and the teacher marks the degrees with a marker). The more people you have left not participating in the ‘eye contact’ activity – the lower the degrees to be marked on the thermometer.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     14 - Give me your energy

The students stand in a circle. The teacher starts, pretending he/she is holding a ball on the hands and passing it to the student on his/her right; this one do the same, until the ball comes back to the teacher. The ball needs to be passed in a gentle way, as it is very precious. At the second round, the teacher passes the ball to students in another side of the circle, making a gesture and a noise. The students will do the same until everyone will have touched the ball at least once.  The ball can be passed in any way (in form of kick, kiss…), pretending it becomes bigger or smaller depending on the will of the students. 

Objectives
  • To get familiar with Program Erasmus and Youth Exchanges
  • To be able to work in a network in order to develop a project
  • To realize what active citizenship is about in the concept of European projects. 
Preparation
  • Suggested Reading

Teacher and students should watch the prezi presentation shown in the DT (link is given below) prior to this exercise

  • Materials

Cartons/flipcharts, markers, Case study (to be handed in to all groups) available in the pdf file @ http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/pdf/48_IC16 Case Study.pdf

  • Tips
  1. Teacher can talk about opportunities on YE, E for youths (13 years old with an adult leader) described in the DT when the activity begins
  2. Teacher can describe the Case Study when giving it to the groups.

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Introduction

Citizens are members of a group or community who share the same rights and responsibilities (Social Education Victoria). As a citizen you can expect to be treated in the same way as everybody else in your community. Active citizens take action in order to improve their community, to make a difference!

Methodology

NFE Tool Case Study, Team Work, Simulation

  1. Students are divided into 5 groups.

Group A: Informal group* of young people dealing with helping youths in local community to seek for job opportunities, write a CV, etc located in Greece

Group B: Organisation (NGO)** dealing with engaging under-privileged youths into interactive games and help them be creative, located in Italy

Group C: Organisation (NGO) dealing with educating youths in environmental and health issues, located in Portugal

Group D: Informal group of young people dealing with grass root sports, located in Bulgaria

Group E: National Agency (a group of people who assists Groups A-D for finding partners and implementing the project).

*/** Informal groups and NGO’s (Non Government Organisations) are both organizations who can organize and take part as partners in projects of Erasmus such as Youth Exchanges.

  1. Each group is given the Case Study. Teacher also explains the Youth Exchange described in the Case Study.               (15’)
  2. Groups now need to develop the following Youth Exchange

Project title: Outdoor activities for students.

Duration: 5 days

Details: hicking, grass root sports, treasure hunts, field trips, organizing bazaars for used products in order to raise money for school trip, outdoor workshops etc.

Methodology: Non formal education (role playing, brainstorming, team work, artistic creation, outdoor activities, simulation)

Students need to:

(a) decide which group can organize the following project depending on relevance with the topic,

(b) show how they found their partners,

(c) show how they communicated with partners,

(d) show how the National Agency helped them,

(e) decide what activities to do during the project (i.e. what outdoor activities are important for them as a school),

(f) organize a final event so that the local community could know about their project (where to organize it, who to invite, how to invite people ;  i.e. use social media, flyers, etc).

(60’)

DT Prezi Presentation

http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/48/networking.html

161

otherness
Reflection

Teacher asks students in the plenary the following questions

  1. Was it difficult to develop such a project? (If yes, what were the difficulties?)
  2. How did you find it working all together for a common goal?
  3. Did you feel like active citizens when organizing such an event? If yes, why?                                    (15')                       
Notes
Digital Resource

Prezi Presentation http://prezi.com/yw9unkgdvn4x/?utm_campaign=share&utm_medium=copy 

Digital Resource - http://othernessproject.eu/atividades/digital/48/networking.html


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

162

otherness
17 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / European values
Developed by Prosveta
Duration 70
Energizers otherness     14 - I am going on a trip

Everyone sits in a circle. Start by saying “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug”, and hug the person to your right. That person then has to say “I’m going on a trip and I’m taking a hug and a pat on the back”, and then give the person on their right a hug and a pat on the back. Each person repeats what has been said and adds a new action to the list. Go round the circle until everyone has had a turn.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives

Students will:

  • Learn more about European values
  • Think over one’s own values and compare them to the values of other people in Europe
  • Become more empathic to people in need
  •  Develop their reasoning skills.
Preparation
  1. Suggested reading:  
  1. Materials and equipment: laptop and beamer, printed deliverables
  2.  Digital tool: IAC17.1, IAC17.2, IAC17.3, IAC17.4, IAC17.5, IAC17.6, IAC17.7.
Introduction

Values are the fundamental elements of the culture; they define the meaning and significance for the people within a social system (society.) The rules and norms of a society are derived from its values.

Values have a deep significance for the respective social system due to the fact that they significantly influence, control and regulate this social system.  

Values are the foundation of a society!  

Methodology
  1. What are the fundamental values in our society? Students share ideas

NFE tool: Snowballing                                                                                        5’

  1.  To get into the topic students watch the presentation about European Union’s fundamental values: respect for human dignity and human rights, freedom, democracy and the rule of law.                                                                                 5’

  2. What kind of place is Europe and what kind of place do you want it to be?

3.1. Gender equality                                                                                  15’

1. Questions to the students: Do you think men and women are equal? Do you think that everyone in Europe thinks that men and women are equal?

2. Guess: What percentage of people in your home country agree with the statement “Fathers are as well suited to look after their children as mothers.”? What about other countries? Fill in your guesses in the table (IAC17.2 )

3. Students compare their guesses with the data maps (IAC17.3  or use the presentation) and discuss any surprising data from the maps.

4. Students are split in groups of 4. (1) Each group steps in shoes of the people from one of the countries in the maps (Bulgaria, Poland, Greece, Portugal, Spain, Romania, Sweden, Ukraine) assuming the value expressed in the map. (2) Each groups receives a copy of the table (IAC17.4) and work together to agree on 3 reasons that are relevant for their assigned country. (3) Each group presents their findings to the class. The teacher starts a discussion about the process of choosing  the 3 reason – whether students relied on stereotypes or on their knowledge of the countries

3.2. Upbringing                                                                                            15’

1.Students receive copies of deliverable IAC 17.5 and the task to rank the following aspects in upbringing to how important they are to them personally (Individual work)

obedience

religious faith

learning how to save money

hard work

tolerance

imagination

good manners

independence

responsibility

2.Students compare their ranking regarding the different aspects of upbringing to the ranking of other Europeans (IAC 17.5 or use the presentation IAC17.9 ) and discuss their reasons for the ranking they did, any patterns they see in the maps, surprising data, etc.

3.3. People in need                                                                                               20’

  1. In social science, when considering the reasons why people live in need, there usually are considered four different reasons: (1) because they have been unhappy; (2) because of their laziness and lack of will power; (3) because of the injustice in our society; (4) because this is inevitable considering the way the modern world is going. Naturally, each specific situation of people in need, has its specific reason, which could be classified in one of the above mentioned general reasons.
  2. Students watch the pictures of the different people (IAC 17.6 - printed versions or watch the presentation IAC17.10) and do the tasks (1) What is the picture about? Are the people in need? (2) Look at the 4 possible reasons for the situation in the picture and choose the one that matches best your understanding of what you see in the picture. (3) Come up with a more specific reason which resulted in the situation you see in the picture.
  3. Students are split in groups of 3 to 4 people. They fill in the table (IAC17.7) with the specific reasons they have identified and match them with four general reasons from the speech bubbles.
  4. Students compare their results with a table presenting the results of a study conducted at EU level.
Reflection

Guided reflection:                                                                                                 10’

  1. How did you feel during the training? Students go to one of the space marked with the feeling which represents their overall emotion regarding the training activity as a whole: 1. Interested ; 2. Content; 3. Confused; 4. Surprised; 5. Excited; 6. Happy; 7. Embarrassed; 8. Nervous. When students split in the groups, they share in the group why they chose this feeling. After that one representative of the group reports to the other groups the why the students from his group have chosen the corresponding feeling. Flashcards with the feelings.
  2. Which training activity did you like most? - mentimeter voting.
  3.  How can you make use of what you have learned in the training?
Notes

In case of a distant learning training session, the following modifications of activities might be used:

Activity 3.1. Gender equality - activity 4. Students are split in groups of 4

and Activity 3.3. People in need: Create the corresponding number of Breakout rooms in ZOOM  Tutorial - how to activate and make use of the ZOOM Breakout rooms feature.

The activities in the training have been inspired by the European Values Study which  explores Europeans' attitudes about religion, politics, work, society, family and Europe. The maps are from the Atlas of European Values where you can find plenty of additional survey results and maps.

Digital Resource

Presentation IAC17.1; narrated version IAC17.1

Deliverables and visual materials: IAC17.2; IAC17.3, IAC17.4, IAC17.5, IAC17.6, IAC17.7

Data maps for activity 3.1.3 

Data maps for activity 3.2.2

People in need IAC17.10

How to use Mentimeter in the Reflection section (tutorial)

Tutorial - how to activate and make use of the ZOOM Breakout rooms feature


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

163

otherness
18 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Protect the environment
Developed by AENAO
Duration 75 min
Energizers otherness     3 - Amoeba

An evolution game! Everyone starts off as an amoeba, with the purpose of evolving to a human. All students walk around acting like an amoeba and when they meet with another amoeba, they play one round of rock/paper/scissors. Whoever wins evolves into a worm. When two worms meet they play again rock/paper/scissors and whoever wins turns into a wasp, but whoever loses goes back to becoming an amoeba. This continues until one becomes human. The evolution stages are: amoeba à worm à wasp à chicken à monkey à human.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Objectives
  • To become familiar with the ecological footprint
  • To raise awareness of ways to protect the environment.
Preparation
  • Suggested Reading

https://ww2.kqed.org/quest/2013/07/05/tracking-your-ecological-footprint/

https://www.footprintnetwork.org/our-work/ecological-footprint/

  • Materials 

    Video projector, pen and copy of questionnaire for each student
  • Tips

For the part where students answer the questionnaire, it is preferably to use an outdoor space or large indoor space.

Introduction

Imagine if trees gave off Wi-Fi signals; we would be planting so many trees and we would probably save the planet too. Too bad they only produce the oxygen we breathe.   (An ecological quote)

“The greatest threat to our planet is the belief that someone else will save it.”

Robert Swan

Methodology

NFE Tool Questionnaire

(Pearce, 2012), pg 26-28

  1. Teacher first explains to the students what an ecological footprint is. He/she also needs to focus on the fact students are not to feel guilty but to realise which areas they can improve. For each question students should consider for themselves which answer to give. If they are not sure which answer to give, they should estimate or else take the average answer. Students can also watch the video “The ecological footprint explained” https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=fACkb2u1ULY  in order to understand better the purpose of the ecological footprint.       (20’)
  2. Students are given a copy of the questionnaire (Q-IC18.pdf) and stand in a line. Teacher reads one question at a time - students mark their answers on the questionnaire and take the required steps forward. (10’)
  3. When all questions are read, students can observe where they are. They come together in a group.(5’)
  4. Each student sums up their results. Teacher explains what the numbers are and allows students to compare their results with the global average.

* See pg 26 of Bibliography manual (20’)

Reflection

Teacher asks students questions in the plenary:

  • Was it confusing to calculate your footprint?
  • How did you feel when you were taking the maximum number of steps?
  • How did you feel when you found out about your personal ecological footprint?
  • Do you think that there are things that can change in your daily life in order to reduce your footprint?

(20’)

Notes

Bibliography:  Pearce, C. S. (2012). Handbook for action against climate change. Brussels: International Falcon Movement-Socialist Educational International. Retrieved from http://www.ifm-sei.org/files/up/ATACC-publication-web.pdf

Tips: It is a good idea to plan delivering the training session partially outside the classroom so that the students could do steps 2 and 3 not being constrained by the space in the classroom. If this is not possible the teacher can use the school gym.

Digital Resource

http://me-you-us.eu/atividades/digital/691/691_ATACC-publication-web.pdf 

http://me-you-us.eu/atividades/digital/691/691_Environment_Protection-340536276.mp4

http://me-you-us.eu/atividades/digital/691/691_Q-IC18.pdf


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

164

otherness
19 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Solidarity Market
Developed by IPSantarém: Ana Da Silva | Ana Torres | Maurício D
Duration 2 x 45 m
Energizers otherness     4 - Human chain

Everybody stands up in a circle. They close their eyes and start moving towards the middle of the circle, holding their hands up. Whoever they touch with their hands, they hold and do not let go, so they make a knot. Then the facilitator asks the students to open their eyes and try to untangle themselves (make a circle) without letting go of their hands.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     17 - Circle massage

The group forms a circle and faces one direction. Each participant places his/her hands on the shoulders of the person in front of her/him. Each person then gives the person who is in front a shoulder massage. The person being massaged can give a feedback. After a few minutes, the group turns the other way so that the person who has been making the massage is then receiving it in return.

Objectives

To acquire knowledge about solidarity economy and markets;

Compare characteristics of different types of hypermarkets and local/municipal markets with the characteristics of solidarity markets;

Reflect on consumption, production and the exchange value of money;

Organize and carry out a solidarity market.

Preparation

Suggested reading:

Da Silva, Ana. "Try another form of economy with solidarity markets", in Brito, B .; Pinto, J .; Alarcão, N. (Org.) Opening Rails Weaving Networks. Reflections and Experiences of Local Development in Lusophone Context, pp.167-175. Lisbon: Gerpress / Center for African Studies and UAL, 2010. ISBN 978-989-96094-2-6.

In this article, you can consult a synthesis on methodology of organization and realization of a solidarity market.

Resource website of social and solidarity economy,http://www.socioeco.org/index_en.html

On this site, you can find thousands of publications, videos and other documents on social and solidarity economy.

Tips: Although markets can be organized by people from all scientific and curricular areas, they are an excellent opportunity for interdisciplinary work of different areas of social sciences and humanities (fairer, more democratic and ethical economy), natural sciences (sustainability) and mathematics (calculation of currency), and can also articulate with the area of Visual Education in the design and production of the solidarity/complementary currency. In the case of school-based markets, this option still has the advantage of using the school time of several teachers, not overloading only one teacher's time. For example, the market assembly can be held during the term of a discipline and the market can be held during the academic time of another discipline.

The quality of the Solidarity Market and the consistency of the learning will be greater if it is carried out after some activity and / or class on environmental, economic, social sustainability, etc., and/or in which they have the possibility to learn to recycle waste materials in the creation of diverse products, such as wallets with milk packages; bangles with stoppers, buttons or scraps of fabrics; omelets with scraps of vegetables, etc.

There should be an interval of at least 15 days between the first session of the activity (Market Assembly) and the second session (Market) to make sure that the producers have enough time to produce the products. During this time, the facilitator should check if the participants are making the products they agreed to bring to the market during the Market Assembly. You can opt for the strategy of requesting the delivery of the products 3 or 4 days before the market date. Thus, you may avoid that some young people forget to bring the products on market day. These markets can also be done with the exchange of services (instead of only products) but it would take the double of the time.

Materials:

For the Market Assembly: computer, multimedia projector and internet, big paper and thick markers.

For Solidarity Market: tables, chairs, paper, pens and other stationery (scissors, glue, etc.) to identify the market stalls and produce the solidarity (complementary) currency.

Digital tool: Prezi presentation: https://prezi.com/p/omiokkcxwn4x/economy-and-solidarity-market/

Introduction

Schools need a new education for an economy that fosters better human relations and an improved relationship with the planet. In this activity, we propose a perspective of economy based on solidarity chains of production and consumption and collaborative markets, where citizens share a new identity that is not based on economic growth, increased debt and destruction of natural resources. They actively share responsibilities, knowledge, products, co-participating in the organization of a solidarity market.

Methodology

FIRST SESSION - MARKET ASSEMBLY (45 minutes)

The facilitator makes an introduction to the solidarity economy and markets (using the Prezi presentation), stressing that we can choose to have consumer behaviors, identifying us more with environmental, economic and social sustainability, which is fundamental for our quality of life on a planet where there are still resources, but they have to be better preserved and more fairly distributed by all people. A slogan like "Live more simply so that other people can simply live" (15 minutes) can be used.

The facilitator explains (5 minutes): 

  1. that in the proposed solidarity market model, the participants should be both producers and consumers and that is why they are called prosumers, that is, they are the ones who make what they propose to take to the market. They can not bring anything that has not been produced by them or is not provided by them during the market, working another kind of personal identity more concerned with the sustainability and social justice; 
  2. that it is good that each prosumer invites a member of his/her family or a friend to accompany him/her on the market day, so as he/she may be freer to leave his/her stall and go to other stalls to buy other persons products; 
  3. that, during the market, every person must also buy products brought by other people, remembering that the exchange currency has no value outside the market and it is no use to accumulate money (thinking currency as opposed to the accumulation of money to enrich).

Afterwards, prosumers should plan the organization of the market by answering the following questions (15 minutes):

- When are we going to do the market? It is necessary to take into account the school calendar and the scheduling of other activities already scheduled to avoid overlapping of activities in the same place on the same dates. If there is an interdisciplinary articulation, check the availability of all the teachers involved.

- What names will we give to the market and the solidarity currency/money?

- Where are we going to do the market? Is there a large open space where we can put the stalls, such as a gym, a canteen, an outdoor patio, etc.?

- How much currency will we distribute to each person at the beginning of the market?  

The facilitator makes small groups of 5 persons and raffles tasks to perform by each group (the market must be fair also in terms of distribution of tasks) (10 minutes):

  • 1 group will organize and set up the stalls, and also decorate the space before the market (preferably everything with recyclable materials). This group has to check what material and physical resources are needed and available? It is necessary to check if there are tables to make the stalls for each prosumer, chairs for companions, stationery to identify the stands and to make posters of the market;
  • 1 or 2 groups will be responsible for cleaning the space after the market; 
  • 1 group will make the currency before the market. It should be with waste materials, as these markets are also in solidarity with the environment. Mind that the amount of currency that needs to be produced depends on the number of participants, but also on the quantity of products expected. This group will be responsible, on the market day, for distributing the same quantity of currency to all participating persons (amount previously agreed by the Assembly).
  • 1 group will ask each prosumer and register the products that each of them wants to bring to the market and those that he/she would like to find in the market (trying to have as much diversity as possible), using a table with three columns (see below). 

This group will ask each prosumer and register the products that each of them wants to bring to the market and those that he/she would like to find in the market (trying to have as much diversity as possible). For example, if a person named Mary proposes to make keyrings or origami (because she is competent to produce both), and there are other people who are also able to produce keyrings, but nobody else knows how to make origami, it's a good idea to ask Maria to make origami, as this will contribute to a greater diversity of products, making the market more interesting and more useful to everyone. It is normal that some people may have no idea of ​​what products they want to propose to the market, and it is important for the facilitator to find out what people like to do and things that interest them (their competencies, interests and what they like to do) so as to find something that the person feels comfortable doing. In the case of young people with many difficulties, it is always possible to learn to do something new that they want to reproduce later to take to the market. For example, if a person named Peter does not know how to make origami, but is interested in it, the visual education teacher can be asked to teach him how to make origami, so that he can produce various types of origami for market.

Name of Prosumer

What will you bring to market

What would you like to find in the market

SECOND SESSION - SOLIDARITY MARKET (45 minutes)

The facilitator supervises:

1. The placement on the stalls, by each prosumer, of the products to be exchanged and distribution of the same quantity of currency to all participating persons (the group responsible for the currency should handle to each participant, as he/she comes in, the amount of currency previously agreed in the Assembly (3 minutes);

2. The dynamic marking the value (price) of a basic product, from which each participant then assigns the value (price) for which he/she will sell his/her product (2 minutes).

The facilitator marks the opening of the market by saying "The Market is open", following the dynamics of acquisition (purchase) and provision (sale) (approximately 30 minutes, depending on the quantity and diversity of products, as well as number of participants).

It is possible to videotape the market to disseminate in the school and local community and write news (for example in articulation with language disciplines) about the market experience for the school newspaper or local media.

Reflection

Reflection: (10 minutes)

The facilitator talks to the students with the purpose of evaluating learning, as well as the quality of the market and the organization of the market.

What went well.

What went well and was thanks to my personal contribution.

What went the less well and strategies for it to run better in the future.

What I learned about solidarity economy and markets, about money and consumer identities.

Will I reflect on my identity as a consumer and the possibility of being more prosumer than consumer? (ie, will I think better before buying some products that I can do myself?)

The facilitator can choose to evaluate the satisfaction of the prosumers regarding parameters such as diversity of products, efficiency of the organization, interpersonal relationships during the organization and market implementation, market sustainability, learning, etc.

The facilitator can perform this assessment dynamically as follows:

- Write each evaluation parameter/dimension on a sheet of A4 paper with thick markers;

- Ask the group to stand in a circle;

- The facilitator places himself/herself in the center of the circle and shows the first sheet with the first evaluation dimension and asks the participants to come closer to the center if they are very satisfied with that first dimension and move away (back) if they are not satisfied and have aspects to criticize;

- The facilitator can ask the participants to explain the reasons why they are positioned closer (more satisfaction) or further away from the center (less satisfaction).

- The facilitator makes a short comment at the end.

Notes

Other Digital Resources:

Movies from solidarity markets with different ages and in different contexts:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfCzLFo7C6s&list=UUsdoDVQ2L8iRzF4o29BBKsw&index=50

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9Aa-cneo58

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSM2EKojbuw&list=UUsdoDVQ2L8iRzF4o29BBKsw&index=51

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqgHdk_Mi8c&index=52&list=UUsdoDVQ2L8iRzF4o29BBKsw

Digital Resource

Movies from solidarity markets with different ages and in different contexts:

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LfCzLFo7C6s&list=UUsdoDVQ2L8iRzF4o29BBKsw&index=50

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=n9Aa-cneo58

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=mSM2EKojbuw&list=UUsdoDVQ2L8iRzF4o29BBKsw&index=51

https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=vqgHdk_Mi8c&index=52&list=UUsdoDVQ2L8iRzF4o29BBKsw


Otherness Project - 2022/05/26

165

otherness
20 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / Community engagement
Developed by University of social sciences
Duration 70 min.
Energizers otherness     10 - Rope game

Have the participants stand on the middle of a space cleared of desks, chairs, etc. Divide the room in a way that allows them easily to move from one half of the room to the other, e.g. by placing a long piece of rope on the floor. The teacher stands at one of the ends of the rope and calls out a characteristic, or a colour or a letter, e.g.  “Everyone having blue eyes!”; “Everyone having 3 brothers”, “Everyone whose name begins with B”, etc. and points to the part of the room where the participants wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names have to move to. All participants who are wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names move to the respective part of the room; the ones who are not , have to go to the other part. Questions have to be constructed so that the class does not divide in groups having comparatively equal number of students, i.e. one of the groups should consist (in most cases) of one, two or few students. Debriefing: Participants are asked to share how they felt when they were part of a big group; and when they were standing alone (or were part of a very small group); what did they feel of themselves (as part of a small/ big group), and what their feelings were towards the group they were not part of.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     14 - Give me your energy

The students stand in a circle. The teacher starts, pretending he/she is holding a ball on the hands and passing it to the student on his/her right; this one do the same, until the ball comes back to the teacher. The ball needs to be passed in a gentle way, as it is very precious. At the second round, the teacher passes the ball to students in another side of the circle, making a gesture and a noise. The students will do the same until everyone will have touched the ball at least once.  The ball can be passed in any way (in form of kick, kiss…), pretending it becomes bigger or smaller depending on the will of the students. 

Objectives
  • To show the importance of collaboration in order to achieve the common goals.
  • To understand the sense of common activities for social and personal good.
  •  To show the importance of working for the community in a voluntary way.
Preparation

Preparation:

The lesson should be done in a good, nice atmosphere, the teacher should avoid assessment of ideas, but in the cases of bad ones, show their bad consequences instead.

Materials:

Papers, computer, projector for the presentations.

Introduction

We all have some goals in our life. But as we are living together, some goals are common and require common activities. So this lesson is about the importance of collaboration as we all have common goals.

Methodology

NFE Tools: Simulation, role-playing game, case study, team working.

  1. Ask the students to write about the ideal classroom.

When they describe it, write the propositions on the blackboard. Then ask what is needed to organize it? What is required? Who can do it?

Reflection: This activity should show, that if we are dreaming about the place to be as a group (class), it requires common efforts.                                                                               10’

  1. Ask students what else can be done in their surroundings:
  • What problems are there?
  • What can be done with these problems?
  • How can they help to solve these problems?                                                    10’
  1. See the presentation AC20_1: The importance of community engagement during a crisis.
  2. Discuss:
  • Why is it important to engage community when something extraordinary occurred?
  • What should be done to inform as much people as it is possible?
  • What must be done in order to coordinate people’s efforts?
  1. Express that community engagement does not consider only the time of crisis and show the presentation AC20_2

5.1. Discuss:

  • What are the differences of aims of community engagement during crisis and in every day life?
  • How important it is to engage the community in every day life?                       10’

5.2. Explanations for the possible answers from pupils – teacher should not suggest answers to students.

The aim of these questions is to distinguish differences between situations, but also to find what is common:

  1. The community works better than individuals.
  2. We are social creatures, so we need others to act.
  3. We are not self-sustainable, we need others.
  4. An so on… It depends on creativity of students. Making here answers will suggests teachers that there are correct answers here, while this is not exactly what is all about.

The same with differences, however:

The biggest difference is, that during crisis the main aim of common engagement is to coordinate efforts, so the we must puta special attention on the process of communication and spreading news. While in everyday life the main aim is to gather ideas and try to find common solving for the problems that we as a group has.

  1. Divide the class into 4-5 groups. Each group needs to plan and present their social campaign as representatives of the municipality, considering the situation which was assigned to them (6.1 to 6.5). Each group aims at engaging the community to the highest extent considering the 5 principles presented in the AC20_2.

6.1. There’s a world championships in Snail Racing in your town. Ask the citizens to take part in guesting all the tourists that are going to visit your town on the occasion of this event.

6.2. There’s an invasion of wasps in the town. Ask the citizens to help to fight off the invasion.

6.3. There are forecasts about a flood that can happen in few days. Ask the citizens to help in common preparation to prevent the town from flooding.

6.4. There’s a project of competition between the towns about recycling. Ask the citizens to take part in this competition as the prize is worth the effort for every human in the town.

6.5. There’s a problem of water shortage in your town. Ask the citizens to save the water for the common good.                                                                                                                         10’

After the presentations of the 5 groups students discuss the following questions:

  • What was good in each of the social campaigns?
  • What could be improved?
  • What arguments can be controversial?                                                           10’
Reflection

Recap the lesson in answering the questions:

  1. Why is it important to engage in the community?
  2. What must be taken in consideration in establishing common goals?
  3.  How to encourage people to work together?                                                              20’
Notes
Digital Resource

Presentations: 


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21 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / You have the power!
Developed by ALTIUS Foundation
Duration 80
Energizers otherness     10 - Rope game

Have the participants stand on the middle of a space cleared of desks, chairs, etc. Divide the room in a way that allows them easily to move from one half of the room to the other, e.g. by placing a long piece of rope on the floor. The teacher stands at one of the ends of the rope and calls out a characteristic, or a colour or a letter, e.g.  “Everyone having blue eyes!”; “Everyone having 3 brothers”, “Everyone whose name begins with B”, etc. and points to the part of the room where the participants wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names have to move to. All participants who are wearing orange/ having 3 brothers/ having B names move to the respective part of the room; the ones who are not , have to go to the other part. Questions have to be constructed so that the class does not divide in groups having comparatively equal number of students, i.e. one of the groups should consist (in most cases) of one, two or few students. Debriefing: Participants are asked to share how they felt when they were part of a big group; and when they were standing alone (or were part of a very small group); what did they feel of themselves (as part of a small/ big group), and what their feelings were towards the group they were not part of.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     7 - Strong as a tree

All students spread out in the room. With their feet firmly planted on the ground, they pretend they are trees that are slowly swaying back and forth with a breeze. The movements become stronger as a storm approaches. The students try to make their movements as strong as possible, but remember to keep their feet on the ground. Slowly the wind dies down and the trees can rest.

Objectives

Main objective: To engage students in the decision-making process; to motivate and develop their skills for active citizenship.

 Aims:

  • То understand what it means to be responsible for your actions by making decisions for yourself in certain situations.
  • То learn how to uphold your needs, interests and goals, despite the pressure of others.
  • To get practical guidance on how to prevent being forced to do things you disapprove of.
  •  To practice the 4 steps for self-decision.
Preparation

Materials needed:

Laptop and projector for the presentation AC21.1

Printed copies of Handout 1 for each student for activity AC21_2.

Blue and green pencils for each student for activity AC21_2.

Printed copies of Handout 2 for activity AC21_3.

Digital resources:

AC21.1; AC21.2; AC21.3.

Useful links:

Convention on the Rights of the Child - adapted version for children

 https://www.savethechildren.org.uk/content/dam/global/reports/uncrc-child-friendly- version1.pdf

Introduction

Citizens have a role to play in building a democratic society and the development of skills and attitudes towards active citizenship is crucial. Not only are active citizens aware of their rights and obligations, but they also show solidarity with others and are ready to give something to the public. The development of decision-making skills is an integral part of education, with a view to disseminating fundamental values ​​and intercultural competences for active citizenship. Every decision-making process makes the ultimate choice that may or may not provoke action. Decision-making is the process of identifying and selecting alternatives based on the decision-maker's values, preferences and beliefs.

Methodology

Activity 1. Make better decisions! Think independently.                                             15 '

With this activity, students are introduced to the topic of how (the 4 steps) to think independently and make better decisions disregarding the opinions of others. (NFE tool – discussion based on the interactive presentation form the DT: AC21.1).

Questions to be discussed during or after the presentation:

  • Have you personally experienced situations in which the others have been forcing you to do things that are wrong for your age or unacceptable to you and the society.
  • What does it mean that one has the right to choose what to do in a given situation?
  • Do we have the right to decide for ourselves how to proceed?                                                                                                                              

Activity 2. Who Am I? (NFE tool: RMP; DT: AC21.2http://me-you-us.eu/atividades/pdf/715_AC21.2_AC21.3.pdf.)                 15 '

The activity is related to the AC21.1 presentation “Making decisions by yourself”: the work on step 3 “BE PREPARED”. Activity 2 helps students to reflect on their needs and values ​​so that they can understand what their interests are and what is important to them.

The teacher distributes Handout 1 from AC21.2 to all students.

Each student is asked to perform independently the following tasks:

  • Colour in green the things that fit his/her needs, interests and values.                   3 '
  • Colour in blue the things that do not match his/her needs, interests and values. 5'

Group work:                                                                                                                                5’

  • The class is divided in 4 groups
  • Each groups has to discuss and agree on five most important items from the table (choosing from the ones the group members have coloured in green), e.g. 1. HEALTH, 2. CAREER, 3. ….
  • The groups present their lists to the class providing some argumentation for the choice they have made, e.g. Health is most important, because if there is no health, one will achieve nothing.                                                                                       

Activity 3. A skater’s lane in the Central City Park. (NFE tool: case study, small group work, role play / simulation; DT: AC21.3).

Activity 3 is meant to practice the skill to assert yourself from the algorithm in the "Make your own decisions" presentation (Step 2, "THINK ABOUT THE CONSEQUENCES", and Step 4, "ACT FIRMLY"). It aims at making students aware that changes in societal development and global problems require active citizenship skills and behavior. This requires everyone to be aware of their responsibilities, to fulfill their responsibilities, to seek their rights, to take an informed and reasoned position, and to be involved in solving pressing problems.

Organization of the activity:

  • The participants are divided into three small groups who will take part in a simulation in which the local authorities want to ban skaters from the Central city park, whereas the skaters are unhappy with the decision and plan actions to counteract.
  • Each group discusses the case according to the questions as suggested in AC21.3 - Stage I.
  • Each group plays the sketch presenting their participation in the campaign to protect their rights. (8 'per group, total 25') (AC21.3 - Stage II).
Reflection

Guidelines for reflection

  • Is it okay for you to be accepted and to please others without openly expressing your opinion and position given a problem?
  • How do you meet the challenge of being yourself?
  •  Why is it good for everyone to make decisions about their actions and actions?
Notes
Digital Resource

AC21.1 - presentation; AC21.2_AC21.3 – Instructions and handouts

 https://www.savethechildren.org.uk/content/dam/global/reports/uncrc-child-friendly-version1.pdf


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22 othernessIdentity and Active Citizenship / The school is my chance!
Developed by ISJ Dolj
Duration 80’
Energizers otherness     6 - Keep walking

The teacher instructs the students to walk in different manners covering the whole rook, i.e. walk like you are very happy, walk like a very heavy elephant, walk like you are 80 years old, walk like it’s raining cats and dogs, walk like a toddler, etc.

Relaxing Exercises otherness     1 - Guided fantasy

Students are asked to close their eyes (if comfortable) and, with the guidance of the facilitator, slowly imagine a scene of the past or future event. More and more details are used to describe the event with all senses and thoughts. A suggested brief script could be à Begin by breathing slowly and deeply… Think of yourself in a place where you feel relaxed and at ease… Create all the details in your mind, what do you see… what the sounds are like, the smells and colors of this special place… Are there any people …?

Rossman, 2016

Objectives
  • Awareness of the causes and consequences of school dropout by pupils.
  • Recognizing children and adolescents at risk by pupils.
  • Discovering ways to prevent school dropout by pupils.
Preparation

Required materials: Computer/ alptop, projector

Introduction

The teacher is advised to find information (at national level) about: the dropout rate, the consequences of abandoning the future and the social integration of early school leavers and the society as a whole (for example, loss of workforce, especially skilled labor, rising costs with social assistance, endangering future generations by perpetuating dysfunctional models), but also about the causes of school dropout (for example, material difficulties, family disorganization through divorce, alcoholism, violence, abandonment, child and adolescent belonging to working groups illegal entry, early entry into the labor market, drown by immediate fast earnings, migration, etc.). The stages prior to school dropout are absenteeism and repetition. Teachers and students may have a critical or indifferent attitude. Such attitudes can lead to the avoidance of the school environment until it is left by the one in difficulty.

Students can get involved in preventing and combating school dropout by improving the social climate at the class and school level by, for example: increasing the acceptance of colleagues in risk situations, creating a friendly, family atmosphere, attracting students who are absent in different activities , attracting non-governmental organizations to help students with reduced opportunities etc.

Methodology

NFE Tools: brainstorming, case study, guided drama.

  1. The teacher plays the video and then explains the term "school dropout" to pupils and specifies the causes that can lead to absenteeism and school dropout. The teacher asks students to give examples of school dropout situations that they know (from the media or cases they know about personally).                                 10`
  2. The teacher ask the students to discuss different cases of school dropout (from step 1). They are analyzed in a group discussion: the needs of the protagonists, their emotions in different situations, the negative consequences of the choices they had made, and the solutions to the analyzed problem.                                                 10`
  3. The students are divided into 4 groups. Each group receives as a task to make and perform a short play comprising 3 scenes. In each scene, the main character is a student who is on the verge of dropping out of school.
  • The first scene will refer to the current situation of the pupil: their needs, emotions and actions.
  • The second scene, is about the future life of the respective student who has dropped out of school. What will happen to them? How will they integrate into society?
  • In the third scene the protagonists are pupils who are currently engaged to find a solution to prevent the student from scene 1 from dropping out of school and the consequences imagined in the second scene.
    • Group 1 has as main character a poor student;
    • Group 2 - a student from aa violent or alcoholic family;
    • Group3 - a student who is part of a neighborhood gang that he/she is very attracted to;
    • Group 4 - a student who works and is attracted to immediate fast earnings.

The students have the freedom to create the details of the situations. The teacher encourages students to perform as well as possible to stimulate their empathy and to increase their sensitivity to the cause.

Reflection

After the students played the scenes, the teacher asked them the following questions:

  • What emotions did you experience during the play?
  • What are your feelings about the main character?
  • Do you think that the intolerant attitude of teachers and classmates can cause a distressed student to move away from school?
  • Do you know situations of students who drop out school?
  • What will you change in your attitude towards those who skip classes or do not come to school for whatever reason?
Notes
Digital Resource

AC22 - video youtu.be/01IkjfRsx64


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Cross - Cultural Communication: Many Faces of Diversity. (n.d.). Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=MisplEvcl9c

Dolci Amico; Amico Fausto. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://danilodolci.org/media/English.pdf
EU Justice and Consumers. (n.d.). Retrieved from 5 Consumers Rights you should know: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=SaRKSdeHsjw

European Commission . (n.d.). European Commission. Retrieved from 5 Key Consumers' Rights: http://ec.europa.eu/justice/newsroom/consumer-marketing/events/140317_en.htm

European Corporate Governance Institute. (n.d.). Oxford Union style debate . Retrieved from http://www.ecgi.org/conferences/fese_efmc2005/ou_rules.htm

FS2C From School to Community. (n.d.). Children and Students as Agents of Social Change . Retrieved from http://cesie.org/media/handbook-fs2c-en.pdf

Heraldo V. Richards; Ayanna F. Brown; Timothy B.Forde. (2007, Jan/Feb). Addressing Diversity in Schools: Culturally Responsive Pedagogy. Teaching Exceptional Children, p. 64.

Identity and Diversity Toolbox. (n.d.). Salto Youth. Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/tools/toolbox/tool/identity-and-diversity-tool-box.1365

Intercultural game (Rafa Rafa). (n.d.). Salto Youth. Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/tools/toolbox/tool/intercultural-game-rafa-rafa.1502/

Jigsaw of Human Rights. (n.d.). Salto Youth. Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/tools/toolbox/tool/jigsaw-of-human-rights.281/

Jordan Shakeshaft. (n.d.). greatist. Retrieved from http://greatist.com/happiness/breathing-exercises-relax

Kelly Roper. (n.d.). Retrieved from http://stress.lovetoknow.com/Top_Ten_Relaxation_Techniques_Children

Millenium Training and Development Institute. (n.d.). SALTO Youth. Retrieved from https://www.salto-youth.net/downloads/toolbox_tool_download-file-1327/SimGame 3 - HOWGH.pdf

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Nancy Flowers. (2009). Council of Europe, Compasito. Retrieved from http://www.eycb.coe.int/compasito/

Nansy Spetsioti. (n.d.). YouTube. Retrieved from https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=dfccrwUlROU

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Indice Page
Acknowledgements 2
Preface 4
Introduction 5
Instruction to teachers 7
Beginning and Closing a Resource 8
Non Formal Education 11
Use of Digital Tools 15
Evaluation 16
Evaluation methods and strategies 17
Teachers' feedback 18
Energizers 20
Relaxing Exercises 26
1 - Human rights / My human rights are 30! 34
2 - Human rights / My right to anti-discrimination 36
3 - Human rights / My right to privacy 38
4 - Human rights / Take a step! (My right to equity) 40
5 - Human rights / My right to gender equity 42
6 - Human rights / My right to equity and nationality 44
7 - Human rights / I think, I believe (My right to conscience and religion) 46
8 - Human rights / Plus or Minus (My right to opinion and expression) 48
9 - Human rights / My deepest dream (My right to freedom) 50
10 - Human rights / My right to justice and law 52
11 - Human rights / My right to family 54
12 - Human rights / My right to social care and health 56
13 - Human rights / My right to education 59
14 - Human rights / My right to work 62
15 - Human rights / Living Democracy 64
16 - Human rights / Globetrotters - My right to move within and out of the borders of each country 67
17 - Human rights / Welcome, refugees! 70
18 - Human rights / My right to say no to hate speech 71
19 - Human rights / The Right to Public Assembly 72
20 - Human rights / My right to play - Traditional games 73
21 - Human rights / Copyright 74
22 - Human rights / Duties and Limitations 75
1 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / What’s diversity? (All different all equal) 77
2 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Prejudges and stereotypes 81
3 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Identity and diversity (ME-Others) 84
4 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Social Inclusion/Exclusion 86
5 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Racism: Stop and Play! (How to combat Racism) 89
6 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / I am able to do it! (Disability) 92
7 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Bullying: What should I do? (Diversity at school) 94
8 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Pink and Blue (Man and Woman) 96
9 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Sexual Orientation 98
10 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Intolerance/Discrimination 100
11 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Young-Old 103

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12 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Religion 105
13 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Social Status 108
14 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Cultural / Ethnic Diversity 110
15 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Hotel Great Europe (Country - Language) 113
16 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Whose Body is this? 117
17 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Social Inclusion and Sustainable Development 119
18 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Climate change and poverty 120
19 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Phobias and isms 121
20 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Diversity and Identities 122
21 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / Careers for everyone 123
22 - Diversity and Social Inclusion / What is it like to be hunted? 124
1 - Identity and Active Citizenship / My identities – me as a person, me as a citizen 126
2 - Identity and Active Citizenship / The school as a place for active citizenship 128
3 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Me as a citizen of the local community 130
4 - Identity and Active Citizenship / The active citizen knows the public institutions which are important for citizenship activities 133
5 - Identity and Active Citizenship / We debate, We decide (Active citizenship and the rule of law) 135
6 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Citizens of Europe (Active citizens of United Europe) 138
7 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Action for Change (Organizing campaigns for democratic involvement) 140
8 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Save the Earth (Organizing campaigns for environment protection) 142
9 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Organizing campaigns for support of people in need 144
10 - Identity and Active Citizenship / How to Build your Dream School 147
11 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Organizing campaigns for combatting violence 149
12 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Active customers 151
13 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Citizenship and the media 153
14 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Active communication for democratic citizenship 155
15 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Effective conflict resolution 157
16 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Networking between active citizens 159
17 - Identity and Active Citizenship / European values 162
18 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Protect the environment 163
19 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Solidarity Market 164
20 - Identity and Active Citizenship / Community engagement 165
21 - Identity and Active Citizenship / You have the power! 166
22 - Identity and Active Citizenship / The school is my chance! 167
Bibliography 168